129

I need to check whether justPrices[i].substr(commapos+2,1).

The string is something like: "blabla,120"

In this case it would check whether '0' is a number. How can this be done?

3

25 Answers 25

87

You could use comparison operators to see if it is in the range of digit characters:

var c = justPrices[i].substr(commapos+2,1);
if (c >= '0' && c <= '9') {
    // it is a number
} else {
    // it isn't
}
0
62

you can either use parseInt and than check with isNaN

or if you want to work directly on your string you can use regexp like this:

function is_numeric(str){
    return /^\d+$/.test(str);
}
2
  • 6
    Or even simpler if we only need to check a single character: function is_numeric_char(c) { return /\d/.test(c); }
    – jackocnr
    Apr 1 '17 at 15:41
  • 3
    @jackocnr your test will also return true for strings that contains more than just a char (e.g. is_numeric_char("foo1bar") == true). if you want to check for a numeric char /^\d$/.test(c) would be a better solution. but anyway, it wasn't the question :)
    – Yaron U.
    Apr 4 '17 at 16:12
32

EDIT: Blender's updated answer is the right answer here if you're just checking a single character (namely !isNaN(parseInt(c, 10))). My answer below is a good solution if you want to test whole strings.

Here is jQuery's isNumeric implementation (in pure JavaScript), which works against full strings:

function isNumeric(s) {
    return !isNaN(s - parseFloat(s));
}

The comment for this function reads:

// parseFloat NaNs numeric-cast false positives (null|true|false|"")
// ...but misinterprets leading-number strings, particularly hex literals ("0x...")
// subtraction forces infinities to NaN

I think we can trust that these chaps have spent quite a bit of time on this!

Commented source here. Super geek discussion here.

1
  • 2
    This works, but it is an overkill for digit-only check (it works with multi-digit numbers). My solution may not be as clear, but is much faster than this. Jul 19 '14 at 16:36
24

I wonder why nobody has posted a solution like:

var charCodeZero = "0".charCodeAt(0);
var charCodeNine = "9".charCodeAt(0);

function isDigitCode(n) {
   return(n >= charCodeZero && n <= charCodeNine);
}

with an invocation like:

if (isDigitCode(justPrices[i].charCodeAt(commapos+2))) {
    ... // digit
} else {
    ... // not a digit
}
2
  • searched exactly for that kind of solution - ty Feb 28 '17 at 8:06
  • You can drop the 0 parameter value for charCodeAt since 0 is implied when the parameter is not provided. Mar 12 '20 at 11:00
22

Simple function

function isCharNumber(c) {
  return c >= '0' && c <= '9';
}
17

You can use this:

function isDigit(n) {
    return Boolean([true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true, true][n]);
}

Here, I compared it to the accepted method: http://jsperf.com/isdigittest/5 . I didn't expect much, so I was pretty suprised, when I found out that accepted method was much slower.

Interesting thing is, that while accepted method is faster correct input (eg. '5') and slower for incorrect (eg. 'a'), my method is exact opposite (fast for incorrect and slower for correct).

Still, in worst case, my method is 2 times faster than accepted solution for correct input and over 5 times faster for incorrect input.

3
  • 5
    I love this answer! Maybe optimize it to: !!([!0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0][n]); It has great WTF potential and works quite well (fails for 007).
    – Jonathan
    Sep 15 '15 at 19:20
  • @Jonathan - see my answer, method #4
    – vsync
    Mar 30 '16 at 11:26
  • 9
    According to this 'solution', "length" (and other attributes found on arrays) are digits :P
    – Shadow
    Dec 14 '17 at 4:50
13

I think it's very fun to come up with ways to solve this. Below are some.
(All functions below assume argument is a single character. Change to n[0] to enforce it)

Method 1:

function isCharDigit(n){
  return !!n.trim() && n > -1;
}

Method 2:

function isCharDigit(n){
  return !!n.trim() && n*0==0;
}

Method 3:

function isCharDigit(n){
  return !!n.trim() && !!Number(n+.1); // "+.1' to make it work with "." and "0" Chars
}

Method 4:

var isCharDigit = (function(){
  var a = [1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1];
  return function(n){
    return !!a[n] // check if `a` Array has anything in index 'n'. Cast result to boolean
  }
})();

Method 5:

function isCharDigit(n){
  return !!n.trim() && !isNaN(+n);
}

Test string:

var str = ' 90ABcd#?:.+', char;
for( char of str ) 
  console.log( char, isCharDigit(char) );
3
  • Methods 1, 2, 3 and 5 output true for " ".
    – user247702
    Mar 30 '16 at 8:38
  • For fun I did a jsperf of these, then added a charCodeAt() comparison - which was almost 4x faster - jsperf.com/isdigit3
    – Rycochet
    Nov 1 '16 at 10:11
  • @Rycochet - good one. ASCII codes range really is the best way to test..
    – vsync
    Nov 1 '16 at 11:38
7

The shortest solution is:

const isCharDigit = n => n < 10;

You can apply these as well:

const isCharDigit = n => Boolean(++n);

const isCharDigit = n => '/' < n && n < ':';

const isCharDigit = n => !!++n;

if you want to check more than 1 chatacter, you might use next variants

Regular Expression:

const isDigit = n => /\d+/.test(n);

Comparison:

const isDigit = n => +n == n;

Check if it is not NaN

const isDigit = n => !isNaN(n);
2
  • First one seems to be wrong, n<10 will return true for the space character, for example.
    – Michael
    Dec 29 '20 at 21:20
  • Boolean(++n) also returns true for the space character.
    – Michael
    Dec 29 '20 at 21:21
6

I suggest a simple regex.

