94

I'm trying to retrieve the first 5 characters from a string and but keep getting a Bad substitution error for the string manipulation line, I have the following lines in my teststring.sh script:

TESTSTRINGONE="MOTEST"

NEWTESTSTRING=${TESTSTRINGONE:0:5}
echo ${NEWTESTSTRING}

I have went over the syntax many times and cant see what im doing wrong

Thanks

2
  • 1
    Have you had any luck? What version of bash are you using? (bash -version or bash --version, typically)
    – Alex L
    Jan 24, 2012 at 2:41
  • 4
    @Mo. I also would like to encourage you to accept an answer below or at least give some feedback. Alex L's answer is very good imho, and its definitely worth some fake internet points!
    – Overbryd
    Jun 30, 2016 at 8:02

12 Answers 12

81

Depending on your shell, you may be able to use the following syntax:

expr substr $string $position $length

So for your example:

TESTSTRINGONE="MOTEST"
echo `expr substr ${TESTSTRINGONE} 0 5`

Alternatively,

echo 'MOTEST' | cut -c1-5

or

echo 'MOTEST' | awk '{print substr($0,0,5)}'
71

echo 'mystring' |cut -c1-5 is an alternative solution to ur problem.

more on unix cut program

0
65

Works here:

$ TESTSTRINGONE="MOTEST"
$ NEWTESTSTRING=${TESTSTRINGONE:0:5}
$ echo ${NEWTESTSTRING}
MOTES

What shell are you using?

7
  • ok, it works fine in the terminal but it gives the error when i run it from a .sh script
    – Mo.
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:12
  • 6
    Maybe your script is not executed by bash but by some less capable shell.
    – user647772
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:13
  • 4
    Have you tried adding #!/bin/bash or #!/bin/sh to your first line?
    – Alex L
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:17
  • 1
    I bet .sh or #!/bin/sh activate "POSIX compliance mode" of Bash. Since this form of string slicing isn't a POSIX shell feature (it's a Bash feature), that gets lost. Try explicitly setting the top line to #!/bin/bash, not sh.
    – Zac B
    Feb 15, 2017 at 4:27
  • 1
    Which version of Bash are you using? Bash <4 is missing lots of good stuff
    – sibaz
    Oct 10, 2017 at 12:51
15

Substrings with ${variablename:0:5} are a bash feature, not available in basic shells. Are you sure you're running this under bash? Check the shebang line (at the beginning of the script), and make sure it's #!/bin/bash, not #!/bin/sh. And make sure you don't run it with the sh command (i.e. sh scriptname), since that overrides the shebang.

1
  • It was one of the first things I tried, it still gives the same error.
    – Mo.
    Jan 20, 2012 at 10:42
7

This might work for you:

 printf "%.5s" $TESTSTRINGONE
1
  • Is this POSIX? Having trouble groking the printf utility POSIX page May 19, 2019 at 3:25
7

Works in most shells

TESTSTRINGONE="MOTEST"
NEWTESTSTRING=${TESTSTRINGONE%"${TESTSTRINGONE#?????}"}
echo ${NEWTESTSTRING}
# MOTES
1
  • 1
    Until bashisms are accepted by POSIX, +1 for portability (even though the title of this thread specified bash). I like to see these kinds of answers to raise awareness that all the world is not bash.
    – Juan
    May 19, 2016 at 20:44
4
echo $TESTSTRINGONE|awk '{print substr($0,0,5)}'
4

You were so close! Here is the easiest solution: NEWTESTSTRING=$(echo ${TESTSTRINGONE::5})

So for your example:

$ TESTSTRINGONE="MOTEST"
$ NEWTESTSTRING=$(echo ${TESTSTRINGONE::5})
$ echo $NEWTESTSTRING
MOTES
2

You can try sed if you like -

[jaypal:~/Temp] TESTSTRINGONE="MOTEST"
[jaypal:~/Temp] sed 's/\(.\{5\}\).*/\1/' <<< "$TESTSTRINGONE"
MOTES
2
  • I think you mean sed 's/\(.\{5\}\).*/\1/' <<<$TESTSTRINGONE
    – potong
    Jan 19, 2012 at 15:29
  • Yeah, my string was truncated to begin with. Ill update it … Thanks @potong Jan 19, 2012 at 15:30
1

That parameter expansion should work (what version of bash do you have?)

Here's another approach:

read -n 5 NEWTESTSTRING <<< "$TESTSTRINGONE"
1

The original syntax will work with BASH but not with DASH. On debian systems you might think you are using bash, but maybe dash instead. If /bin/dash/exist then try temporarily renaming dash to something like no.dash, and then create soft a link, aka ln -s /bin/bash /bin/dash and see if that fixes the problem.

0

expr substr $string $position $length

$position starts from 1

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