I have a survey on a website, and there seems to be some issues with the users hitting enter (I don't know why) and accidentally submitting the survey (form) without clicking the submit button. Is there a way to prevent this?

I'm using HTML, PHP 5.2.9, and jQuery on the survey.

  • 1
    Don't use form tags and do custom ajax request :) But sure, you can go ahead with the key-listening and prevention approach, that's what I'd do.. – jancha Jun 16 '16 at 7:43
  • I just don't use the form tags because I prefer to process forms through ajax requests by non-conventional ways (i.e: submitting some fields as their focus are dropped, etc). You can also make a special listener to catch Enter key and process it only if you want to do it. – Juan Aug 28 '17 at 16:49

27 Answers 27

up vote 741 down vote accepted

You can use a method such as

$(document).ready(function() {
  $(window).keydown(function(event){
    if(event.keyCode == 13) {
      event.preventDefault();
      return false;
    }
  });
});

In reading the comments on the original post, to make it more usable and allow people to press Enter if they have completed all the fields:

function validationFunction() {
  $('input').each(function() {
    ...

  }
  if(good) {
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}

$(document).ready(function() {
  $(window).keydown(function(event){
    if( (event.keyCode == 13) && (validationFunction() == false) ) {
      event.preventDefault();
      return false;
    }
  });
});
  • 7
    I'm currently just looking for a quick fix, and don't have time to implement validation items. I appreciate everyone's answers, but this is the one i'm going to go with in the mean time. thank you. – DForck42 May 22 '09 at 13:42
  • 4
    $(window) didn't work for me. I had to use $(document). – Kevin Pauli Nov 10 '10 at 19:04
  • 6
    This method is unideal because it prevents the user from submitting the form by pressing enter while focused on the submit button. The best solution would be that of BalusC below, where enter is interrupted only while still focused on the form inputs. – Anson Kao Oct 19 '11 at 17:25
  • 3
    I've seen situations (Internet Explorer only) where you need to bind to keydown on the document instead of the window for this to work. – MartinHN Feb 22 '12 at 9:03
  • 1
    You might want to add && !$(document.activeElement).is('textarea') to the condition, or else newlines inside a textarea are blocked (in IE at least). – Flash Aug 8 '12 at 6:47

Disallow enter key anywhere

If you don't have a <textarea> in your form, then just add the following to your <form>:

<form ... onkeypress="return event.keyCode != 13;">

Or with jQuery:

$(document).on("keypress", "form", function(event) { 
    return event.keyCode != 13;
});

This will cause that every key press inside the form will be checked on the keyCode. If it is not 13 (the Enter key), then it will return true and anything will go as expected. If it is 13 (the Enter key), then it will return false and anything will stop immediately, so the form won't be submitted.

The keypress event is preferred over keydown as this is only fired when the character is actually being inserted. The keydown (and keyup) are fired when any key is pressed, including control keys. And, the keyCode of keypress represents the actual character being inserted, not the physical key used. This way you don't need to explicitly check if Numpad Enter key (108) is pressed too. The keyup is too late to block form submit.

Note that $(window) as suggested in some other answers instead of $(document) doesn't work for keydown/keypress/keyup in IE<=8, so that's not a good choice if you're like to cover those poor users as well.

Allow enter key on textareas only

If you have a <textarea> in your form (which of course should accept the Enter key), then add the keypress handler to every individual input element which isn't a <textarea>.

<input ... onkeypress="return event.keyCode != 13;">
<select ... onkeypress="return event.keyCode != 13;">
...

To reduce boilerplate, this is better to be done with jQuery:

$(document).on("keypress", ":input:not(textarea)", function(event) {
    return event.keyCode != 13;
});

If you have other event handler functions attached on those input elements, which you'd also like to invoke on enter key for some reason, then only prevent event's default behavior instead of returning false, so it can properly propagate to other handlers.

$(document).on("keypress", ":input:not(textarea)", function(event) {
    if (event.keyCode == 13) {
        event.preventDefault();
    }
});

Allow enter key on textareas and submit buttons only

If you'd like to allow enter key on submit buttons <input|button type="submit"> too, then you can always refine the selector as below.

$(document).on("keypress", ":input:not(textarea):not([type=submit])", function(event) {
    // ...
});

Note that input[type=text] as suggested in some other answers doesn't cover those HTML5 non-text inputs, so that's not a good selector.

