78

Given a 3 times 3 numpy array

a = numpy.arange(0,27,3).reshape(3,3)

# array([[ 0,  3,  6],
#        [ 9, 12, 15],
#        [18, 21, 24]])

To normalize the rows of the 2-dimensional array I thought of

row_sums = a.sum(axis=1) # array([ 9, 36, 63])
new_matrix = numpy.zeros((3,3))
for i, (row, row_sum) in enumerate(zip(a, row_sums)):
    new_matrix[i,:] = row / row_sum

There must be a better way, isn't there?

Perhaps to clearify: By normalizing I mean, the sum of the entrys per row must be one. But I think that will be clear to most people.

  • 12
    Careful, "normalize" usually means the square sum of components is one. Your definition will hardly be clear to most people;) – coldfix Jul 13 '15 at 18:10
119

Broadcasting is really good for this:

row_sums = a.sum(axis=1)
new_matrix = a / row_sums[:, numpy.newaxis]

row_sums[:, numpy.newaxis] reshapes row_sums from being (3,) to being (3, 1). When you do a / b, a and b are broadcast against each other.

You can learn more about broadcasting here or even better here.

  • 21
    This can be simplified even further using a.sum(axis=1, keepdims=True) to keep the singleton column dimension, which you can then broadcast along without having to use np.newaxis. – ali_m Apr 23 '15 at 13:26
  • 5
    what if any of the row_sums is zero? – asdf Apr 24 '15 at 23:31
  • 7
    This is the correct answer for the question as stated above - but if a normalization in the usual sense is desired, use np.linalg.norm instead of a.sum! – coldfix Jul 13 '15 at 18:12
  • 1
    is this preferred to row_sums.reshape(3,1) ? – Paul Aug 10 '15 at 2:09
  • 1
    It's not as robust since the row sum may be 0. – nos Jun 8 '16 at 22:48
82

Scikit-learn has a normalize function that lets you apply various normalizations. The "make it sum to 1" is the L1 norm, and to take that do:

from sklearn.preprocessing import normalize
matrix = numpy.arange(0,27,3).reshape(3,3).astype(numpy.float64)

#array([[  0.,   3.,   6.],
#   [  9.,  12.,  15.],
#   [ 18.,  21.,  24.]])

normed_matrix = normalize(matrix, axis=1, norm='l1')

#[[ 0.          0.33333333  0.66666667]
#[ 0.25        0.33333333  0.41666667]
#[ 0.28571429  0.33333333  0.38095238]]

Now your rows will sum to 1.

9

I think this should work,

a = numpy.arange(0,27.,3).reshape(3,3)

a /=  a.sum(axis=1)[:,numpy.newaxis]
  • 2
    good. note the change of dtype to arange, by appending decimal point to 27. – wim Jan 18 '12 at 3:36
3

In case you are trying to normalize each row such that its magnitude is one (i.e. a row's unit length is one or the sum of the square of each element in a row is one):

import numpy as np

a = np.arange(0,27,3).reshape(3,3)

result = a / np.linalg.norm(a, axis=-1)[:, np.newaxis]
# array([[ 0.        ,  0.4472136 ,  0.89442719],
#        [ 0.42426407,  0.56568542,  0.70710678],
#        [ 0.49153915,  0.57346234,  0.65538554]])

Verifying:

np.sum( result**2, axis=-1 )
# array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]) 
  • Axis doesn't seem to be a parameter to np.linalg.norm (anymore?). – Ztyx May 25 '14 at 11:06
  • It works in python 2.7. – walt May 26 '14 at 16:32
  • notably this corresponds to the l2 norm (where as rows summing to 1 corresponds to the l1 norm) – dpb Oct 28 '14 at 22:40
1

it appears that this also works

def normalizeRows(M):
    row_sums = M.sum(axis=1)
    return M / row_sums
0

Or using lambda function, like

>>> vec = np.arange(0,27,3).reshape(3,3)
>>> import numpy as np
>>> norm_vec = map(lambda row: row/np.linalg.norm(row), vec)

each vector of vec will have a unit norm.

0

You could also use matrix transposition:

(a.T / row_sums).T
0

I think you can normalize the row elements sum to 1 by this: new_matrix = a / a.sum(axis=1, keepdims=1). And the column normalization can be done with new_matrix = a / a.sum(axis=0, keepdims=1). Hope this can hep.

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