5

I have a vector of pointers to a class. I need to call their destructors and free their memory. Since they are vector of pointers vector.clear() does not do the job.So I went on to do it manually like so :

void Population::clearPool(std::vector<Chromosome*> a,int size)
{
    Chromosome* c;
    for(int j = 0 ;j < size-1;j++)
    {
       c = a.back();
       a.pop_back();
       delete c;
       printf("  %d \n\r",j);
       c = NULL;

    }

}

The printf in there is since I have a talking destructor to see in which Chromosome the segmentation fault happens. When clearPool() is called and say we got a size of 100, it can give a segmentation fault in any Chromosome between 0 and 100.

I have no idea why this might be happening nor do I have a way to actually find what's wrong since while debugging with breakpoints all I see is that it happens in there at random chromosomes.

I am using codeblocks IDE and the gdb debugger. The stack trace when the segmentation fault happens has 4 memory addresses and a function wsncpy().

1
  • There are very few situations where you'd like to pass a container like vector by value into a function. You should pass it by reference.
    – amit kumar
    May 21, 2009 at 9:12

10 Answers 10

21
void Population::clearPool( std::vector <Chromosome*> & a )
{
   for ( int i = 0; i < a.size(); i++ ) {
      delete a[i];
   }
   a.clear();
}

Notice that the vector is passed by reference. In your code, a copy of the vector is used, which means that it is unchanged in the calling program. Because you delete the pointers in the copy, the pointers in the original are now all invalid - I suspect you are using those invalid pointers in some way not shown in the code you posted.

As a couple of template solutions have been posted that use C++ library algorithms, you might also want to consider a template solution that does not:

template <class C> void FreeClear( C & cntr ) {
    for ( typename C::iterator it = cntr.begin(); 
              it != cntr.end(); ++it ) {
        delete * it;
    }
    cntr.clear();
}

Using this you can free any container of dynamically allocated objects:

vector <Chromosome *> vc;
list <Chromosome *> lc;
// populate & use
FreeClear( lc );
FreeClear( vc );
10
  • Neil, it doesn't explain why he's getting seg faults while deleting items in the list though? (or does it, I'm asking). Unless he's deleting the list twice? May 21, 2009 at 8:47
  • It probably does. He deletes the pointers in the copy, but hangs on to those in the original, which are now invalid, and uses them somehow.
    – anon
    May 21, 2009 at 8:50
  • First of all thanks for the very fast replies, I did change the vector to a reference but I still get the same faults. As for the rest of the code yes it is a lot clearer than what I wrote but it does the same thing, right? I will have to look at the code again to see if what binary worrier said is true. It can be the only other logical explanation even though I already scanned for such an error.
    – Lefteris
    May 21, 2009 at 8:52
  • I would guess that size is not being set correctly in your calling code. and why do you use "j < size - 1" rather than "j < size"?
    – anon
    May 21, 2009 at 8:56
  • Oh that was nothing, I use size normally just when I copied-pasted the code here I was trying something. Size is set correctly to 100 from the very start of the program, and I did check it again to make sure after your comments. I am still trying to find it, I will get back here if I find anything.
    – Lefteris
    May 21, 2009 at 8:58
5

Slight modified version compared to (@1800 INFORMATION).

  struct DeleteFromVector
    {
        template <class T>
        void operator() ( T* ptr) const
        {
            delete ptr;
        }
    };


std::for_each(aVec.begin(), aVec.end(), DeleteFromVector());
2
  • 2
    +1 for not having to specify the type at call-site. DeleteFromVector isn't a good name, though - it's not specific to vector in any way. May 21, 2009 at 9:10
  • yeah, DeleteObjectFunctor might be more suitable.
    – aJ.
    May 21, 2009 at 9:13
3

I don't know why you are crashing, but I guess that one possibility is that the size of the vector is not the same as the size you are passing in. Also I notice you are iterating from 0 to size-2, do you not mean to go all the way to the end?

One way to delete all of the items in the array using idiomatic C++ is something like this:

template<class T>
class deleter
{
  public:
    void operator()(const T* it) const
    {
      delete it;
    }
};

std::for_each(a.begin(), a.end(), deleter<Chromosome>());
3
  • that might be possible, I was focussing on the area where I thought the issue might lie May 21, 2009 at 9:03
  • Doesn't really matter that much, but I'd generally make the member function of the functor const. May 21, 2009 at 9:09
  • I wish there was a one-liner for this May 21, 2009 at 9:10
3

Boost lambda already has a functor for deleting sequences of pointers, by the way:

std::for_each(a.begin(), a.end(), boost::lambda::delete_ptr());
1

Are you sure that each pointer in the vector points to a different object? (i.e. that two pointers don't both point to the same object, which you're trying to delete twice.

Are you sure that you don't delete some of the pointers before calling this method? (i.e. are you sure that each pointer in the list points to a valid object?)

1

The most likely reason is calling delete twice for the same address. This can happen if you added one object more than once to the vector. To detect this insert some statement that will output the address of the object you will then delete.

printf( "will delete %d\n", (int)c );
delete c;
1
  • Better: printf( "will delete %p\n", c );
    – anon
    May 21, 2009 at 9:36
1

I found the problem.

It was in the most well hidden (by none other than stupid old me) place it could be.

As some might have guessed this is a genetic algorithms program. It is for a tutorial I am making. I was choosing the crossover points for the chromosomes randomly from a roulette wheel function which I made. Well ... inside there, there was a -1 which should not be there. That destroyed literally everything, and eventually lead to a segmentation fault.

Thank you all for your help, I saw some really good practises in this post which I intend to follow

0

I recommend to use smart pointer (ie:auto_ptr) instead of raw pointer and just use vector::clear method that will call the destructor for each element

2
  • 4
    do not use auto_ptr in combination with std container classes. You will encounter ownership issues and loss of sanity May 21, 2009 at 9:03
  • Agreed. Use shared_ptr from Boost or tr1, but NOT auto_ptr. May 21, 2009 at 17:28
0
void Population::clearPool(std::vector<Chromosome*>& a)
{
    for(size_t i = 0; i < a.size(); i++) {
        delete a[i];
    }

    a.clear();
}
1
  • 2
    You need to pass a reference to the vector - your code just changes the local copy.
    – anon
    May 21, 2009 at 8:44
0

It seems, that some pointers in your code do not reference correct Chromosome objects. This may happen, if you try to delete some objects twice as a result of code:

Population p;
vector<Chromosome*> chromosomes;
p.clearPool(chromosomes,chromosomes.size()); // You pass by value, so chromosomes is not changed
p.clearPool(chromosomes,chromosomes.size()); // Delete already deleted objects second time

You may find useful ptr_vector from Boost Pointer Container Library in order to avoid similar errors

0

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