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numpy has irr and npv function, but I need xirr and xnpv function.

this link points out that xirr and xnpv will be coming soon. http://www.projectdirigible.com/documentation/spreadsheet-functions.html#coming-soon

Is there any python library that has those two functions? tks.

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With the help of various implementations I found in the net, I came up with a python implementation:

def xirr(transactions):
    years = [(ta[0] - transactions[0][0]).days / 365.0 for ta in transactions]
    residual = 1
    step = 0.05
    guess = 0.05
    epsilon = 0.0001
    limit = 10000
    while abs(residual) > epsilon and limit > 0:
        limit -= 1
        residual = 0.0
        for i, ta in enumerate(transactions):
            residual += ta[1] / pow(guess, years[i])
        if abs(residual) > epsilon:
            if residual > 0:
                guess += step
            else:
                guess -= step
                step /= 2.0
    return guess-1

from datetime import date
tas = [ (date(2010, 12, 29), -10000),
    (date(2012, 1, 25), 20),
    (date(2012, 3, 8), 10100)]
print xirr(tas) #0.0100612640381
| improve this answer | |
  • WARNING: If you use these step and guess values, it will be impossible to obtain an irr in (-100%, -95%) – michael_j_ward Sep 5 '17 at 16:59
  • Since this is still one of the top search results for XIRR in Python, I feel it needs to be said that this calculation is not direction agnostic. It assumes inflow as negative and outflow as positive. If you reverse this, this doesn't work. – gouravkr May 11 at 3:55
12
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Here is one way to implement the two functions.

import scipy.optimize

def xnpv(rate, values, dates):
    '''Equivalent of Excel's XNPV function.

    >>> from datetime import date
    >>> dates = [date(2010, 12, 29), date(2012, 1, 25), date(2012, 3, 8)]
    >>> values = [-10000, 20, 10100]
    >>> xnpv(0.1, values, dates)
    -966.4345...
    '''
    if rate <= -1.0:
        return float('inf')
    d0 = dates[0]    # or min(dates)
    return sum([ vi / (1.0 + rate)**((di - d0).days / 365.0) for vi, di in zip(values, dates)])

def xirr(values, dates):
    '''Equivalent of Excel's XIRR function.

    >>> from datetime import date
    >>> dates = [date(2010, 12, 29), date(2012, 1, 25), date(2012, 3, 8)]
    >>> values = [-10000, 20, 10100]
    >>> xirr(values, dates)
    0.0100612...
    '''
    try:
        return scipy.optimize.newton(lambda r: xnpv(r, values, dates), 0.0)
    except RuntimeError:    # Failed to converge?
        return scipy.optimize.brentq(lambda r: xnpv(r, values, dates), -1.0, 1e10)
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you explain why your XNPV function returns infinity for any rate below -1.0 (-100%)? I understand the case for -100% exactly, but the exponentiation operator binds before the division, so you will not get a division by zero for rates not equal exactly -100%. For example at a rate of 105% a $100 payment a year from now has a NPV = 100 / (1 + 1.05) ** 1 = $48.78... The same future payment at a rate of -5% is around -$105 (100 / (1 - .05) ** 1). Currently some bonds "pay" negative rate so this is not just theoretical. Now consider rate -105%, and we get 100 / (1 - 1.05) ** 1 = -1999.999... – Victor Olex Sep 19 '19 at 22:00
  • What about 100/(1-1.05)**2 = 40000? Would it make sense? As far as bonds with negative rate go, could it be the case that you are talking about rates less than 0 here, not rates less than -100%? – KT. Sep 24 '19 at 11:10
  • 1
    I've made the following improvement that seems to converge faster and more accurately. Basically it uses a guess based in gross return as a starting point for the newton method. ``` def xirr(values, dates): positives = [x if x > 0 else 0 for x in values] negatives = [x if x < 0 else 0 for x in values] return_guess = (sum(positives) + sum(negatives)) / (-sum(negatives)) try: return scipy.optimize.newton(lambda r: xnpv(r, values, dates), return_guess) ``` – alphazeta Apr 1 at 17:38
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With Pandas, I got the following to work: (note, I'm using ACT/365 convention)

rate = 0.10
dates= pandas.date_range(start=pandas.Timestamp('2015-01-01'),periods=5, freq="AS")
cfs = pandas.Series([-500,200,200,200,200],index=dates)

