71

Is it possible to setup UIImageView to handle image orientation? When I set the UIImageView to image with orientation RIGHT (it is photo from camera roll), the image is rotated to right, but I want to show it in proper orientation, as it was taken.

I know I can rotate image data but it is possible to do it more elegant?

Thank you

13 Answers 13

132

If I understand, what you want to do is disregard the orientation of the UIImage? If so then you could do this:

UIImage *originalImage = [... whatever ...];

UIImage *imageToDisplay =
     [UIImage imageWithCGImage:[originalImage CGImage]
              scale:[originalImage scale]
              orientation: UIImageOrientationUp];

So you're creating a new UIImage with the same pixel data as the original (referenced via its CGImage property) but you're specifying an orientation that doesn't rotate the data.

  • 3
    By the way, how can I actually rotate the image data? – Wang Liang Mar 8 '12 at 7:19
  • 6
    I guess you'd create a suitably sized CGContext with CGBitmapContextCreate (or with the UIGraphicsBeginImageContext shorthand), use CGContextRotateCTM to set a rotation, use either drawInRect: on the UIImage or CGContextDrawImage with the image's CGImage property, then convert the context to an image either with UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext (and, then, UIGraphicsEndImageContext) if you used UIKit to create the context, or CGBitmapContextCreateImage if you were sticking with the Core Graphics. UIKit isn't very thread safe, but the code would be neater. – Tommy Mar 8 '12 at 20:31
  • I can't get this to work when I put the image in an ImageView...it just displays the image with it's original orientation even though I'm creating the image with mirrored orientation: [UIImage imageWithCGImage:image.CGImage scale:image.scale orientation:UIImageOrientationUpMirrored]...the OP asked about using an ImageView but I can't get this solution to work in an ImageView... – Ethan G Oct 13 '17 at 14:05
42

You can completely avoid manually doing the transforms and scaling yourself, as suggested by an0 in this answer here:

- (UIImage *)normalizedImage {
    if (self.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationUp) return self; 

    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.size, NO, self.scale);
    [self drawInRect:(CGRect){0, 0, self.size}];
    UIImage *normalizedImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return normalizedImage;
}

The documentation for the UIImage methods size and drawInRect explicitly states that they take into account orientation.

  • 1
    This is a life saver. – Quark Nov 24 '17 at 21:44
23

I converted the code in Anomie's answer here (copy-pasted above by suvish valsan) into Swift:

func fixOrientation() -> UIImage {
    if self.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientation.Up {
        return self
    }

    var transform = CGAffineTransformIdentity

    switch self.imageOrientation {
    case .Down, .DownMirrored:
        transform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(transform, self.size.width, self.size.height)
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, CGFloat(M_PI));

    case .Left, .LeftMirrored:
        transform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(transform, self.size.width, 0);
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, CGFloat(M_PI_2));

    case .Right, .RightMirrored:
        transform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(transform, 0, self.size.height);
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, CGFloat(-M_PI_2));

    case .Up, .UpMirrored:
        break
    }

    switch self.imageOrientation {

    case .UpMirrored, .DownMirrored:
        transform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(transform, self.size.width, 0)
        transform = CGAffineTransformScale(transform, -1, 1)

    case .LeftMirrored, .RightMirrored:
        transform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(transform, self.size.height, 0)
        transform = CGAffineTransformScale(transform, -1, 1);

    default:
        break;
    }

    // Now we draw the underlying CGImage into a new context, applying the transform
    // calculated above.
    let ctx = CGBitmapContextCreate(
        nil,
        Int(self.size.width),
        Int(self.size.height),
        CGImageGetBitsPerComponent(self.CGImage),
        0,
        CGImageGetColorSpace(self.CGImage),
        UInt32(CGImageGetBitmapInfo(self.CGImage).rawValue)
    )

    CGContextConcatCTM(ctx, transform);

    switch self.imageOrientation {
    case .Left, .LeftMirrored, .Right, .RightMirrored:
        // Grr...
        CGContextDrawImage(ctx, CGRectMake(0, 0, self.size.height,self.size.width), self.CGImage);

    default:
        CGContextDrawImage(ctx, CGRectMake(0, 0, self.size.width,self.size.height), self.CGImage);
        break;
    }

    // And now we just create a new UIImage from the drawing context
    let cgimg = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(ctx)

    let img = UIImage(CGImage: cgimg!)

    return img;
}

(I replaced all occurencies of the parameter image with self, because my code is an extension on UIImage).


