39

Imagine an implementation of the IDisposable interface, that has some public methods.

If an instance of that type is shared between multiple threads and one of the threads may dispose it, what is the best way to ensure the other threads do not attempt to work with the instance after disposed? In most cases, after the object is disposed, its methods must be aware of it and throw the ObjectDisposedException or maybe InvalidOperationException or at least inform the calling code for doing something wrong. Do I need synchronization for every method - particularly around the check if it is disposed? Do all IDisposable implementations with other public methods need to be thread-safe?


Here is an example:

public class DummyDisposable : IDisposable
{
    private bool _disposed = false;

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _disposed = true;
        // actual dispose logic
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        // maybe synchronize around the if block?
        if (_disposed)
        {
            throw new ObjectDisposedException("The current instance has been disposed!");
        }

        // DoSomething logic
    }

    public void DoSomethingElse()
    {
         // Same sync logic as in DoSomething() again?
    }
}
12
  • 3
    no, I am not, but since you mentioned - Finalize() is called from a separate GC thread as far as I remember. However, Finalize is called when there are no alive referrers to the object, so thread-safety should not be a consideration then. In MS best practices it is recommended to call Dispose inside Finalize, or at least use almost the same logic - see link. This could lead to calling thread-safety-aware code inside the Finalize() method anyway. Jan 19, 2012 at 14:48
  • 3
    It should be up to the thread which initialized a disposable object to perform its cleanup after it's no longer needed. Why do you let some other thread dispose it? You can only get yourself in trouble that way.
    – vgru
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:17
  • 2
    @Groo: Sometimes the last use of an object may be on a thread other than the one which creates it. For example, suppose one wants to asynchronously play a sound from a file, closing the file after playback is complete. The thread which opens the file may have better things to do than wait around for the sound to finish.
    – supercat
    Jan 19, 2012 at 19:10
  • 2
    @Groo: While it's possible to dedicate a thread to a long-running operation, and have it wait for each part of the operation to complete before proceeding to the next part, a more efficient pattern in many cases is to use asynchronous callbacks fired from Threadpool threads. If one uses a "playback complete" callback to close the audio file, it's entirely possible that the file might get closed on a thread which didn't even exist when the file was opened, or that the thread that opened the file might cease to exist before playback is complete and the file is closed.
    – supercat
    Jan 19, 2012 at 23:28
  • 2
    @Groo: Also, as I commented on another answer, there are some cases where the most natural way to abort a blocking I/O operation is to dispose the resource from underneath it. If that seems icky, consider that some objects allow operations to be aborted without disrupting the overall system state, but the objects whose operations are aborted will become useless. If doing something to an object will render it useless, that action may as well Dispose the object. If an object is disposed while one of its methods is waiting for something to happen, it makes little sense for it to keep waiting.
    – supercat
    Jan 19, 2012 at 23:38

6 Answers 6

20

I tend to use an integer rather than a boolean as your field for storing the disposed status, because then you can use the thread-safe Interlocked class to test if Dispose has already been called.

Something like this:

private int _disposeCount;

public void Dispose()
{
    if (Interlocked.Increment(ref _disposeCount) == 1)
    {
        // disposal code here
    }
}

This ensures that the disposal code is called only once not matter how many times the method is called, and is totally thread safe.

Then each method can quite simply use call this method as a barrier check:

private void ThrowIfDisposed()
{
   if (_disposeCount > 0) throw new ObjectDisposedException(GetType().Name);
}

With regard to synchronising every method - are you saying a simple barrier check won't do - that you want to stop other threads that might be already executing code in the instance. This is a more complex problem. I don't know what your code is doing, but consider if you really need that - will a simple barrier check not do?

If you just meant with regard to the disposed check itself - my example above is fine.

EDIT: to answer the comment "What's the difference between this and a volatile bool flag? It's slightly confusing to have a field named somethingCount and allow it to hold 0 and 1 values only"

Volatile is related to ensuring the read or write operation operation is atomic and safe. It doesn't make the process of assigning and checking a value thread safe. So, for instance, the following is not thread safe despite the volatile:

private volatile bool _disposed;

public void Dispose()
{
    if (!_disposed)
    {
        _disposed = true

        // disposal code here
    }
}

The problem here is that if two threads were close together, the first could check _disposed, read false, enter the code block and get switched out before setting _disposed to true. The second then checks _disposed, sees false and also enters the code block.

Using Interlocked ensures both the assignment and subsequent read are a single atomic operation.