  • 5
    This one should be the good answer since it also deals with form including textarea and better explain event propagation – foobar Apr 13 '16 at 9:45
  • 2
    ":input:not(textarea):not([type=submit]):not(button)" if you are using <button> instead of <input type=submit> – Simon_Weaver Sep 24 '16 at 21:39
  • This prevents enter key from working on any input other than textarea. It's not a good solution – mate.gwozdz Dec 2 '17 at 14:07
  • @BalusC - stackoverflow.com/a/47702569/3049675 – mate.gwozdz Dec 7 '17 at 19:39
  • Is there supposed to be a colon before input? – xfactorial Sep 14 at 22:54

I had to catch all three events related to pressing keys in order to prevent the form from being submitted:

    var preventSubmit = function(event) {
        if(event.keyCode == 13) {
            console.log("caught ya!");
            event.preventDefault();
            //event.stopPropagation();
            return false;
        }
    }
    $("#search").keypress(preventSubmit);
    $("#search").keydown(preventSubmit);
    $("#search").keyup(preventSubmit);

You can combine all the above into a nice compact version:

    $('#search').bind('keypress keydown keyup', function(e){
       if(e.keyCode == 13) { e.preventDefault(); }
    });
  • 6
    You could either chain the last 3 selectors or bind multiple events with one method like so $("#search").bind('keypress keyup keydown',preventSubmit); – Moak Jan 3 '13 at 2:38
  • Because in an ASP.NET web form everything has to be nested in a <form> tag, the enter key will submit the form... This solution disabled the enter key and fixed the problem though, thanks @Dave! Then I enabled the enter key for certain fields by id. – Ian Campbell Aug 9 '13 at 18:23
  • @Upgradingdave How are you able to write "log()" instead of "console.log()"? – radbyx Sep 20 at 5:51
  • 1
    @radbyx ... good catch, it should be console.log, I updated my answer. – Upgradingdave Sep 20 at 14:52

If you use a script to do the actual submit, then you can add "return false" line to the onsubmit handler like this:

<form onsubmit="return false;">

Calling submit() on the form from JavaScript will not trigger the event.

  • doesn't work on Chrome – Stepan Yakovenko Jun 30 '16 at 8:14
  • Works for me in Chrome, this will also disable submit buttons, which is fine if you want to trigger an onlick-event on the submit button itself. Ajax hint: Add your function call before the return and the user can still hit the enter key without submitting the form to the page. – Dennis Heiden Aug 4 '16 at 15:08
  • Worked for me on Chrome, IE-11, and Firefox and was the simplest solution to implement. Disabling the enter key on whole sections of the page, as some answers do, seems too extreme and prone to bugs. – Roberto Apr 23 at 15:49

Use:

$(document).on('keyup keypress', 'form input[type="text"]', function(e) {
  if(e.keyCode == 13) {
    e.preventDefault();
    return false;
  }
});

This solution works on all forms on a website (also on forms inserted with Ajax), preventing only Enters in input texts. Place it in a document ready function, and forget this problem for a life.

Instead of preventing users from pressing Enter, which may seem unnatural, you can leave the form as is and add some extra client-side validation: When the survey is not finished the result is not sent to the server and the user gets a nice message telling what needs to be finished to complete the form. If you are using jQuery, try the Validation plugin:

http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Validation

This will require more work than catching the Enter button, but surely it will provide a richer user experience.

  • 10
    This sounds good but optional fields are problematic, the user may press enter by mistake and the form will be submitted. I do not see how you are going to know when the survey is not finished unless you put every field as required (no default choices, no blank fields allowed...) – Christophe Roussy Jan 30 '13 at 11:00

A nice simple little jQuery solution:

$("form").bind("keypress", function (e) {
    if (e.keyCode == 13) {
        return false;
    }
});
  • 1
    +1 I was looking for a jQuery alternative, instead of using normal JS like var key = event.keyCode || event.which; if (key == 13) return false; – RaphaelDDL Dec 13 '11 at 13:38
  • 1
    technically this is still POJ just with a simpler jquery wrapper. the code that you've given is nearly the same thing. – Eonasdan Dec 13 '11 at 14:03

I can't comment yet, so I'll post a new answer

Accepted answer is ok-ish, but it wasn't stopping submit on numpad enter. At least in current version of Chrome. I had to alter the keycode condition to this, then it works.

if(event.keyCode == 13 || event.keyCode == 169) {...}
  • 5
    The difference between Enter and Return - many Point-Of-Sales operators use the numpad exclusively. +1 – helloserve Feb 25 '15 at 5:58
  • 6
    Now (05-21-2015), for both normal enter and numpad enter, keyCode is 13 [Chrome 42, IE 11, FIreFox 36] – Cliff Burton May 21 '15 at 14:55

It is my solution to reach the goal, it is clean and effective.

