I've created a filter to in my java webserver (appengine actually) that logs the parameters of an incoming request. I'd also like to log the resulting response that my webserver writes. Although I have access to the response object, I'm not sure how to get the actual string/content response out of it.

Any ideas?

  • How are you writing your response? response.getWriter().write(yourResponseString)??? Or are you doing something different? Are you wanting to write errors as well? (In other words, do you want to log the response when you're doing response.sendError(yourError)??) – Dave Jan 19 '12 at 21:19
  • 1
  • @Dave just using response.getWriter().write(yourResponseString) as you mentioned and thats the old output I'd like to capture. – aloo Jan 20 '12 at 0:58
up vote 83 down vote accepted
+100

You need to create a Filter wherein you wrap the ServletResponse argument with a custom HttpServletResponseWrapper implementation wherein you override the getOutputStream() and getWriter() to return a custom ServletOutputStream implementation wherein you copy the written byte(s) in the base abstract OutputStream#write(int b) method. Then, you pass the wrapped custom HttpServletResponseWrapper to the FilterChain#doFilter() call instead and finally you should be able to get the copied response after the the call.

In other words, the Filter:

@WebFilter("/*")
public class ResponseLogger implements Filter {

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig config) throws ServletException {
        // NOOP.
    }

    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response, FilterChain chain) throws ServletException, IOException {
        if (response.getCharacterEncoding() == null) {
            response.setCharacterEncoding("UTF-8"); // Or whatever default. UTF-8 is good for World Domination.
        }

        HttpServletResponseCopier responseCopier = new HttpServletResponseCopier((HttpServletResponse) response);

        try {
            chain.doFilter(request, responseCopier);
            responseCopier.flushBuffer();
        } finally {
            byte[] copy = responseCopier.getCopy();
            System.out.println(new String(copy, response.getCharacterEncoding())); // Do your logging job here. This is just a basic example.
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void destroy() {
        // NOOP.
    }

}

The custom HttpServletResponseWrapper:

public class HttpServletResponseCopier extends HttpServletResponseWrapper {

    private ServletOutputStream outputStream;
    private PrintWriter writer;
    private ServletOutputStreamCopier copier;

    public HttpServletResponseCopier(HttpServletResponse response) throws IOException {
        super(response);
    }

    @Override
    public ServletOutputStream getOutputStream() throws IOException {
        if (writer != null) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("getWriter() has already been called on this response.");
        }

        if (outputStream == null) {
            outputStream = getResponse().getOutputStream();
            copier = new ServletOutputStreamCopier(outputStream);
        }

        return copier;
    }

    @Override
    public PrintWriter getWriter() throws IOException {
        if (outputStream != null) {
            throw new IllegalStateException("getOutputStream() has already been called on this response.");
        }

        if (writer == null) {
            copier = new ServletOutputStreamCopier(getResponse().getOutputStream());
            writer = new PrintWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(copier, getResponse().getCharacterEncoding()), true);
        }

        return writer;
    }

    @Override
    public void flushBuffer() throws IOException {
        if (writer != null) {
            writer.flush();
        } else if (outputStream != null) {
            copier.flush();
        }
    }

    public byte[] getCopy() {
        if (copier != null) {
            return copier.getCopy();
        } else {
            return new byte[0];
        }
    }

}

The custom ServletOutputStream:

public class ServletOutputStreamCopier extends ServletOutputStream {

    private OutputStream outputStream;
    private ByteArrayOutputStream copy;

    public ServletOutputStreamCopier(OutputStream outputStream) {
        this.outputStream = outputStream;
        this.copy = new ByteArrayOutputStream(1024);
    }

    @Override
    public void write(int b) throws IOException {
        outputStream.write(b);
        copy.write(b);
    }

    public byte[] getCopy() {
        return copy.toByteArray();
    }

}
  • 3
    wondering why is it so complex to get the body of response. It should be something like response.getContent(). Must be some solid reasons behind it :) – antnewbee Feb 6 '13 at 16:01
  • 1
    @ant: It's memory hogging and usually not of interest for the webapp itself. – BalusC Feb 6 '13 at 16:02
  • 1
    @ant: just set a request attribute. – BalusC Feb 6 '13 at 18:36
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    If you understand nothing of it, or can't even tell what part exactly is unclear, then the problem can't be solved by adding comments. The class/method names alone are already self-describing. Better take a step back and learn some basic Java, then HTTP, then servlets. – BalusC Sep 16 '15 at 8:45
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    In case of Spring, starting at version 4.1.3, there's also ContentCachingResponseWrapper. – Benny Bottema Sep 5 '16 at 8:18

BalusC solution is ok, but little outdated. Spring now has feature for it . All you need to do is use [ContentCachingResponseWrapper], which has method public byte[] getContentAsByteArray() .

I Suggest to make WrapperFactory which will allow to make it configurable, whether to use default ResponseWrapper or ContentCachingResponseWrapper.

  • How do you "use" it? From playing around a little with it, it looks like you replace the HttpServletResponseCopier with ContentCachingResponseWrapper -- is that correct? – Nic Hartley Oct 2 at 23:52

I am not quite familiar with appengine but you need something Access Log Valve in Tomcat. Its attribute pattern ; a formatting layout identifying the various information fields from the request and response to be logged, or the word common or combined to select a standard format.

It looks appengine has built in functionality for log filtering.

apply a servlet filter

While BalusC's answer will work in most scenarios you have to be careful with the flush call - it commits response and no other writing to it is possible, eg. via following filters. We have found some problems with very simmilar approach in Websphere environment where the delivered response was only partial.

According to this question the flush should not be called at all and you should let it be called internally.

I have solved the flush problem by using TeeWriter (it splits stream into 2 streams) and using non-buffering streams in the "branched stream" for logging purpose. It is unneccessary to call the flush then.

private HttpServletResponse wrapResponseForLogging(HttpServletResponse response, final Writer branchedWriter) {
    return new HttpServletResponseWrapper(response) {
        PrintWriter writer;

        @Override
        public synchronized PrintWriter getWriter() throws IOException {
            if (writer == null) {
                writer = new PrintWriter(new TeeWriter(super.getWriter(), branchedWriter));
            }
            return writer;
        }
    };
}

Then you can use it this way:

protected void doFilter(ServletRequest request, ServletResponse response, FilterChain chain) throws IOException {
    //...
    StringBuilderWriter branchedWriter = new org.apache.commons.io.output.StringBuilderWriter();
    try {
        chain.doFilter(request, wrapResponseForLogging(response, branchedWriter));
    } finally {
        log.trace("Response: " + branchedWriter);
    }
}

The code is simplified for brewity.

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