10
  • 1
    What's the difference between this and a volatile bool flag? It's slightly confusing to have a field named somethingCount and allow it to hold 0 and 1 values only.
    – vgru
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:31
  • 4
    @Groo - see edit. It is a pity there aren't any Interlocked overloads for bool - but I'd prefer this thread-safe approach over a non-safe one.
    – Rob Levine
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:40
  • 3
    That makes sense in case multiple threads are trying to dispose an object simultaneously (which would be quite bizarre). But it still makes no guarantees that it will not be disposed in the middle of a different method, right after you've exited ThrowIfDisposed. This would be a more common case IMHO, if you have your object passed to multiple threads.
    – vgru
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:51
  • Yes - "That makes sense in case multiple threads are trying to dispose an object simultaneously" - that is the issue that the Interlocked part is meant to prevent. It is nothing more than a thread safe version of "if (isDisposed)" in Dispose(). The issue of disposal while another thread is inside another method is more complex (as mentioned in my reply). There is nothing to stop you putting more barrier checks inside your critical methods to make them exit early if disposed on another thread. It often only matters if it is using a resource that you need to free.
    – Rob Levine
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:54
  • 3
    @Groo: One circumstance where simultaneous Dispose may occur "naturally" is when aborting I/O operations. If one thread is performing a blocking read on a Socket, for example, and another thread decides the first thread shouldn't wait any longer (e.g. because a user clicked "cancel") the proper way for the second thread to unblock the first thread is to Dispose the socket (which will cause the blocking read to stop waiting and immediately throw an exception). If the first thread was going to Dispose the socket after it finished its operations, both threads might dispose simultaneously.
    – supercat
    Jan 19, 2012 at 19:27
18

The simplest thing you can do is mark the private disposed variable as volatile and inspect it at the beginning of your methods. You can then throw an ObjectDisposedException if the object has already been disposed.

There are two caveats to this:

  1. You shouldn't throw an ObjectDisposedExceptionif the method is an event handler. Instead you should just gracefully exit from the method if that is possible. The reason being is that there exists a race condition where events can be raised after you unsubscribe from them. (See this article by Eric Lippert for more information.)

  2. This doesn't stop your class from being disposed while you are in the middle of executing one of your class methods. So if your class has instance members that can't be accessed after disposal, you're going to need to setup some locking behaviour to ensure access to these resources are controlled.

Microsoft's guidance around IDisposable says you should check for disposed on all methods, but I haven't personally found this necessary. The question really is, is something going to throw an exception or cause unintended side effects if you allow a method to execute after the class is disposed. If the answer is yes, you need to do some work to make sure that doesn't happen.

In terms of whether all IDisposable classes should be thread safe: No. Most of the use cases for disposable classes involve them only ever being accessed by a single thread.

That being said, you may want to investigate why you need your disposable class to be thread safe as it adds a lot of additional complexity. There may be an alternate implementation that allows you to not have to worry about thread safety issues in your disposable class.

5
  • I think it might be wiser to implement either a Singleton or access the object via a proxy if you want to keep things simple.
    – weismat
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:02
  • 13
    Making it volatile won't prevent any of the race conditions. And there are several here.
    – ℍ ℍ
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:10
  • @Henk Yeah, it only solves one race condition at method entry (getting a stale value for the disposed private field). Like I pointed out in #2 above, you still have to deal with the fact that the object can still be disposed at any point in the method execution.
    – Dan Rigby
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:24
  • @weismat, A singleton disposable object will never be re-used in an application lifetime once disposed. I have always considered singletons pattern incompatible with disposing. Could you clarify if you had something else in mind? Jan 19, 2012 at 15:39
  • According to the MSDN learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/garbage-collection/… "a Dispose method should be idempotent, such that it is callable multiple times without throwing an exception"
    – TheWizard
    Aug 27, 2021 at 11:39
17

Most BCL implementations of Dispose are not thread-safe. The idea is that it's up to the caller of Dispose to make sure nobody else is using the instance anymore before it is Disposed. In other words, it pushes the synchronization responsibility upwards. This makes sense, as otherwise now all your other consumers need to handle the boundary case where the object was Disposed while they were using it.

That said, if you want a thread-safe Disposable class, you can just create a lock around every public method (including Dispose) with a check for _disposed at the top. This may become more complicated if you have long-running methods where you don't want to hold the lock for the entire method.

