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I see in bash scripts two different forms which seems to do the same:

`some command`

and

$(some command)

What is the difference between the two, and when should I use each one of them?

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There is no semantic difference. The backtick syntax is the older and less powerful version. See man bash, Section "Command Substitution".

If your shell supports the $() syntax, prefer it because it can be nested.

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    I see that backticks can also be nested. For example: `echo \`foo\`` – Misha Moroshko Jan 20 '12 at 22:03
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    @MishaMoroshko: Expressions like `echo `foo`` (as opposed to $(echo $(foo))) won't work in general because of the inherent ambiguity because each `` can be opening or closing. It might work for special cases due to luck or special features. – thiton Jan 20 '12 at 22:06
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    There is a semantic difference: backtick syntax handles backslashes in a different and non-obvious manner. See: mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/082 – benkc Nov 11 '16 at 20:04
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    I am using a makefile. In that makefile I have the following command gcc pkg-config --cflags gtk+-3.0 -o $@ $< pkg-config --libs gtk+-3.0 If I replace the backticks to the bash function call: gcc $(pkg-config --cflags gtk+-3.0) -o $@ $< $(pkg-config --libs gtk+-3.0) the makefile fails So, via the make utility, there is a difference. The command line execution does not fail. – Leslie Satenstein Aug 20 '17 at 18:15
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    Another difference is: echo foo `#comment` vs echo foo $(#comment). The second one doesn't work. (Used for commenting in a multi-line command.) – wisbucky Jul 10 '19 at 22:04

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