# intermediate calculations( if interested)
# cf_xnpv_days = [(cf.index[i]-cf.index[i-1]).days for i in range(1,len(cf.index))]
# cf_xnpv_days_cumulative = [(cf.index[i]-cf.index[0]).days for i in range(1,len(cf.index))]
# cf_xnpv_days_disc_factors = [(1+rate)**(float((cf.index[i]-cf.index[0]).days)/365.0)-1   for i in range(1,len(cf.index))]

cf_xnpv_days_pvs = [cf[i]/float(1+(1+rate)**(float((cf.index[i]-cf.index[0]).days)/365.0)-1)  for i in range(1,len(cf.index))]

cf_xnpv = cf[0]+ sum(cf_xnpv_days_pvs)
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0
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This answer is an improvement on @uuazed's answer and derives from that. However, there are a few changes:

  1. It uses a pandas dataframe instead of a list of tuples
  2. It is cashflow direction agnostic, i.e., whether you treat inflows as negative and outflows as positive or vice versa, the result will be the same, as long as the treatment is consistent for all transactions.
  3. XIRR calculation with this method doesn't work if cashflows are not ordered by date. Hence I have handled sorting of the dataframe internally.
  4. In the earlier answer, there was an implicit assumption that XIRR will mostly be positive. which created the problem pointed out in the other comment, that XIRR between -100% and -95% cannot be calculated. This solution does away with that problem.
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

def xirr(df, guess=0.05, date_column = 'date', amount_column = 'amount'):
    '''Calculates XIRR from a series of cashflows. 
       Needs a dataframe with columns date and amount, customisable through parameters. 
       Requires Pandas, NumPy libraries'''

    df = df.sort_values(by=date_column).reset_index(drop=True)
    df['years'] = df[date_column].apply(lambda x: (x-df[date_column][0]).days/365)
    step = 0.05
    epsilon = 0.0001
    limit = 1000
    residual = 1

    #Test for direction of cashflows
    disc_val_1 = df[[amount_column, 'years']].apply(
                lambda x: x[amount_column]/((1+guess)**x['years']), axis=1).sum()
    disc_val_2 = df[[amount_column, 'years']].apply(
                lambda x: x[amount_column]/((1.05+guess)**x['years']), axis=1).sum()
    mul = 1 if disc_val_2 < disc_val_1 else -1

    #Calculate XIRR    
    for i in range(limit):
        prev_residual = residual
        df['disc_val'] = df[[amount_column, 'years']].apply(
                lambda x: x[amount_column]/((1+guess)**x['years']), axis=1)
        residual = df['disc_val'].sum()
        if abs(residual) > epsilon:
            if np.sign(residual) != np.sign(prev_residual):
                step /= 2
            guess = guess + step * np.sign(residual) * mul   
        else:
            return guess

Explanation:

In the test block, it checks whether increasing the discounting rate increases the discounted value or reduces it. Based on this test, it is determined which direction the guess should move. This block makes the function handle cashflows regardless of direction assumed by the user.

The np.sign(residual) != np.sign(prev_residual) checks when the guess has increased/decreased beyond the required XIRR rate, because that's when the residual goes from negative to positive or vice versa. The step size is reduced at this point.

The numpy package is not absolutely necessary. without numpy, np.sign(residual) can be replaced with residual/abs(residual). I have used numpy to make the code more readable and intuitive

I have tried to test this code with a variety of cash flows. If you find any cases which are not handled by this function, do let me know.

Edit: Here's a cleaner and faster version of the code using numpy arrays. In my test with about 700 transaction, this code ran 5 times faster than the one above:

def xirr(df, guess=0.05, date_column='date', amount_column='amount'):
    '''Calculates XIRR from a series of cashflows. 
       Needs a dataframe with columns date and amount, customisable through parameters. 
       Requires Pandas, NumPy libraries'''

    df = df.sort_values(by=date_column).reset_index(drop=True)

    amounts = df[amount_column].values
    dates = df[date_column].values

    years = np.array(dates-dates[0], dtype='timedelta64[D]').astype(int)/365

    step = 0.05
    epsilon = 0.0001
    limit = 1000
    residual = 1

    #Test for direction of cashflows
    disc_val_1 = np.sum(amounts/((1+guess)**years))
    disc_val_2 = np.sum(amounts/((1.05+guess)**years))
    mul = 1 if disc_val_2 < disc_val_1 else -1

    #Calculate XIRR    
    for i in range(limit):
        prev_residual = residual
        residual = np.sum(amounts/((1+guess)**years))
        if abs(residual) > epsilon:
            if np.sign(residual) != np.sign(prev_residual):
                step /= 2
            guess = guess + step * np.sign(residual) * mul   
        else:
            return guess
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