74

How expensive are exceptions in C#? It seems like they are not incredibly expensive as long as the stack is not deep; however I have read conflicting reports.

Is there definitive report that hasn't been rebutted?

3
  • 1
    Exceptions that are not handled are not expensive. So you can use try/block. – Kishore Kumar Dec 2 '12 at 1:08
  • @KishoreJangid - just throwing an exceptions also has an overhead, even if they aren't handled. – BornToCode Aug 25 '15 at 8:04
  • 4
    Possible duplicate of How slow are .NET exceptions? – TheLethalCoder Jan 19 '16 at 15:58

10 Answers 10

73

Jon Skeet wrote Exceptions and Performance in .NET in Jan 2006

Which was updated Exceptions and Performance Redux (thanks @Gulzar)

To which Rico Mariani chimed in The True Cost of .NET Exceptions -- Solution


Also reference: Krzysztof Cwalina - Design Guidelines Update: Exception Throwing

4
  • Jon Skeet basically says "they're not expensive at all" but as we see from the other answers here, and elsewhere on the Internet, a lot of people are finding their C# code is significantly slower when catching a large amount of exceptions. There are two things causing this: 1) simple examples to compare execution time are SIMPLE, real world code usually is not, and 2) Catching exceptions is much more expensive when debugging (because VS has to stop execution and show you the exception). In applications where one is looping hundreds of thousands of times, small performance impacts add up. – jspinella Oct 1 '20 at 14:17
  • The trend I am seeing with those who are saying "my test code shows catching exceptions is VERY expensive" is they are looping thousands/hundreds-of-thousands of times. For an iteration of 100,000 objects, if each causes an exception to be caught, and each catch "costs" 1/33 ms (per the answer from Helge Klein) then I would expect exception-catching to add about 3 seconds to execution time, but d.a's answer suggests the penalty is much higher than 1/33 ms (although we don't know how many iterations are in his example, he says exceptions are even only thrown only 15% of the time). – jspinella Oct 1 '20 at 14:30
  • This is an old question, and old answer, but we're just answering the "How Expensive are Exceptions". This question inevitably arises from the well established notion that we want to avoid programming by exception. Exceptions should be for exceptional circumstances. The gist of the argument is that avoiding exceptions will in general benefit performance, but exceptions have their place and are a useful when used correctly. – Robert Paulson Oct 18 '20 at 21:48
  • It's a great answer but since most people will read your answer and then close the tab, and ignore all the useful and interesting answers below, I thought it was worth highlighting what those answers have to say. – jspinella Oct 19 '20 at 19:22
21

Having read that exceptions are costly in terms of performance I threw together a simple measurement program, very similar to the one Jon Skeet published years ago. I mention this here mainly to provide updated numbers.

It took the program below 29914 milliseconds to process one million exceptions, which amounts to 33 exceptions per millisecond. That is fast enough to make exceptions a viable alternative to return codes for most situations.

Please note, though, that with return codes instead of exceptions the same program runs less than one millisecond, which means exceptions are at least 30,000 times slower than return codes. As stressed by Rico Mariani these numbers are also minimum numbers. In practice, throwing and catching an exception will take more time.

Measured on a laptop with Intel Core2 Duo T8100 @ 2,1 GHz with .NET 4.0 in release build not run under debugger (which would make it way slower).

This is my test code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int iterations = 1000000;
    Console.WriteLine("Starting " + iterations.ToString() + " iterations...\n");

    var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

    // Test exceptions
    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();
    for (int i = 1; i <= iterations; i++)
    {
        try
        {
            TestExceptions();
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            // Do nothing
        }
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Exceptions: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

    // Test return codes
    stopwatch.Reset();
    stopwatch.Start();
    int retcode;
    for (int i = 1; i <= iterations; i++)
    {
        retcode = TestReturnCodes();
        if (retcode == 1)
        {
            // Do nothing
        }
    }
    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Return codes: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString() + " ms");

