I'd simply like to convert a base-2 binary number string into an int, something like this:

>>> '11111111'.fromBinaryToInt()
255

Is there a way to do this in Python?

  • 2
    While it doesn't really matter, a binary string typically means a string containing actual binary data (a byte contains two hexadecimal digits, ie "\x00" is a null byte). – someone-or-other May 3 '14 at 18:25
up vote 361 down vote accepted

You use the built-in int function, and pass it the base of the input number, i.e. 2 for a binary number:

>>> int('11111111', 2)
255

Here is documentation for python2, and for python3.

  • 33
    In case someone is looking for the opposite: bin(255) -> '0b11111111'. See this answer for additional details. – Akseli Palén Mar 13 '13 at 23:29
  • 5
    It should be noted that this only works for unsigned binary integers. For signed integers, the conversion options are a mess. – Fake Name Nov 1 '14 at 13:30
  • 1
    How to do this in python 3? – Saras Arya Feb 27 '15 at 5:45
  • 2
    @SarasArya It's very similar! :) I updated, see above. – unwind Feb 27 '15 at 8:01
  • 1
    And note that in an interactive REPL session (as suggested by the >>> prompt), you don't need to use print at all. The OP's hypothetical example didn't. So it really should be identical in Python 2 and 3. – John Y Jul 12 '16 at 22:36

Another way to do this is by using the bitstring module:

>>> from bitstring import BitArray
>>> b = BitArray(bin='11111111')
>>> b.uint
255

Note that the unsigned integer is different from the signed integer:

>>> b.int
-1

The bitstring module isn't a requirement, but it has lots of performant methods for turning input into and from bits into other forms, as well as manipulating them.

Just type 0b11111111 in python interactive interface:

>>> 0b11111111
    255

Using int with base is the right way to go. I used to do this before I found int takes base also. It is basically a reduce applied on a list comprehension of the primitive way of converting binary to decimal ( e.g. 110 = 2**0 * 0 + 2 ** 1 * 1 + 2 ** 2 * 1)

add = lambda x,y : x + y
reduce(add, [int(x) * 2 ** y for x, y in zip(list(binstr), range(len(binstr) - 1, -1, -1))])
  • 2
    Instead of defining add = lambda x, y: x + y, int.__add__ can be provided to reduce. E.g. reduce(int.__add__, ...) – Jordan Jambazov Aug 28 '16 at 10:46

If you wanna know what is happening behind the scene, then here you go.

class Binary():
def __init__(self, binNumber):
    self._binNumber = binNumber
    self._binNumber = self._binNumber[::-1]
    self._binNumber = list(self._binNumber)
    self._x = [1]
    self._count = 1
    self._change = 2
    self._amount = 0
    print(self._ToNumber(self._binNumber))
def _ToNumber(self, number):
    self._number = number
    for i in range (1, len (self._number)):
        self._total = self._count * self._change
        self._count = self._total
        self._x.append(self._count)
    self._deep = zip(self._number, self._x)
    for self._k, self._v in self._deep:
        if self._k == '1':
            self._amount += self._v
    return self._amount
mo = Binary('101111110')

A recursive Python implementation:

def int2bin(n):
    return int2bin(n >> 1) + [n & 1] if n > 1 else [1] 

protected by Vamsi Prabhala May 10 at 0:07

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