Can PowerShell 1.0 create hard and soft links analogous to the Unix variety?

If this isn't built in, can someone point me to a site that has a ps1 script that mimics this?

This is a necessary function of any good shell, IMHO. :)

  • 2
    Windows 10 users see stackoverflow.com/a/34905638/195755 . Windows 10 it is built-in. Copy/Paste: New-Item -Type and press tab to cycle through the options. Hardlink, SymbolicLink, and Junction appear for me. Works Win 10, Server 2016+, or older OS with Powershell 5.0+ installed via Windows Management Framework 5.0+. – yzorg Sep 28 '16 at 21:01
  • 1
    I can't find decent MSDN/TechNet documentation for New-Item -Type HardLink nor New-Item -Type SymbolicLink. New-Item docs link to help about_Providers, it suggests you read help for each provider (which isn't linked). But if you google it there is plenty of buzz in the PowerShell community around New-Item -Type HardLink. It looks like the PowerShell engineering team has come up with provider extension points that stump the docs team. – yzorg Sep 28 '16 at 21:06

11 Answers 11

up vote 205 down vote accepted

You can call the mklink provided by cmd, from PowerShell to make symbolic links:

cmd /c mklink c:\path\to\symlink c:\target\file

You must pass /d to mklink if the target is a directory.

For hard links, I suggest something like Sysinternals Junction.

  • 26
    If you have a powershell profile, you can also make a quick function function mklink { cmd /c mklink $args } – Joe Young Nov 6 '11 at 2:19
  • 14
    and if you want to make a directory link, the command will be something like { cmd /c mklink /D "toDir" fromDir } – DavidDraughn Mar 28 '12 at 15:38
  • 9
    adding the /H parameter to mklink will create a hard link without the need for a third party program like Sysinternals Junction. – Fopedush Dec 19 '12 at 1:40
  • 3
    I think jocassid has the better answer. IMHO, We should try to teach how to USE PowerShell, not use exploits and hacks through cmd.exe. – Cameron Oakenleaf Sep 23 '17 at 5:10
  • @CameronOakenleaf I agree whole-heartedly. – Jason R. Coombs Sep 24 '17 at 14:54

Windows 10 (and Powershell 5.0 in general) allows you to create symbolic links via the New-Item cmdlet.

Usage:

New-Item -Path C:\LinkDir -ItemType SymbolicLink -Value F:\RealDir

Or in your profile:

function make-link ($target, $link) {
    New-Item -Path $link -ItemType SymbolicLink -Value $target
}

Turn on Developer Mode to not require admin privileges when making links with New-Item:

enter image description here

  • 2
    This link is now broken due to MS rearranging documentation. I found a current working link at technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh849795.aspx – Aaron Thomas Jul 19 '16 at 15:55
  • 3
    New-Item -Path C:\LinkDir -ItemType SymbolicLink -Value F:\RealDir – Daniel Fisher lennybacon Aug 16 '16 at 8:43
  • 4
    since Windows v1703, mklink allows creating symlinks without account elevation, if Developer mode is enabled in Settings, New-Item doesn't. Hopefully in next update. – papo Jun 29 '17 at 1:46
  • Fascinating. So this is quite distinct from an Explorer .lnk shortcut. In explorer, a shortcut and symlink of the same name display side by side as if nothing was amiss. Their behaviors are subtly different; following the symlink shows the absolute path in the Explorer bar. Following the shortcut treats it as if the symlink parent dir is the true parent. – BaseZen Oct 18 at 16:03

No, it isn't built into PowerShell and the utility mklink on Windows Vista/Windows 7 is built directly into cmd.exe. You can use the PowerShell Community Extensions (free). There are several cmdlets for reparse points of various types:

  • New-HardLink,
  • New-SymLink,
  • New-Junction,
  • Remove-ReparsePoint
  • and others.
  • 1
    Good try. Though if you want to run XP or W2K3 server in either x32 or x64, New-Symlink dosen't work. In XP it will politely tell you that you should be running Vista for this command. In W2K3 server, it flat out breaks. – Mike T May 21 '09 at 19:55
  • That's because XP doesn't support symlinks. That's a feature new to Vista. I believe that W2K3 server doesn't support symlinks either. You have to step up to W2K8 server to get symlink support. I'll look into why new-symlink is bombing on W2k3, it should error with a similar message to XP. – Keith Hill May 21 '09 at 21:09
  • I tried new-junction and that will work for me. Too bad the link functionality doesn't degrade to junctions in XP and W2K3 – Mike T May 21 '09 at 22:06
  • on further use of new-junction... I get a junction to the new parse point. However ls (or get-childitem) errors stating that.."The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect" If I try and enter a subdirectory from there. – Mike T May 21 '09 at 23:24
  • 1
    Windows 10 users see answer stackoverflow.com/a/34905638/195755 . Windows 10 it is built-in. Copy/Paste: New-Item -Type and press tab to cycle through the options. Hardlink, SymbolicLink, and Junction appear for me. Works Win 10, Server 2016+, or older OS with Powershell 5.0 installed via Windows Management Framework 5.0+. – yzorg Sep 28 '16 at 20:57

In Windows 7, the command is

fsutil hardlink create new-file existing-file

PowerShell finds it without the full path (c:\Windows\system32) or extension (.exe).