6
  • 14
    Yes, best solution for Dispose-from-multiple threads is: Don't do that.
    – ℍ ℍ
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:02
  • @Henk, to be fair, you really shouldn't ever see ObjectDisposedException either, if you don't have any bugs. Given that this is a debugging tool, though, I think it's reasonable that it not have guaranteed thread-safe behavior (i.e. you could run into other types of exceptions if you're using an object from multiple threads immediately around the time it's being Disposed.)
    – Dan Bryant
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:05
  • 1
    @DanBryant it's not about disposing in multithreaded environment, but execute a call while disposing is in process. We have to throw ObjectDisposedException in this case Jul 3, 2017 at 10:11
  • 1
    Best solution is to implement thread-safety properly, and not be lazy or attempt to "push the responsibility up", which is ridiculous. Dispose should be thread-safe, like all the other methods. That means locks must be used in both Dispose and all other methods. My genius idea is to use a ReaderWriterLock, where Dispose takes out a write lock, and all other methods take out a read lock. As long as the class isn't disposed, there is no contention for the read locks, because there's no limit on how many can be held at once. The write lock in Dispose ensures a single thread executes it.
    – Triynko
    Aug 26, 2019 at 4:32
  • 2
    The critical piece here is that when thread safety is implemented properly, you'll get an ObjectDisposedException, which you can catch and handle, rather than a non-deterministic exception that could result from using a non-thread-safe version while it's being disposed. It's a shame the BCL implementations don't implement thread safety for dispose.
    – Triynko
    Aug 26, 2019 at 4:36
4

I prefer to use integers and Interlocked.Exchange or Interlocked.CompareExchange on an integer-type object "disposed" or "state" variable; I'd use enum if Interlocked.Exchange or Interlocked.CompareExchange could handle such types, but alas they cannot.

One point which most discussions of IDisposable and finalizers fail to mention is that while an object's finalizer shouldn't run while IDisposable.Dispose() is in progress, there's no way for a class to prevent objects of its type from being declared dead and then resurrected. To be sure, if outside code allows that to happen there obviously can't be any requirement that the object "work normally", but the Dispose and finalize methods should be well-enough protected to ensure that they won't corrupt any other objects' state, which will in turn generally require using either locks or Interlocked operations on object state variables.

2

You have to lock every access to the ressource you are going to dispose. I also added the Dispose pattern I normally use.

public class MyThreadSafeClass : IDisposable
{
    private readonly object lockObj = new object();
    private MyRessource myRessource = new MyRessource();

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        Data data;
        lock (lockObj)
        {
            if (myResource == null) throw new ObjectDisposedException("");
            data = myResource.GetData();
        }
        // Do something with data
    }

    public void DoSomethingElse(Data data)
    {
        // Do something with data
        lock (lockObj)
        {
            if (myRessource == null) throw new ObjectDisposedException("");
            myRessource.SetData(data);
        }
    }

    ~MyThreadSafeClass()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }
    public void Dispose() 
    { 
        Dispose(true); 
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }
    protected void Dispose(bool disposing) 
    {
        if (disposing)
        {
            lock (lockObj)
            {
                if (myRessource != null)
                {
                    myRessource.Dispose();
                    myRessource = null;
                }
            }
            //managed ressources
        }
        // unmanaged ressources
    }
}
2
  • 1
    can you explain why you call GC.SuppressFinalize(this) in the finalizer - isn't it too late for that if the GC is already disposing the instance? Maybe call this after successful dispose to ease the GC? Jan 19, 2012 at 15:09
  • You are right. It was a oversight and should be in the Dispose(). Jan 19, 2012 at 15:35
1

FWIW, your sample code matches how my co-workers and I typically deal with this issue. We generally define a private CheckDisposed method on the class:

private volatile bool isDisposed = false; // Set to true by Dispose

private void CheckDisposed()
{
    if (this.isDisposed)
    {
        throw new ObjectDisposedException("This instance has already been disposed.");
    }
}

Then we call the CheckDisposed() method at the top of all public methods.

If thread contention over disposal is considered likely, rather than an error condition, I will also add a public IsDisposed() method (Similar to Control.IsDisposed).


Update: Based on the comments with respect to the value of making isDisposed volatile, note that the "fence" issue is rather trivial given how I use the CheckDisposed() method. It is essentially a troubleshooting tool for quickly catching the case where code calls a public method on the object after it has already been disposed. Calling CheckDisposed() at the start of a public method in no way guarantees that the object won't be disposed within that method. If I consider that to be a risk inherent in my class's design, as opposed to an error condition I failed to account for, then I use the aforementioned IsDisposed method along with appropriate locking.

7
  • 2
    You also have to ensure that isDisposed is marked as volatile or you're open to a race condition.
    – Dan Rigby
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:02
  • Excellent point. Sample edited to include declaration of isDisposed.
    – dgvid
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:08
  • 3
    @Dan, I don't think a fence is going to help much here, as instruction reordering isn't the issue; the real issue is that Dispose could be called at any point while in the body of the method.
    – Dan Bryant
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:13
  • @Dan B Yes, it's just a piece of the problem. I covered your point in my answer to the question though.
    – Dan Rigby
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:30
  • 1
    @DanRigby: volatile only creates a fence. It doesn't change anything if another thread disposes the object right after the if condition.
    – vgru
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:32

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