$('form').submit(function () {
  if ($(document.activeElement).attr('type') == 'submit')
     return true;
  else return false;
});

A completely different approach:

  1. The first <button type="submit"> in the form will be activated on pressing Enter.
  2. This is true even if the button is hidden with style="display:none;
  3. The script for that button can return false, which aborts the submission process.
  4. You can still have another <button type=submit> to submit the form. Just return true to cascade the submission.
  5. Pressing Enter while the real submit button is focussed will activate the real submit button.
  6. Pressing Enter inside <textarea> or other form controls will behave as normal.
  7. Pressing Enter inside <input> form controls will trigger the first <button type=submit>, which returns false, and thus nothing happens.

Thus:

<form action="...">
  <!-- insert this next line immediately after the <form> opening tag -->
  <button type=submit onclick="return false;" style="display:none;"></button>

  <!-- everything else follows as normal -->
  <!-- ... -->
  <button type=submit>Submit</button>
</form>
  • 1
    Hmm, in Chrome and Firefox, an even shorter version would be <button disabled style="display:none;"><button>, which also has the virtue of not requiring JS to work. Safari simply ignores the button and so other stuff will happen as normal. – Erics Feb 27 '17 at 5:12
  • 1
    I really don't liked the "ignoring 13 keycode" way, so i started to thinking for some easy and tricky way, and this idea came to my mind and as i was scrolling down this page i saw this thread :). Plus one for mutual idea and of-course the best solution. – Jalali Shakib May 10 at 5:42
  • Perfect answer for me. I wanted a form to emulate a CLI so the user would press enter for each next field and then have a submit at the end. – nathan Jul 8 at 20:22

Section 4.10.22.2 Implicit submission of the W3C HTML5 spec says:

A form element's default button is the first submit button in tree order whose form owner is that form element.

If the user agent supports letting the user submit a form implicitly (for example, on some platforms hitting the "enter" key while a text field is focused implicitly submits the form), then doing so for a form whose default button has a defined activation behavior must cause the user agent to run synthetic click activation steps on that default button.

Note: Consequently, if the default button is disabled, the form is not submitted when such an implicit submission mechanism is used. (A button has no activation behavior when disabled.)

Therefore, a standards-compliant way to disable any implicit submission of the form is to place a disabled submit button as the first submit button in the form:

<form action="...">
  <!-- Prevent implicit submission of the form -->
  <button type="submit" disabled style="display: none" aria-hidden="true"></button>

  <!-- ... -->

  <button type="submit">Submit</button>
</form>

One nice feature of this approach is that it works without JavaScript; whether or not JavaScript is enabled, a standards-conforming web browser is required to prevent implicit form submission.

  • Errrr... This is solid gold. If this really works cross browser, it deserves to go to the top! How can so many people have answered with variations of keypress, keydown etc but missed this standards based answer? – John Rees Jul 27 at 10:27
  • On one hand it's simple and prevents all the pitfalls suggested by the accepted answers. On the other hand, it feels like a slight exploitation of the standard. Kudos for including aria-* attribute. I would love to hear more feedback on this. – NathanCH Oct 2 at 20:09

Giving the form an action of 'javascript:void(0);' seems to do the trick

<form action="javascript:void(0);">
<input type="text" />
</form>
<script>
$(document).ready(function() {
    $(window).keydown(function(event){
        if(event.keyCode == 13) {
    alert('Hello');
        }
    });
});
</script>

I needed to prevent only specific inputs from submitting, so I used a class selector, to let this be a "global" feature wherever I need it.

<input id="txtEmail" name="txtEmail" class="idNoEnter" .... />

And this jQuery code:

$('.idNoEnter').keydown(function (e) {
  if (e.keyCode == 13) {
    e.preventDefault();
  }
});

Alternatively, if keydown is insufficient:

$('.idNoEnter').on('keypress keydown keyup', function (e) {
   if (e.keyCode == 13) {
     e.preventDefault();
   }
});

Some notes:

Modifying various good answers here, the Enter key seems to work for keydown on all the browsers. For the alternative, I updated bind() to the on() method.