    Console.WriteLine("\nFinished.");
    Console.ReadKey();
}

static void TestExceptions()
{
    throw new Exception("Failed");
}

static int TestReturnCodes()
{
    return 1;
}
5
  • 2
    So they're not viable in a tight game loop, as I discovered. I was trying to be lazy with my index-out-of-bounds checks :) – mpen Dec 2 '12 at 2:15
  • How about as a return mechanism for REST call return values. With the overhead of the network connection itself, it would seem that throwing an exception with a HTTP status code embedded would be a very reliable, uniform, and relatively inexpensive mechanism for returning values, not to mention more useful information about where the request went wrong. It drastically simplifies business logic implementations as well, because thy either return successfully or throw informative, loggable exceptions. – Triynko Oct 19 '17 at 17:16
  • @mpen in gamedev (There are talks from ubisoft, naughty dog etc.) when it comes to C++ you don't use exceptions at all in your code. What you do is you use assert when something super exceptional happens, error handling is done with error codes. – Konrad Oct 11 '18 at 10:12
  • I don't know if this works the same way for C#, in web dev for example. – Konrad Oct 11 '18 at 10:13
  • That is fast enough to make exceptions a viable alternative to return codes for most situations. I would not say that a call stack with a depth of 2-3 really represents "most situations". Deeper call stacks should probably also be considered. – Vector Sigma Jul 2 '20 at 17:27
17

I guess I'm in the camp that if performance of exceptions impacts your application then you're throwing WAY too many of them. Exceptions should be for exceptional conditions, not as routine error handling.

That said, my recollection of how exceptions are handled is essentially walking up the stack finding a catch statement that matches the type of the exception thrown. So performance will be impacted most by how deep you are from the catch and how many catch statements you have.

6
  • 4
    @Colin while I agree with your statement, you're meandering off-topic and your tone is a little preachy. – Robert Paulson May 21 '09 at 3:10
  • And then you have Java camp, where exceptions are encouraged. – Unknown May 21 '09 at 3:20
  • 16
    If stating my opinion is "preaching", then so be it. My point still stands that if exceptions are impacting your performance then you need to throw fewer exceptions. It's not exactly what Chance's question is about but it most certainly is on topic. How am I supposed to know of Chance had considered my point already or not? – Colin Burnett May 21 '09 at 3:23
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    Doesn't sound preachy to me. Actually sounds just like what Jon Skeet said, "If you ever get to the point where exceptions are significantly hurting your performance, you have problems in terms of your use of exceptions beyond just the performance." – D'Arcy Rittich May 21 '09 at 3:24
  • Exceptions can become a performance issue even where they are an exceptional circumstance. For example, a third party API you rely on becoming unavailable during your peak load. Exceptions are appropriate (unavoidable even?)but even with an appropriate response, performance could be a concern to allow you to respond correctly (e.g. custom error page), rather than being DOSed (did not respond etc.). – penguat Feb 4 '15 at 15:31
4

Barebones exception objects in C# are fairly lightweight; it's usually the ability to encapsulate an InnerException that makes it heavy when the object tree becomes too deep.

As for a definitive, report, I'm not aware of any, although a cursory dotTrace profile (or any other profiler) for memory consumption and speed will be fairly easy to do.

4

In my case, exceptions were very expensive. I rewrote this:

public BlockTemplate this[int x,int y, int z]
{
    get
    {
        try
        {
            return Data.BlockTemplate[World[Center.X + x, Center.Y + y, Center.Z + z]];
        }
        catch(IndexOutOfRangeException e)
        {
            return Data.BlockTemplate[BlockType.Air];
        }
    }
}

Into this:

public BlockTemplate this[int x,int y, int z]
{
    get
    {
        int ix = Center.X + x;
        int iy = Center.Y + y;
        int iz = Center.Z + z;
        if (ix < 0 || ix >= World.GetLength(0)
            || iy < 0 || iy >= World.GetLength(1)
            || iz < 0 || iz >= World.GetLength(2)) 
            return Data.BlockTemplate[BlockType.Air];
        return Data.BlockTemplate[World[ix, iy, iz]];
    }
}

And noticed a good speed increase of about 30 seconds. This function gets called at least 32K times at startup. Code isn't as clear as to what the intention is, but the cost savings were huge.

1
  • 4
    Exceptions that are not handled are not expensive. – Kishore Kumar Dec 2 '12 at 1:08
3

I did my own measurements to find out how serious the exceptions implication is. I didn't try to measure the absolute time for throwing/catching exception. What I was mostly interested is how much slower a loop will become if an exception is thrown in each pass. The measuring code looks like this

     for(; ; ) {
        iValue = Level1(iValue);
        lCounter += 1;
        if(DateTime.Now >= sFinish) break;
     }

vs

     for(; ; ) {
        try {
           iValue = Level3Throw(iValue);
        }
        catch(InvalidOperationException) {
           iValue += 3;
        }
        lCounter += 1;
        if(DateTime.Now >= sFinish) break;
     }

The difference is 20 times. Second snippet is 20 times slower.