EDIT: Swift 3 version.

The method returns an optional, because many of the intermediate calls can fail and I don't like to use !.

func fixOrientation() -> UIImage? {

    guard let cgImage = self.cgImage else {
        return nil
    }

    if self.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientation.up {
        return self
    }

    let width  = self.size.width
    let height = self.size.height

    var transform = CGAffineTransform.identity

    switch self.imageOrientation {
    case .down, .downMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: width, y: height)
        transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat.pi)

    case .left, .leftMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: width, y: 0)
        transform = transform.rotated(by: 0.5*CGFloat.pi)

    case .right, .rightMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: 0, y: height)
        transform = transform.rotated(by: -0.5*CGFloat.pi)

    case .up, .upMirrored:
        break
    }

    switch self.imageOrientation {
    case .upMirrored, .downMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: width, y: 0)
        transform = transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1)

    case .leftMirrored, .rightMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: height, y: 0)
        transform = transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1)

    default:
        break;
    }

    // Now we draw the underlying CGImage into a new context, applying the transform
    // calculated above.
    guard let colorSpace = cgImage.colorSpace else {
        return nil
    }

    guard let context = CGContext(
        data: nil,
        width: Int(width),
        height: Int(height),
        bitsPerComponent: cgImage.bitsPerComponent,
        bytesPerRow: 0,
        space: colorSpace,
        bitmapInfo: UInt32(cgImage.bitmapInfo.rawValue)
        ) else {
            return nil
    }

    context.concatenate(transform);

    switch self.imageOrientation {

    case .left, .leftMirrored, .right, .rightMirrored:
        // Grr...
        context.draw(cgImage, in: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: height, height: width))

    default:
        context.draw(cgImage, in: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: width, height: height))
    }

    // And now we just create a new UIImage from the drawing context
    guard let newCGImg = context.makeImage() else {
        return nil
    }

    let img = UIImage(cgImage: newCGImg)

    return img;
}

(Note: Swift 3 version odes compile under Xcode 8.1, but haven't tested it actually works. There might be a typo somewhere, mixed up width/height, etc. Feel free to point/fix any errors).

  • I have used above code after converting to swift 3.Check my answer below if anybody needs swift 3 version – Waseem05 Oct 26 '16 at 8:11
  • Image orientation not changed at all. Sorry, i am new to iOS development. What i did are, i use the function to UIImage extension, then set it programmatically inside func viewDidLoad. This image is from samsung phone photos.google.com/share/… and has 270 CW orientation exif data. Here how i use it let background: UIImage? = UIImage(named: "background_image")?.fixOrientation() backgroundImage.image = background – HendraWD Jan 17 '17 at 6:00
  • Anyone getting memory leak issues using this @Nicolas? looks like the CGImages are not being deallocated. My app is a mass photo management app and deals with many photos. This function appears to be leaking memory every time it is run. Are there any quick fixes for this? – Michael Reilly Jul 25 '17 at 16:21
  • @MichaelReilly Hmm, havnen't looked at it in detail, but the CoreGraphics calls should work with ARC in swift. – Nicolas Miari Jul 26 '17 at 1:33
  • @MichaelReilly I found this answer, which seems to corroborate my observation: stackoverflow.com/a/25790214/433373 – Nicolas Miari Jul 26 '17 at 1:35
19

This method first checks the current orientation of UIImage and then it changes the orientation in a clockwise way and return UIImage.You can show this image as

self.imageView.image = rotateImage(currentUIImage)

   func rotateImage(image:UIImage)->UIImage
    {
        var rotatedImage = UIImage();
        switch image.imageOrientation
        {
            case UIImageOrientation.Right:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(CGImage:image.CGImage!, scale: 1, orientation:UIImageOrientation.Down);

           case UIImageOrientation.Down:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(CGImage:image.CGImage!, scale: 1, orientation:UIImageOrientation.Left);

            case UIImageOrientation.Left:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(CGImage:image.CGImage!, scale: 1, orientation:UIImageOrientation.Up);

             default:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(CGImage:image.CGImage!, scale: 1, orientation:UIImageOrientation.Right);
        }
        return rotatedImage;
    }

