157

I have a class that is IComparable:

public class a : IComparable
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public a(int id)
    {
        this.Id = id;
    }

    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        return this.Id.CompareTo(((a)obj).Id);
    }
}

When I add a list of object of this class to a hash set:

a a1 = new a(1);
a a2 = new a(2);
HashSet<a> ha = new HashSet<a>();
ha.add(a1);
ha.add(a2);
ha.add(a1);

Everything is fine and ha.count is 2, but:

a a1 = new a(1);
a a2 = new a(2);
HashSet<a> ha = new HashSet<a>();
ha.add(a1);
ha.add(a2);
ha.add(new a(1));

Now ha.count is 3.

  1. Why doesn't HashSet respect a's CompareTo method.
  2. Is HashSet the best way to have a list of unique objects?
1

5 Answers 5

177

It uses an IEqualityComparer<T> (EqualityComparer<T>.Default unless you specify a different one on construction).

When you add an element to the set, it will find the hash code using IEqualityComparer<T>.GetHashCode, and store both the hash code and the element (after checking whether the element is already in the set, of course).

To look an element up, it will first use the IEqualityComparer<T>.GetHashCode to find the hash code, then for all elements with the same hash code, it will use IEqualityComparer<T>.Equals to compare for actual equality.

That means you have two options:

  • Pass a custom IEqualityComparer<T> into the constructor. This is the best option if you can't modify the T itself, or if you want a non-default equality relation (e.g. "all users with a negative user ID are considered equal"). This is almost never implemented on the type itself (i.e. Foo doesn't implement IEqualityComparer<Foo>) but in a separate type which is only used for comparisons.
  • Implement equality in the type itself, by overriding GetHashCode and Equals(object). Ideally, implement IEquatable<T> in the type as well, particularly if it's a value type. These methods will be called by the default equality comparer.

Note how none of this is in terms of an ordered comparison - which makes sense, as there are certainly situations where you can easily specify equality but not a total ordering. This is all the same as Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, basically.

If you want a set which uses ordering instead of just equality comparisons, you should use SortedSet<T> from .NET 4 - which allows you to specify an IComparer<T> instead of an IEqualityComparer<T>. This will use IComparer<T>.Compare - which will delegate to IComparable<T>.CompareTo or IComparable.CompareTo if you're using Comparer<T>.Default.

16
  • 7
    +1 Also note @tyriker's answer (that IMO should be a comment here) which points out that the simplest way to leverage said IEqualityComparer<T>.GetHashCode/Equals() is to implement Equals and GetHashCode on T itself (and while you're doing that, you'd also implement the strongly typed counterpart:- bool IEquatable<T>.Equals(T other) ) May 16, 2013 at 9:05
  • 5
    Although very accurate this answer may be somewhat confusing, especially for new users as it doesn't clearly state that for the simplest case overriding Equals and GetHashCode is enough - as mentioned in @tyriker's answer.
    – BartoszKP
    Oct 2, 2013 at 7:35
  • Imo once you implement IComparable (or IComparer for that matter) you shouldn't be asked to implement equality separately (but just GetHashCode). In a sense the comparability interfaces should inherit from equality interfaces. I do understand the performance benefits in having two separate functions (where you can optimize equality separately just by saying if something is equal or not) but still.. Very confusing otherwise when you have specified when the instances are equal in CompareTo function and framework wont consider that.
    – nawfal
    Jun 27, 2015 at 15:03
  • @nawfal not everything has a logical order. if you're comparing two things that contain a bool property it is just plain awful to have to write something like a.boolProp == b.boolProp ? 1 : 0 or should it be a.boolProp == b.boolProp ? 0 : -1 or a.boolProp == b.boolProp ? 1 : -1. Yuk! Feb 1, 2017 at 1:42
  • 1
    @Simon_Weaver it is. I do want to somehow avoid it in my hypothetical feature I was proposing.
    – nawfal
    Feb 1, 2017 at 3:24
94

Here's clarification on a part of the answer that's been left unsaid: The object type of your HashSet<T> doesn't have to implement IEqualityComparer<T> but instead just has to override Object.GetHashCode() and Object.Equals(Object obj).

Instead of this:

public class a : IEqualityComparer<a>
{
  public int GetHashCode(a obj) { /* Implementation */ }
  public bool Equals(a obj1, a obj2) { /* Implementation */ }
}

You do this:

public class a
{
  public override int GetHashCode() { /* Implementation */ }
  public override bool Equals(object obj) { /* Implementation */ }
}

It is subtle, but this tripped me up for the better part of a day trying to get HashSet to function the way it is intended. And like others have said, HashSet<a> will end up calling a.GetHashCode() and a.Equals(obj) as necessary when working with the set.

8
  • 2
    Good point. BTW as mentioned on my comment on @JonSkeet's answer, you should also implement bool IEquatable<T>.Equals(T other) for a slight efficiency gain but more importantly the clarity benefit. For obv reasons, in addition to the need to implement GetHashCode alongside IEquatable<T>, the doc for IEquatable<T> mentions that for consistency purposes you should also override the object.Equals for consistency May 16, 2013 at 9:09
  • I tried implementing this. The ovveride getHashcode works, but override bool equals gets the error: no method found to override. any idea?
    – Stefanvds
    Dec 12, 2014 at 8:36
  • Finally the info i was looking for. Thank you. Jan 3, 2017 at 15:38
  • From my comments on above answer - In your "Instead of" case, you could have public class a : IEqualityComparer<a> {, and then new HashSet<a>(a).
    – HankCa
    Feb 8, 2018 at 3:52
  • But see Jon Skeets comments above.
    – HankCa
    Feb 9, 2018 at 12:10
14

HashSet uses Equals and GetHashCode().