If you're looking for just the last character in the string:

/^.*?[0-9]$/.test("blabla,120");  // true
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test("blabla,120a"); // false
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test("120");         // true
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test(120);           // true
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test(undefined);     // false
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test(-1);            // true
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test("-1");          // true
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test(false);         // false
/^.*?[0-9]$/.test(true);          // false

And the regex is even simpler if you are just checking a single char as an input:

var char = "0";
/^[0-9]$/.test(char);             // true
5

If you are testing single characters, then:

var isDigit = (function() {
    var re = /^\d$/;
    return function(c) {
        return re.test(c);
    }
}());

will return true or false depending on whether c is a digit or not.

3
var Is = {
    character: {
        number: (function() {
            // Only computed once
            var zero = "0".charCodeAt(0), nine = "9".charCodeAt(0);

            return function(c) {
                return (c = c.charCodeAt(0)) >= zero && c <= nine;
            }
        })()
    }
};
1
isNumber = function(obj, strict) {
    var strict = strict === true ? true : false;
    if (strict) {
        return !isNaN(obj) && obj instanceof Number ? true : false;
    } else {
        return !isNaN(obj - parseFloat(obj));
    }
}

output without strict mode:

var num = 14;
var textnum = '14';
var text = 'yo';
var nan = NaN;

isNumber(num);
isNumber(textnum);
isNumber(text);
isNumber(nan);

true
true
false
false

output with strict mode:

var num = 14;
var textnum = '14';
var text = 'yo';
var nan = NaN;

isNumber(num, true);
isNumber(textnum, true);
isNumber(text, true);
isNumber(nan);

true
false
false
false
1

Try:

function is_numeric(str){
        try {
           return isFinite(str)
        }
        catch(err) {
            return false
        }
    }
1

Similar to one of the answers above, I used

 var sum = 0; //some value
 let num = parseInt(val); //or just Number.parseInt
 if(!isNaN(num)) {
     sum += num;
 }

This blogpost sheds some more light on this check if a string is numeric in Javascript | Typescript & ES6

1

A simple solution by leveraging language's dynamic type checking:

function isNumber (string) {
   //it has whitespace
   if(string.trim() === ''){
     return false
   }
   return string - 0 === string * 1
}

see test cases below

function isNumber (str) {
   if(str.trim() === ''){
     return false
   }
   return str - 0 === str * 1
}


console.log('-1' + ' → ' + isNumber ('-1'))    
console.log('-1.5' + ' → ' + isNumber ('-1.5')) 
console.log('0' + ' → ' + isNumber ('0'))    
console.log(', ,' + ' → ' + isNumber (', ,'))  
console.log('0.42' + ' → ' + isNumber ('0.42'))   
console.log('.42' + ' → ' + isNumber ('.42'))    
console.log('#abcdef' + ' → ' + isNumber ('#abcdef'))
console.log('1.2.3' + ' → ' + isNumber ('1.2.3')) 
console.log('' + ' → ' + isNumber (''))    
console.log('blah' + ' → ' + isNumber ('blah'))

1

Use combination of isNaN and parseInt functions:

var character = ... ; // your character
var isDigit = ! isNaN( parseInt(character) );

Another notable way - multiplication by one (like character * 1 instead of parseInt(character)) - makes a number not only from any numeric string, but also a 0 from empty string and a string containing only spaces so it is not suitable here.

0

This seems to work:

Static binding:

String.isNumeric = function (value) {
    return !isNaN(String(value) * 1);
};

Prototype binding:

String.prototype.isNumeric = function () {
    return !isNaN(this.valueOf() * 1);
};

It will check single characters, as well as whole strings to see if they are numeric.