2

The performance hit with exceptions seems to be at the point of generating the exception object (albeit too small to cause any concerns 90% of the time). The recommendation therefore is to profile your code - if exceptions are causing a performance hit, you write a new high-perf method that does not use exceptions. (An example that comes to mind would be (TryParse introduced to overcome perf issues with Parse which uses exceptions)

THat said, exceptions in most cases do not cause significant performance hits in most situations - so the MS Design Guideline is to report failures by throwing exceptions

3
  • However, it does say exceptions should not normally be thrown: "Do not use exceptions for normal flow of control. Except for system failures, there should generally be a way to write code that avoids exceptions being thrown. For example, you can provide a way to check preconditions before calling a member to allow users to write code that does not throw exceptions." – Andrew Aylett Feb 2 '10 at 11:40
  • 1
    @Andrew: Right. Maybe my response to another question will help clarify my stand stackoverflow.com/questions/859494 . Throw exceptions only when the method is unable to carry out its reason for being. – Gishu Feb 2 '10 at 12:28
  • Agreed :). I just wasn't sure that "report failures" was clear enough. I like those guidelines. – Andrew Aylett Feb 2 '10 at 12:55
2

Just to give my personnal experience : I'm working on a program that parses JSON files and extracts data from them, with NewtonSoft.

I rewrote this :

  • Option 1, with Exceptions.
try
{
    name = rawPropWithChildren.Value["title"].ToString();
}
catch(System.NullReferenceException)
{
    name = rawPropWithChildren.Name;
}

To this :

  • Option 2, without Exceptions.
if(rawPropWithChildren.Value["title"] == null)
{
    name = rawPropWithChildren.Name;
}
else
{
    name = rawPropWithChildren.Value["title"].ToString();
}

Ofc you don't really have context to judge about it, but here are my results :
(In debug mode)

  • Option 1, with Exceptions. 38.50s

  • Option 2, with Exceptions. 06.48s

To give a little bit of context, I'm working with thousands of json properties that can be null. Exceptions were thrown way too much, like maybe during 15% of the execution time. Well, not really precise but they were thrown too many times. I wanted to fix this so I changed my code, and I did not understand why the execution time was so much faster. That was because of my poor exception handling.

So, what I've learned from this : I need to use exceptions only in particular cases and for things that can't be tested with a simple conditionnal statement. They also must be thrown the less often possible.

This is kind of a random story for you, but I guess I would definitely think twice before using exceptions in my code from now !

3
  • Hi, sorry for the late addition here, but wouldn't this be an unfair test? You used an 'if' statement to short-circuit the logic in option 2. A try catch block should say if () null { try } else { try }, right? I don't think that using an exception in place of an if statement is the same thing as comparing an exception to a return code, or an if check that triggers a try. – Sean Brookins Mar 5 '20 at 2:54
  • @SeanBrookins You mean to say he is testing "catching exceptions" and "no exceptions at all" versus a more-fair test, which would be "catching exceptions" and "throwing/not catching exceptions"? That's fair, but the difference is probably very minimal. – jspinella Oct 1 '20 at 14:12
  • This may be true, @jspinella, but if you were to use an if block that then also used exceptions (which I believe is the best approach), you may find that exceptions are not very costly. Using exceptions instead of logic made the performance worse, but exceptions are supposed to be for unexpected data, unparsable entries, etc. and not to replace logical checks. To assume that the difference is minimal would also mean that the initial observation shouldn't have been tested, yea? – Sean Brookins Nov 13 '20 at 0:42
1

I recently measured C# exceptions (throw and catch) in a summation loop that threw an arithmetic overflow on every addition. Throw and catch of arithmetic overflow was around 8.5 microseconds = 117 KiloExceptions/second, on a quad-core laptop.

0

Exceptions are expensive, but there is more to it When you want to choose between Exception and Return codes.

Historically speaking the argument was, exception ensures that code is forced to handle the situation whereas return codes can be ignored, i never favoured these arguments as no programmer will want to ignore and break their codes on purpose - especially a good test team / or a well written test case will definitely not ignore return codes.

From modern programming practices point of view, managing exceptions need to be looked not only for their cost but also for their viability.

1st. Since most front end will be disconnected from the API that is throwing exception. eg a mobile app utilising rest api. The same api can also be used for an angular js based web frontend.

Either scenario will prefer Return Codes instead of exception.

2nd. Now a days hackers randomly attempt to break all web utilities. In such scenario if they are constantly attacking your apps login api and if the app is constantly throwing exception then you will end up dealing with thousands of exceptions a day. Ofcourse many will say firewall will take care of such attacks, however not all are spending money to manage a dedicated firewall or an expensive anti-spam service, it is better that your code is prepared for these scenarios.

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