I'm a big fan of class selectors, weighing all the pros and cons and performance discussions. My naming convention is 'idSomething' to indicate jQuery is using it as an id, to separate it from CSS styling.

  • will this work for the submit button only? – Sickest May 31 '14 at 18:29
  • This works on the textbox elements in the form. As you type, and hit enter in the textbox, the default behavior submits the form. This intercepts the enter key and prevents it from submitting. – goodeye Jun 1 '14 at 21:37
  1. Do not use type="submit" for inputs or buttons.
  2. Use type="button" and use js [Jquery/angular/etc] to submit form to server.

You could make a JavaScript method to check to see if the Enter key was hit, and if it is, to stop the submit.

<script type="text/javascript">
  function noenter() {
  return !(window.event && window.event.keyCode == 13); }
</script>

Just call that on the submit method.

Not putting a submit button could do. Just put a script to the input (type=button) or add eventListener if you want it to submit the data in the form.

Rather use this

<input type="button">

than using this

<input type="submit">

I had a similiar problem, where I had a grid with "ajax textfields" (Yii CGridView) and just one submit button. Everytime I did a search on a textfield and hit enter the form submitted. I had to do something with the button because it was the only common button between the views (MVC pattern). All I had to do was remove type="submit" and put onclick="document.forms[0].submit()

I think it's well covered with all the answers, but if you are using a button with some JavaScript validation code you could just set the form's onkeypress for Enter to call your submit as expected:

<form method="POST" action="..." onkeypress="if(event.keyCode == 13) mySubmitFunction(this); return false;">

The onkeypress JS could be whatever you need to do. There's no need for a larger, global change. This is especially true if you're not the one coding the app from scratch, and you've been brought into fix someone else's web site without tearing it apart and re-testing it.

  • I realize its a variant on Tom Hubbard's answer, which I +1'd because its actually what I did myself today before searching SO for other ideas. – garlicman Jul 28 '13 at 17:58

In my specific case I had to stop ENTER from submitting the form and also simulate the clicking of the submit button. This is because the submit button had a click handler on it because we were within a modal window (inherited old code). In any case here's my combo solutions for this case.

    $('input,select').keypress(function(event) {
        // detect ENTER key
        if (event.keyCode == 13) {
            // simulate submit button click
            $("#btn-submit").click();
            // stop form from submitting via ENTER key press
            event.preventDefault ? event.preventDefault() : event.returnValue = false;
        }
    });

This use case is specifically useful for people working with IE8.

This works for me

jQuery.each($("#your_form_id").find('input'), function(){
    $(this).bind('keypress keydown keyup', function(e){
       if(e.keyCode == 13) { e.preventDefault(); }
    });
});

Something I have not seen answered here: when you tab through the elements on the page, pressing Enter when you get to the submit button will trigger the onsubmit handler on the form, but it will record the event as a MouseEvent. Here is my short solution to cover most bases:

This is not a jQuery-related answer

HTML

<form onsubmit="return false;" method=post>
  <input type="text" /><br />
  <input type="button" onclick="this.form.submit()" value="submit via mouse or keyboard" />
  <input type="button" onclick="submitMouseOnly(event)" value="submit via mouse only" />
</form>

JavaScript

window.submitMouseOnly=function(evt){
    let allow=(evt instanceof MouseEvent) && evt.x>0 && evt.y>0 && evt.screenX > 0 && evt.screenY > 0;
    if(allow)(evt.tagName=='FORM'?evt.target:evt.target.form).submit();
}

To find a working example: https://jsfiddle.net/nemesarial/6rhogva2/

I'd like to add a little CoffeeScript code (not field tested):

$ ->
    $(window).bind 'keypress', (event) ->
        if event.keyCode == 13
            unless {'TEXTAREA', 'SELECT'}[event.originalEvent.srcElement.tagName]
                event.preventDefault()

(I hope you like the nice trick in the unless clause.)

There are many good answers here already, I just want to contribute something from a UX perspective. Keyboard controls in forms are very important.

The question is how to disable from submission on keypress Enter. Not how to ignore Enter in an entire application. So consider attaching the handler to a form element, not the window.