0
square = function(a) {
    if ((a * 0) == 0) {
        return a*a;
    } else {
        return "Enter a valid number.";
    }
}

Source

0
function is_numeric(mixed_var) {
    return (typeof(mixed_var) === 'number' || typeof(mixed_var) === 'string') &&
        mixed_var !== '' && !isNaN(mixed_var);
}

Source code

0

You can try this (worked in my case)

If you want to test if the first char of a string is an int:

if (parseInt(YOUR_STRING.slice(0, 1))) {
    alert("first char is int")
} else {
    alert("first char is not int")
}

If you want to test if the char is a int:

if (parseInt(YOUR_CHAR)) {
    alert("first char is int")
} else {
    alert("first char is not int")
}
0
0

This function works for all test cases that i could find. It's also faster than:

function isNumeric (n) {
  if (!isNaN(parseFloat(n)) && isFinite(n) && !hasLeading0s(n)) {
    return true;
  }
  var _n = +n;
  return _n === Infinity || _n === -Infinity;
}

var isIntegerTest = /^\d+$/;
var isDigitArray = [!0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0, !0];

function hasLeading0s(s) {
  return !(typeof s !== 'string' ||
    s.length < 2 ||
    s[0] !== '0' ||
    !isDigitArray[s[1]] ||
    isIntegerTest.test(s));
}
var isWhiteSpaceTest = /\s/;

function fIsNaN(n) {
  return !(n <= 0) && !(n > 0);
}

function isNumber(s) {
  var t = typeof s;
  if (t === 'number') {
    return (s <= 0) || (s > 0);
  } else if (t === 'string') {
    var n = +s;
    return !(fIsNaN(n) || hasLeading0s(s) || !(n !== 0 || !(s === '' || isWhiteSpaceTest.test(s))));
  } else if (t === 'object') {
    return !(!(s instanceof Number) || fIsNaN(+s));
  }
  return false;
}

function testRunner(IsNumeric) {
  var total = 0;
  var passed = 0;
  var failedTests = [];

  function test(value, result) {
    total++;
    if (IsNumeric(value) === result) {
      passed++;
    } else {
      failedTests.push({
        value: value,
        expected: result
      });
    }
  }
  // true
  test(0, true);
  test(1, true);
  test(-1, true);
  test(Infinity, true);
  test('Infinity', true);
  test(-Infinity, true);
  test('-Infinity', true);
  test(1.1, true);
  test(-0.12e-34, true);
  test(8e5, true);
  test('1', true);
  test('0', true);
  test('-1', true);
  test('1.1', true);
  test('11.112', true);
  test('.1', true);
  test('.12e34', true);
  test('-.12e34', true);
  test('.12e-34', true);
  test('-.12e-34', true);
  test('8e5', true);
  test('0x89f', true);
  test('00', true);
  test('01', true);
  test('10', true);
  test('0e1', true);
  test('0e01', true);
  test('.0', true);
  test('0.', true);
  test('.0e1', true);
  test('0.e1', true);
  test('0.e00', true);
  test('0xf', true);
  test('0Xf', true);
  test(Date.now(), true);
  test(new Number(0), true);
  test(new Number(1e3), true);
  test(new Number(0.1234), true);
  test(new Number(Infinity), true);
  test(new Number(-Infinity), true);
  // false
  test('', false);
  test(' ', false);
  test(false, false);
  test('false', false);
  test(true, false);
  test('true', false);
  test('99,999', false);
  test('#abcdef', false);
  test('1.2.3', false);
  test('blah', false);
  test('\t\t', false);
  test('\n\r', false);
  test('\r', false);
  test(NaN, false);
  test('NaN', false);
  test(null, false);
  test('null', false);
  test(new Date(), false);
  test({}, false);
  test([], false);
  test(new Int8Array(), false);
  test(new Uint8Array(), false);
  test(new Uint8ClampedArray(), false);
  test(new Int16Array(), false);
  test(new Uint16Array(), false);
  test(new Int32Array(), false);
  test(new Uint32Array(), false);
  test(new BigInt64Array(), false);
  test(new BigUint64Array(), false);
  test(new Float32Array(), false);
  test(new Float64Array(), false);
  test('.e0', false);
  test('.', false);
  test('00e1', false);
  test('01e1', false);
  test('00.0', false);
  test('01.05', false);
  test('00x0', false);
  test(new Number(NaN), false);
  test(new Number('abc'), false);
  console.log('Passed ' + passed + ' of ' + total + ' tests.');
  if (failedTests.length > 0) console.log({
    failedTests: failedTests
  });
}
testRunner(isNumber)

1
  • I fixed the '0' case.
    – c7x43t
    Aug 9 '19 at 21:30
0

Here is a simple function that does it.

function is_number(char) {{
    return !isNaN(parseInt(char));
}}

Returns:  true, false

Happy coding!

0

I am using this:

const isNumber = (str) => (
    str.length === str.trim().length 
    && str.length > 0
    && Number(str) >= 0
)

It works for strings or single characters.

0

modifying this answer to be little more convenient and limiting to chars(and not string):

const charCodeZero = "0".charCodeAt(0);
const charCodeNine = "9".charCodeAt(0);
function isDigit(s:string) {
    return s.length==1&& s.charCodeAt(0) >= charCodeZero && s.charCodeAt(0) <= charCodeNine;
}

console.log(isDigit('4'))   //true
console.log(isDigit('4s'))  //false
console.log(isDigit('s'))   //false

-1

Just use isFinite

const number = "1";
if (isFinite(number)) {
    // do something
}
1
  • This returns true for a space " " Nov 27 '17 at 22:26

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