  • worked like a charm – UncleZeiv Apr 8 '13 at 23:50
  • 1
    fsutil hardlink requires new-file and existing-file to be on the same drive. If that matters to you, use cmd's mklink /c instead. – mopsled Jan 29 '15 at 19:54
  • 8
    @mopsled Hardlinks, by definition, must be on the same volume as the target, this is not a limitation specific to fsutil (or Windows for that matter) – Dev Feb 23 '15 at 15:35
  • is there an equivalent for "soft" symlinks and junctions? – jshall Dec 8 '15 at 1:40

New-Symlink:

Function New-SymLink ($link, $target)
{
    if (test-path -pathtype container $target)
    {
        $command = "cmd /c mklink /d"
    }
    else
    {
        $command = "cmd /c mklink"
    }

    invoke-expression "$command $link $target"
}

Remove-Symlink:

Function Remove-SymLink ($link)
{
    if (test-path -pathtype container $link)
    {
        $command = "cmd /c rmdir"
    }
    else
    {
        $command = "cmd /c del"
    }

    invoke-expression "$command $link"
}

Usage:

New-Symlink "c:\foo\bar" "c:\foo\baz"
Remove-Symlink "c:\foo\bar"
  • 2
    Windows 10 users see stackoverflow.com/a/34905638/195755 . Windows 10 it is built-in. Copy/Paste: New-Item -Type and press tab to cycle through the options. Hardlink, SymbolicLink, and Junction appear for me. Works Win 10, Server 2016+, or older OS with Powershell 5.0 installed via Windows Management Framework 5.0+. – yzorg Sep 28 '16 at 20:52
  • Doesn't work if the folder contain spaces. – mhenry1384 Apr 4 '17 at 15:59
  • Or if the file name contains them. – Chris Charabaruk Sep 30 '17 at 2:32

The Junction command line utility from Sysinternals makes creating and deleting symbolic (soft)links easy. Hard Links and Junctions in Windows.

  • The use of this utility correctly allows me to junction another directory and traverse it's subdirectories successfully. All in XP and W2K3. Just add the exe to a directory in your PATH and call it like normal. – Mike T May 21 '09 at 23:31
  • I don't think you can use junction.exe to create symbolic links. – Jason R. Coombs Apr 5 '11 at 9:04
  • 3
    It´s better to use mklink which is shipped with Windows. If you have a Windows version which it is shipped with. – Deleted Jul 30 '12 at 17:07

You can use this utility:

c:\Windows\system32\fsutil.exe create hardlink
  • 1
    It will require elevated privileges, though. Creating hardlinks usually doesn't. – Joey May 21 '09 at 23:43

I wrote a PowerShell module that has native wrappers for MKLINK. https://gist.github.com/2891103

Includes functions for:

  • New-Symlink
  • New-HardLink
  • New-Junction

Captures the MKLINK output and throws proper PowerShell errors when necessary.

I combined two answers (@bviktor and @jocassid). It was tested on Windows 10 and Windows Server 2012.

function New-SymLink ($link, $target)
{
    if ($PSVersionTable.PSVersion.Major -ge 5)
    {
        New-Item -Path $link -ItemType SymbolicLink -Value $target
    }
    else
    {
        $command = "cmd /c mklink /d"
        invoke-expression "$command ""$link"" ""$target"""
    }
}

Actually, the Sysinternals junction command only works with directories (don't ask me why), so it can't hardlink files. I would go with cmd /c mklink for soft links (I can't figure why it's not supported directly by PowerShell), or fsutil for hardlinks.

If you need it to work on Windows XP, I do not know of anything other than Sysinternals junction, so you might be limited to directories.

I found this the simple way without external help. Yes, it uses an archaic DOS command but it works, it's easy, and it's clear.

$target = cmd /c dir /a:l | ? { $_ -match "mySymLink \[.*\]$" } | % `
{
    $_.Split([char[]] @( '[', ']' ), [StringSplitOptions]::RemoveEmptyEntries)[1]
}

This uses the DOS dir command to find all entries with the symbolic link attribute, filters on the specific link name followed by target "[]" brackets, and for each - presumably one - extracts just the target string.

  • 3
    Is this an answer for a different question? – Allanrbo Jul 7 '15 at 14:01

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.