Swift 4 version

func rotateImage(image:UIImage) -> UIImage
    {
        var rotatedImage = UIImage()
        switch image.imageOrientation
        {
        case .right:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(cgImage: image.cgImage!, scale: 1.0, orientation: .down)

        case .down:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(cgImage: image.cgImage!, scale: 1.0, orientation: .left)

        case .left:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(cgImage: image.cgImage!, scale: 1.0, orientation: .up)

        default:
            rotatedImage = UIImage(cgImage: image.cgImage!, scale: 1.0, orientation: .right)
        }

        return rotatedImage
    }
  • Hi Varender, and thanks for helping on SO. Could you develop a little on how you think this might help Martin? How more elegant than rotating data is your solution? – J. Chomel May 18 '16 at 7:49
  • 1. we will take the current UIImage from the UIImageView 2.we will call this method (rotateImage) and passing this current UIImage as an argument 3. storing the returned value into UIImageView.image /* this will rotate the data within image view :) :) – varender singh May 18 '16 at 8:26
  • sir according to me it's the best answer because if we will rotate the whole UIImageView then the UIImageView X be a negative value . But If we rotate the data then the UIImageView will stay in place and only the data will be rotated.If you take a square UIImageView then you can simply transform the whole UIImageView using CGAffineTransformMakeRotate. – varender singh May 18 '16 at 12:03
  • This should be the accepted answer! Worked like a charm :) – Ely Dantas Aug 24 '17 at 16:33
  • in swift 3 : rotatedImage = UIImage(cgImage:image.cgImage!, scale: 1, orientation:UIImageOrientation.right) – Ansal Antony Sep 6 '17 at 11:32
13

Swift 3.1

func fixImageOrientation(_ image: UIImage)->UIImage {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(image.size)
    image.draw(at: .zero)
    let newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
    return newImage ?? image
}
  • This is a perfect solution :) – miff Aug 29 '17 at 14:10
  • you deserve all the bits my friend – Mitchell Gant Oct 16 '17 at 14:05
  • This is the right way – Raniys Oct 29 '17 at 3:57
  • 1
    Nice solutions :), work in swift 4 – Ramadhan Oct 18 '18 at 9:04
  • This is better than that. This works in swift 4, but that doesn't. – AechoLiu Nov 16 '18 at 6:56
8

here is a workable sample cod, considering the image orientation:

#define rad(angle) ((angle) / 180.0 * M_PI)
- (CGAffineTransform)orientationTransformedRectOfImage:(UIImage *)img
{
    CGAffineTransform rectTransform;
    switch (img.imageOrientation)
    {
        case UIImageOrientationLeft:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(rad(90)), 0, -img.size.height);
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationRight:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(rad(-90)), -img.size.width, 0);
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationDown:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(rad(-180)), -img.size.width, -img.size.height);
            break;
        default:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformIdentity;
    };

    return CGAffineTransformScale(rectTransform, img.scale, img.scale);
}


- (UIImage *)croppedImage:(UIImage*)orignialImage InRect:(CGRect)visibleRect{
    //transform visible rect to image orientation
    CGAffineTransform rectTransform = [self orientationTransformedRectOfImage:orignialImage];
    visibleRect = CGRectApplyAffineTransform(visibleRect, rectTransform);

    //crop image
    CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect([orignialImage CGImage], visibleRect);
    UIImage *result = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef scale:orignialImage.scale orientation:orignialImage.imageOrientation];
    CGImageRelease(imageRef);
    return result;
}
7

UIImage extension in Swift. You don't need to do all that flipping at all, really. Objective-C original is here, but I've added the bit that respects the alpha of the original image (crudely, but it works to differentiate opaque images from transparent images).

// from https://github.com/mbcharbonneau/UIImage-Categories/blob/master/UIImage%2BAlpha.m
// Returns true if the image has an alpha layer
    private func hasAlpha() -> Bool {
        guard let cg = self.cgImage else { return false }
        let alpha = cg.alphaInfo
        let retVal = (alpha == .first || alpha == .last || alpha == .premultipliedFirst || alpha == .premultipliedLast)
        return retVal
    }

    func normalizedImage() -> UIImage? {
        if self.imageOrientation == .up {
            return self
        }
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.size, !self.hasAlpha(), self.scale)
        var rect = CGRect.zero
        rect.size = self.size
        self.draw(in: rect)
        let retVal = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
        UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
        return retVal
    }
6

