1

I created this function CalculateCos:

int Factorial (long int n)
{
    long int r = 1;
    for (int i = 2; i<=n; i++)
    {
        r = r*i;    
    }   

    return r;
}

float CalculateVariable(int CVnumber, int CVloopCounter)
{
    float CVresult = 0;
    CVresult = pow(CVnumber, (CVloopCounter*2)) / (long int)Factorial(CVnumber*2);

    return CVresult;
}

float CalculateCos(int number)
{
    float result = 1;
    int loopCounter = 1;
    int minusOrPlus = 1;
    while(loopCounter <= precision && loopCounter <= 8)
    {
        if(!minusOrPlus)
        {
            result = result - CalculateVariable(number, loopCounter);
            printf("%f\n", result);
            minusOrPlus = 1;
        }
        else
        {
            result = result + CalculateVariable(number, loopCounter);
            printf("%f\n", result);
            minusOrPlus = 0;
        }
        loopCounter++;
      }
      return result;
}

The reason why I printf after the subtraction or adding, is because it gives me strange output, like:

Enter a number, for the cos function
6
1.000000
0.999997
1.000095
0.996588
1.122822
-3.421593
160.177368
-5729.385254
Result is: -5729.3852539
Official function result is:  0.9601703

Can you help me to get correct results on this?

UPDATE:

Now my solution is:

float CalculateCos(float number)
{
    float result = 0;
    float step = 1;
    int loopCounter = 1;

    while(loopCounter <= 5)
    {
        step = step * (-number) * number / (((2*loopCounter)-1)*((2*loopCounter)-2));
        result += step;
        loopCounter++;
    }

    return result;
}
5
  • 3
    Help with what? You didn't even say what the problem is, let alone you haven't posted a self-contained example. Jan 19 '12 at 7:03
  • I'd think something is overflowing or underflowing. Jan 19 '12 at 7:03
  • Please keep the original code and add the new code as the updated part. It helps others to understand the context of your question.
    – pad
    Jan 19 '12 at 9:05
  • You still really need to ask a specific question :)
    – Tim Post
    Jan 19 '12 at 9:20
  • 1
    Your function seems to divide by zero. You can try: double my_cos(double x) { int q = (x * 180 / PI) / 360; x = ((x * 180 / PI)-q*360)*(PI / 180); double ans = 1, step = 1; int lc = 1; while (lc <= 20) { step = step*(-x)*x / ((2 * lc - 1)*(2 * lc)); ans += step; lc++; } return ans; }
    – IronMan007
    Oct 27 '17 at 11:02
7

Current problem:

since your Factorial function returns int and you casts it to long int, its result is going to overflow even before the input goes to 16 in your case (14! > max_int).

You're calculating cos using Taylor series:

cos(x) = 1 - x2/2! + x4/4! - x6/6! + ...

I'm not going to write code. But there are some things wrong in your program, which can be fixed easily:

  1. The input is in radian, so number should be a float.
  2. Calculating each step of Taylor series using exponentiation and factorial separately leads to overflow very soon. The correct way is maintaining a float variable: step = 1 at first and in kth loop iteration step = step * (- x) * x / ((2*k-1)*(2*k)). In this way, you simply add step to result in the loop and don't need minusOrPlus anymore.
  3. The number of loop iterations is bounded by 8 which is too small, so the result could be not precise enough.
  4. I don't see you use precision variable anywhere. It could be used to check precision of the result. For example, when abs(step) < precision, we're going to terminate the loop.
1
  • Sorry for my typo: it should be 2*k rather than 2*k-2 (I updated my answer). And limit of loopCounter should be much bigger than 5. Other than that, your code looks right. Try to test it and compare with built-in cos function.
    – pad
    Jan 19 '12 at 9:10

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