CompareTo is for ordered sets.

If you want unique objects, but you don't care about their iteration order, HashSet<T> is typically the best choice.

7

constructor HashSet receive object what implement IEqualityComparer for adding new object. if you whant use method in HashSet you nead overrride Equals, GetHashCode

namespace HashSet
{
    public class Employe
    {
        public Employe() {
        }

        public string Name { get; set; }

        public override string ToString()  {
            return Name;
        }

        public override bool Equals(object obj) {
            return this.Name.Equals(((Employe)obj).Name);
        }

        public override int GetHashCode() {
            return this.Name.GetHashCode();
        }
    }

    class EmployeComparer : IEqualityComparer<Employe>
    {
        public bool Equals(Employe x, Employe y)
        {
            return x.Name.Trim().ToLower().Equals(y.Name.Trim().ToLower());
        }

        public int GetHashCode(Employe obj)
        {
            return obj.Name.GetHashCode();
        }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            HashSet<Employe> hashSet = new HashSet<Employe>(new EmployeComparer());
            hashSet.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Nik" });
            hashSet.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Rob" });
            hashSet.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Joe" });
            Display(hashSet);
            hashSet.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Rob" });
            Display(hashSet);

            HashSet<Employe> hashSetB = new HashSet<Employe>(new EmployeComparer());
            hashSetB.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Max" });
            hashSetB.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Solomon" });
            hashSetB.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Werter" });
            hashSetB.Add(new Employe() { Name = "Rob" });
            Display(hashSetB);

            var union = hashSet.Union<Employe>(hashSetB).ToList();
            Display(union);
            var inter = hashSet.Intersect<Employe>(hashSetB).ToList();
            Display(inter);
            var except = hashSet.Except<Employe>(hashSetB).ToList();
            Display(except);

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        static void Display(HashSet<Employe> hashSet)
        {
            if (hashSet.Count == 0)
            {
                Console.Write("Collection is Empty");
                return;
            }
            foreach (var item in hashSet)
            {
                Console.Write("{0}, ", item);
            }
            Console.Write("\n");
        }

        static void Display(List<Employe> list)
        {
            if (list.Count == 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Collection is Empty");
                return;
            }
            foreach (var item in list)
            {
                Console.Write("{0}, ", item);
            }
            Console.Write("\n");
        }
    }
}
1
  • 1
    What if the Name is null? what's the hash value of null?
    – joe
    Jul 23, 2020 at 2:47
6

I came here looking for answers, but found that all the answers had too much info or not enough, so here is my answer...

Since you've created a custom class you need to implement GetHashCode and Equals. In this example I will use a class Student instead of a because it's easier to follow and doesn't violate any naming conventions. Here is what the implementations look like:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    return obj is Student student && Id == student.Id;
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return HashCode.Combine(Id);
}

I stumbled across this article from Microsoft that gives an incredibly easy way to implement these if you're using Visual Studio. In case it's helpful to anyone else, here are complete steps for using a custom data type in a HashSet using Visual Studio:

Given a class Student with 2 simple properties and an initializer

public class Student
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Student(int id)
    {
        this.Id = id;
    }
 }

To Implement IComparable, add : IComparable<Student> like so:

public class Student : IComparable<Student>

You will see a red squiggly appear with an error message saying your class doesn't implement IComparable. Click on suggestions or press Alt+Enter and use the suggestion to implement it.

use the suggestion to implement IComparable

You will see the method generated. You can then write your own implementation like below:

public int CompareTo(Student student)
{
    return this.Id.CompareTo(student.Id);
}

In the above implementation only the Id property is compared, name is ignored. Next right-click in your code and select Quick actions and refactorings, then Generate Equals and GetHashCode

Generate Equals and GetHashCode

A window will pop up where you can select which properties to use for hashing and even implement IEquitable if you'd like:

pop up where you can select which properties to use for hashing

Here is the generated code:

public class Student : IComparable<Student>, IEquatable<Student> {
    ...
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as Student);
    }

    public bool Equals(Student other)
    {
        return other != null && Id == other.Id;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return HashCode.Combine(Id);
    }
}

Now if you try to add a duplicate item like shown below it will be skipped:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Student s1 = new Student(1);
    Student s2 = new Student(2);
    HashSet<Student> hs = new HashSet<Student>();

    hs.Add(s1);
    hs.Add(s2);
    hs.Add(new Student(1)); //will be skipped
    hs.Add(new Student(3));
}

You can now use .Contains like so:

for (int i = 0; i <= 4; i++)
{
    if (hs.Contains(new Student(i)))
    {
        Console.WriteLine($@"Set contains student with Id {i}");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.WriteLine($@"Set does NOT contain a student with Id {i}");
    }
}

Output:

Console output

1
  • 1
    Fantastic thank you. I was struggling a bit with the other answers and then as you point out, it's built into Visual Studio anyway
    – mejobloggs
    Feb 6, 2022 at 6:46

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