I converted the code from @Nicolas Miari answer to Swift 3 in case anybody needs it

func fixOrientation() -> UIImage
{

    if self.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientation.up {
        return self
    }

    var transform = CGAffineTransform.identity

    switch self.imageOrientation {
    case .down, .downMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.width, y: self.size.height)
        transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat(M_PI));

    case .left, .leftMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.width, y: 0);
        transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat(M_PI_2));

    case .right, .rightMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: 0, y: self.size.height);
        transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat(-M_PI_2));

    case .up, .upMirrored:
        break
    }


    switch self.imageOrientation {

    case .upMirrored, .downMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.width, y: 0)
        transform = transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1)

    case .leftMirrored, .rightMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.height, y: 0)
        transform = transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1);

    default:
        break;
    }

    // Now we draw the underlying CGImage into a new context, applying the transform
    // calculated above.
    let ctx = CGContext(
        data: nil,
        width: Int(self.size.width),
        height: Int(self.size.height),
        bitsPerComponent: self.cgImage!.bitsPerComponent,
        bytesPerRow: 0,
        space: self.cgImage!.colorSpace!,
        bitmapInfo: UInt32(self.cgImage!.bitmapInfo.rawValue)
    )



    ctx!.concatenate(transform);

    switch self.imageOrientation {

    case .left, .leftMirrored, .right, .rightMirrored:
        // Grr...
        ctx?.draw(self.cgImage!, in: CGRect(x:0 ,y: 0 ,width: self.size.height ,height:self.size.width))

    default:
        ctx?.draw(self.cgImage!, in: CGRect(x:0 ,y: 0 ,width: self.size.width ,height:self.size.height))
        break;
    }

    // And now we just create a new UIImage from the drawing context
    let cgimg = ctx!.makeImage()

    let img = UIImage(cgImage: cgimg!)

    return img;

}
  • After capture the image in Delegate methods imagePickerController(_ picker: UIImagePickerController, didFinishPickingMediaWithInfo info: [String : Any] let imageCaptured:UIImage = info[UIImagePickerControllerOriginalImage] as! UIImage image is always rightOrientation and this method is returning back image :( – Sumeet Mourya Mar 31 '17 at 14:58
  • Yes image orientation is alway .right but It displays correctly on UIImageView. Apple has some internal data which is used here to display corrrectly – Waseem05 Apr 5 '17 at 6:16
3

Thanks to Waseem05 for his Swift 3 translation but his method only worked for me when I wrapped it inside an extension to UIImage and placed it outside/below the parent class like so:

extension UIImage {

        func fixOrientation() -> UIImage
        {

            if self.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientation.up {
            return self
        }

        var transform = CGAffineTransform.identity

        switch self.imageOrientation {
        case .down, .downMirrored:
            transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.width, y: self.size.height)
            transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat(M_PI));

        case .left, .leftMirrored:
            transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.width, y: 0);
            transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat(M_PI_2));

        case .right, .rightMirrored:
            transform = transform.translatedBy(x: 0, y: self.size.height);
            transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat(-M_PI_2));

        case .up, .upMirrored:
            break
        }


        switch self.imageOrientation {

        case .upMirrored, .downMirrored:
            transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.width, y: 0)
            transform = transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1)

        case .leftMirrored, .rightMirrored:
            transform = transform.translatedBy(x: self.size.height, y: 0)
            transform = transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1);

        default:
            break;
        }

        // Now we draw the underlying CGImage into a new context, applying the transform
        // calculated above.
        let ctx = CGContext(
            data: nil,
            width: Int(self.size.width),
            height: Int(self.size.height),
            bitsPerComponent: self.cgImage!.bitsPerComponent,
            bytesPerRow: 0,
            space: self.cgImage!.colorSpace!,
            bitmapInfo: UInt32(self.cgImage!.bitmapInfo.rawValue)
        )



        ctx!.concatenate(transform);

        switch self.imageOrientation {

        case .left, .leftMirrored, .right, .rightMirrored:
            // Grr...
            ctx?.draw(self.cgImage!, in: CGRect(x:0 ,y: 0 ,width: self.size.height ,height:self.size.width))

        default:
            ctx?.draw(self.cgImage!, in: CGRect(x:0 ,y: 0 ,width: self.size.width ,height:self.size.height))
            break;
        }

        // And now we just create a new UIImage from the drawing context
        let cgimg = ctx!.makeImage()

        let img = UIImage(cgImage: cgimg!)

        return img;

    }
}

Then called it with:

let correctedImage:UIImage = wonkyImage.fixOrientation()

And all was then well! Apple should make it easier to discard orientation when we don't need front/back camera and up/down/left/right device orientation metadata.