Disabling Enter for form submission should still allow the following:

  1. Form submission via Enter when submit button is focused.
  2. Form submission when all fields are populated.
  3. Interaction with non-submit buttons via Enter.

This is just boilerplate but it follows all three conditions.

$('form').on('keypress', function(e) {
  // Register keypress on buttons.
  $attr = $(e.target).attr('type);
  if ($attr === 'button' || $attr === 'submit') {
    return true;
  }

  // Ignore keypress if all fields are not populated.
  if (e.which === 13 && !fieldsArePopulated(this)) {
    return false;
  }
});

ONLY BLOCK SUBMIT but not other, important functionality of enter key, such as creating a new paragraph in a <textarea>:

window.addEventListener('keydown', function(e){
    //set default value for variable that will hold the status of keypress
    pressedEnter = false;

    //if user pressed enter, set the variable to true
    if(event.keyCode == 13)
        pressedEnter = true;

    //we want forms to disable submit for a tenth of a second only
    setTimeout(function(){
        pressedEnter = false;
    },100)

})

//find all forms
var forms = document.getElementsByTagName('form')

//loop through forms
for(i = 0; i < forms.length; i++){
    //listen to submit event
    forms[i].addEventListener('submit', function(e){
        //if user just pressed enter, stop the submit event
        if(pressedEnter == true) {
            e.preventDefault();
            return false;
        }
    })
}
  • wondering who and why would downvote this :| what's the issue with my solution? – mate.gwozdz Sep 28 at 13:54
  • Upvoted for the contribution. The accepted answer breaks most form UI, preventing "enter" from being registered on the entire application. Not good. I think it's a good idea to allow enter to be handled in form elements, particularly buttons so I like the path you're going down. I think this can be achieved without a timeout though. For example just look at the element attribute in your event handler. Allow 'button' and 'submit' – NathanCH Oct 2 at 20:15
  • @NathanCH - This code does exactly the opposite from what you're saying. It only prevents enter from submitting the form and doesn't prevent any other functionality - for example, you might have a text field and want to use enter to create new paragraphs. – mate.gwozdz Oct 3 at 21:07

This has worked for me in all browsers after much frustration with other solutions. The name_space outer function is just to stay away from declaring globals, something I also recommend.

$(function() {window.name_space = new name_space();}); //jquery doc ready
function name_space() {
    this.is_ie = (navigator.userAgent.indexOf("MSIE") !== -1);

    this.stifle = function(event) {
        event.cancelBubble;
        event.returnValue = false;
        if(this.is_ie === false) {
            event.preventDefault();
        }
        return false;
    }

    this.on_enter = function(func) {
        function catch_key(e) {
            var enter = 13;
            if(!e) {
                var e = event;
            }
            keynum = GetKeyNum(e);
            if (keynum === enter) {
                if(func !== undefined && func !== null) {
                    func();
                }
                return name_space.stifle(e);
            }
            return true; // submit
        }

        if (window.Event) {
            window.captureEvents(Event.KEYDOWN);
            window.onkeydown = catch_key;
        }
        else {
            document.onkeydown = catch_key;
        }

        if(name_space.is_ie === false) {
            document.onkeypress = catch_key;    
        }
    }
}

Sample use:

$(function() {
    name_space.on_enter(
        function () {alert('hola!');}
    );
});

In my case I had a couple of jQuery UI autocomplete fields and textareas in a form, so I definitely wanted them to accept Enter. So I removed the type="submit" input from a form and added an anchor <a href="" id="btn">Ok</a> instead. Then I styled it as a button and added the following code:

$( '#btn' ).click( function( event ){
    event.preventDefault();
    if ( validateData() ){
        $( 'form#frm' ).append( '<input type="submit" id="frm-submit" style="display:none;"></input>' );
        setTimeout( function(){ $( '#frm-submit' ).click(); }, 500 );
    }
    return false;
});

If a user fills all required fields, validateData() succeeds and the form submits.

Use:

// Validate your form using the jQuery onsubmit function... It'll really work...

$(document).ready(function(){
   $(#form).submit(e){
       e.preventDefault();
       if(validation())
          document.form1.submit();
   });
});

function validation()
{
   // Your form checking goes here.
}

<form id='form1' method='POST' action=''>
    // Your form data
</form>

protected by Jorgesys Jan 3 '14 at 22:51

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