158

I have this small piece of code

String[] words = {"{apf","hum_","dkoe","12f"};
for(String s:words)
{
    if(s.matches("[a-z]"))
    {
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}

Supposed to print

dkoe

but it prints nothing!!

6
  • 47
    Java's matches puts a ^ at the start and a $ at the end of regexes for you. So matches("[a-z]") will actually look for /^[a-z]$/ instead. – Robino Aug 2 '16 at 16:38
  • Yes @Robino you are absolutely right. – Mihir Oct 5 '18 at 7:00
  • 3
    Surely, if you expect matches to look for any occurrence of [a-z], then it should match them all? I would not expect matches to check each and every character individually against the regex. – PhilHibbs Dec 6 '18 at 15:22
  • @Robino: Where is that functionality described/documented? – Toru Apr 3 '20 at 9:17
  • @Toru On the java docs page for String.Matches - where else? A casual Google of "java string matches documentation" reveals, in the top result, the phrase "str.matches(regex) yields exactly the same result as the expression". The important word is "exactly". – Robino Apr 4 '20 at 21:10
351

Welcome to Java's misnamed .matches() method... It tries and matches ALL the input. Unfortunately, other languages have followed suit :(

If you want to see if the regex matches an input text, use a Pattern, a Matcher and the .find() method of the matcher:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[a-z]");
Matcher m = p.matcher(inputstring);
if (m.find())
    // match

If what you want is indeed to see if an input only has lowercase letters, you can use .matches(), but you need to match one or more characters: append a + to your character class, as in [a-z]+. Or use ^[a-z]+$ and .find().

6
  • 2
    i find 100s of incomplete tutorials online. Couldn't find a good one. Do you have any suggestions? – John Jan 19 '12 at 9:33
  • Thanx @fge for explain .matches(). May be you know why .find() works so slow in this example? – Konstantin Konopko Sep 4 '13 at 19:26
  • 4
    What do you mean by other languages followed suit? From what I know, only C++ has an equivalent set of methods - regex_search and regex_match. In Python, re.match only anchors the match at the start of the string (as if it were \Apattern) and Python 3.x has got a nice .fullmatch() method. In JS, Go, PHP and .NET, the there are no regex methods that anchor the match implicitly. ElasticSearch, XML Schema and HTML5/Validators Angluar patterns are always anchored by default. In Swift/Objective C, there is a way to anchor the pattern at the start with an option. – Wiktor Stribiżew Nov 15 '17 at 9:09
  • 2
    That feeling when you waste hours wondering what's wrong with your regex and end up on this SO answer realising that you've already upvoted it long time ago... – matewka Sep 27 '20 at 18:44
  • 1
    It is true String#matches() matches the entire string by default but "123abc".matches("^[0-9]+.*$") or "123abc".matches("[0-9]+.*") works too – Hariharan Mar 26 at 14:10
47

[a-z] matches a single char between a and z. So, if your string was just "d", for example, then it would have matched and been printed out.

You need to change your regex to [a-z]+ to match one or more chars.

1
  • 13
    Of course it matches a single char, that's what that regexp does! What isn't clear however (and should not be the case either!) is that java puts the prefix ^ and suffix $ around the provided regexp, altering it unwantedly and creating weird bugs. They should not do that, because that's not how the initial regexp was meant. – klaar Oct 24 '16 at 14:52
31

String.matches returns whether the whole string matches the regex, not just any substring.

1
  • 3
    Something that is really a sad reality is that you are right. I really don't know why they did it this way. – Hola Soy Edu Feliz Navidad Mar 19 '18 at 17:22
17

java's implementation of regexes try to match the whole string

that's different from perl regexes, which try to find a matching part

if you want to find a string with nothing but lower case characters, use the pattern [a-z]+

if you want to find a string containing at least one lower case character, use the pattern .*[a-z].*

2
13

Used

String[] words = {"{apf","hum_","dkoe","12f"};
    for(String s:words)
    {
        if(s.matches("[a-z]+"))
        {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
5

I have faced the same problem once:

Pattern ptr = Pattern.compile("^[a-zA-Z][\\']?[a-zA-Z\\s]+$");

The above failed!

Pattern ptr = Pattern.compile("(^[a-zA-Z][\\']?[a-zA-Z\\s]+$)");

The above worked with pattern within ( and ).

2

Your regular expression [a-z] doesn't match dkoe since it only matches Strings of lenght 1. Use something like [a-z]+.

-2

you must put at least a capture () in the pattern to match, and correct pattern like this:

String[] words = {"{apf","hum_","dkoe","12f"};
for(String s:words)
{
    if(s.matches("(^[a-z]+$)"))
    {
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
2
  • Brackets didn't change anything. – Touniouk Feb 21 '19 at 17:44
  • @Touniouk without brackets matches not have any output. – MohsenB Feb 23 '19 at 6:54
-3

You can make your pattern case insensitive by doing:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[a-z]+", Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.