2

If you need to rotate and fix the image orientation below extension would be useful.

extension UIImage {

public func imageRotatedByDegrees(degrees: CGFloat) -> UIImage {
    //Calculate the size of the rotated view's containing box for our drawing space
    let rotatedViewBox: UIView = UIView(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: self.size.width, height: self.size.height))
    let t: CGAffineTransform = CGAffineTransform(rotationAngle: degrees * CGFloat.pi / 180)
    rotatedViewBox.transform = t
    let rotatedSize: CGSize = rotatedViewBox.frame.size
    //Create the bitmap context
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(rotatedSize)
    let bitmap: CGContext = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()!
    //Move the origin to the middle of the image so we will rotate and scale around the center.
    bitmap.translateBy(x: rotatedSize.width / 2, y: rotatedSize.height / 2)
    //Rotate the image context
    bitmap.rotate(by: (degrees * CGFloat.pi / 180))
    //Now, draw the rotated/scaled image into the context
    bitmap.scaleBy(x: 1.0, y: -1.0)
    bitmap.draw(self.cgImage!, in: CGRect(x: -self.size.width / 2, y: -self.size.height / 2, width: self.size.width, height: self.size.height))
    let newImage: UIImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()!
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
    return newImage
}


public func fixedOrientation() -> UIImage {
    if imageOrientation == UIImageOrientation.up {
        return self
    }

    var transform: CGAffineTransform = CGAffineTransform.identity

    switch imageOrientation {
    case UIImageOrientation.down, UIImageOrientation.downMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: size.width, y: size.height)
        transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat.pi)
        break
    case UIImageOrientation.left, UIImageOrientation.leftMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: size.width, y: 0)
        transform = transform.rotated(by: CGFloat.pi/2)
        break
    case UIImageOrientation.right, UIImageOrientation.rightMirrored:
        transform = transform.translatedBy(x: 0, y: size.height)
        transform = transform.rotated(by: -CGFloat.pi/2)
        break
    case UIImageOrientation.up, UIImageOrientation.upMirrored:
        break
    }

    switch imageOrientation {
    case UIImageOrientation.upMirrored, UIImageOrientation.downMirrored:
        transform.translatedBy(x: size.width, y: 0)
        transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1)
        break
    case UIImageOrientation.leftMirrored, UIImageOrientation.rightMirrored:
        transform.translatedBy(x: size.height, y: 0)
        transform.scaledBy(x: -1, y: 1)
    case UIImageOrientation.up, UIImageOrientation.down, UIImageOrientation.left, UIImageOrientation.right:
        break
    }

    let ctx: CGContext = CGContext(data: nil,
                                   width: Int(size.width),
                                   height: Int(size.height),
                                   bitsPerComponent: self.cgImage!.bitsPerComponent,
                                   bytesPerRow: 0,
                                   space: self.cgImage!.colorSpace!,
                                   bitmapInfo: CGImageAlphaInfo.premultipliedLast.rawValue)!

    ctx.concatenate(transform)

    switch imageOrientation {
    case UIImageOrientation.left, UIImageOrientation.leftMirrored, UIImageOrientation.right, UIImageOrientation.rightMirrored:
        ctx.draw(self.cgImage!, in: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: size.height, height: size.width))
    default:
        ctx.draw(self.cgImage!, in: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: size.width, height: size.height))
        break
    }

    let cgImage: CGImage = ctx.makeImage()!

    return UIImage(cgImage: cgImage)
}

}

1

Swift 3.0 version of Tommy's answer

let imageToDisplay = UIImage.init(cgImage: originalImage.cgImage!, scale: originalImage.scale, orientation: UIImageOrientation.up)
1
extension UIImage {
    func fixImageOrientation() -> UIImage {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(self.size)
        self.draw(at: .zero)
        let newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
        UIGraphicsEndImageContext()
        return newImage ?? self
    }
}
  1. Create extension like top example.
  2. Call it: imageView.image?.fixImageOrientation() or UIImage(named: "someImage").fixImageOrientation()

  3. Good luck all!

  • 1
    This worked for me like a charm! – Ashald Dec 8 '18 at 21:10
0

Inspired from @Aqua Answer.....

in Objective C

- (UIImage *)fixImageOrientation:(UIImage *)img {

   UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(img.size);
   [img drawAtPoint:CGPointZero];

   UIImage *newImg = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
   UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

   if (newImg) {
       return newImg;
   }

   return img;
}

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