94

I have a table in SQL Server. I would like to delete the top 1000 rows from it. However, I tried this, but I instead of just deleting the top 1000 rows it deleted all the rows in the table.

Here is the code:

delete from [mytab] 
select top 1000 
a1,a2,a3
from [mytab]
  • 8
    You need an ORDER BY to make TOP meaningful: see @Martin Smith's answer which is the only one of five to have this. I despair sometimes – gbn Jan 21 '12 at 20:24
  • 2
    Do you want to delete any 1000 rows? Just randomly selected? Or, for example, the top 1000 oldest rows? – Nick Chammas Jan 21 '12 at 20:55
  • 13
    You deleted all the table because delete from [mytab] is one statement, and select top ... is another. – Nick Chammas Jan 21 '12 at 21:11
  • 2
    You don't need ordering for top, depends why you are doing TOP. If you need to remove 10 million rows and have 1 GB of log space available use Delete TOP(10000) From dbo.myTable (with your select clause) and keep running it till there are no more rows to delete. Who cares if its arbitrary. Sorting only slows the query. – tvanharp Jun 6 '16 at 16:04
  • 1
    I realize that this is an ancient question (in SO years) but I do think that it is important that people consider the comments of @gbn. While his comments do not apply to my given situation (trying to delete blocks of records without causing LOCK issues but not really caring about the order in which they are deleted) they may very likely apply to YOUR situation. Make sure you consider them before blindly utilizing answers below that do not include an ORDER BY clause. – Andrew Steitz Aug 22 '16 at 15:45
179

The code you tried is in fact two statements. A DELETE followed by a SELECT.

You don't define TOP as ordered by what.

For a specific ordering criteria deleting from a CTE or similar table expression is the most efficient way.

;WITH CTE AS
(
SELECT TOP 1000 *
FROM [mytab]
ORDER BY a1
)
DELETE FROM CTE
75

May be better for sql2005+ to use:

DELETE TOP (1000)
FROM [MyTab]
WHERE YourConditions

For Sql2000:

DELETE FROM [MyTab]
WHERE YourIdField IN 
(
  SELECT TOP 1000 
    YourIdField 
  FROM [MyTab]
  WHERE YourConditions
)

BUT

If you want to delete specific subset of rows instead of arbitrary subset, you should explicitly specify order to subquery:

DELETE FROM [MyTab]
WHERE YourIdField IN 
(
  SELECT TOP 1000 
    YourIdField 
  FROM [MyTab]
  WHERE YourConditions
  ORDER BY ExplicitSortOrder
)

Thanks tp @gbn for mentioning and demanding the more clear and exact answer.

  • 3
    @gbn Maybe useless for you, but still that is exactly what the question is asking for. – Joachim Isaksson Jan 21 '12 at 20:28
  • 1
    @Joachim Isaksson: go and read up about TOP then come back. There is no such thing as TOP without an ORDER BY in sets. Alternatively, go and find me a canonical reference that proves me wrong... To save you searching, sqlblog.com/blogs/alexander_kuznetsov/archive/2009/05/20/… and blogs.technet.com/b/wardpond/archive/2007/07/19/… – gbn Jan 21 '12 at 20:30
  • 1
    @gbn No any conditions about WHICH rows to delete, so ORDER BY in subquery is useless – Oleg Dok Jan 22 '12 at 7:43
  • 1
    @gbn Did you mention WHERE in subquery - I filter 1000 arbitrary rows inside choosen criteria and delete then. Valid scenario? Yes. If I add ORDER BY NEWID() or whatever it changes nothing - I still delete 1000 rows filtered by choosen criteria – Oleg Dok Jan 22 '12 at 8:11
  • 8
    @gbn In case you're looking for a valid use of TOP without ORDER BY: what brought me here is I need to delete all rows matching some criteria but, for performance reasons, I don't want it to delete more than 10,000 rows at a time. I don't care which rows it deletes, as I will run the command again at some interval until all such rows are gone. – Richiban Oct 13 '14 at 16:09
24

As defined in the link below, you can delete in a straight forward manner

USE AdventureWorks2008R2;
GO
DELETE TOP (20) 
FROM Purchasing.PurchaseOrderDetail
WHERE DueDate < '20020701';
GO

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms175486(v=sql.105).aspx

6
delete from [mytab]
where [mytab].primarykeyid in
(
select top 1000 primarykeyid
from [mytab]
)
  • 4
    Useless: TOP without an ORDER BY gives arbitrary rows – gbn Jan 21 '12 at 20:22
  • 4
    @gbn Maybe useless for you, but still that is exactly what the question is asking for. – Joachim Isaksson Jan 21 '12 at 20:26
  • 3
    @gbn I did not claim that there is any default sort order or that the query is even in any way useful, I just reminded you that the question did not ask for one so what would you suggest ordering on? – Joachim Isaksson Jan 21 '12 at 20:40
  • 2
    @gbn I don't know why you're so hostile to everyone over something that is a starting point. I do not claim that my answer is the end all, it is merely a suggestion to help someone out. I think the importance is the keys that are coming back from the sub query here. – Jason Dam Jan 21 '12 at 21:01
  • 2
    This may be all that the asker is looking for. I would just add a note for others reading to stress that the rows deleted by such a statement are not guaranteed to be in any order. – Nick Chammas Jan 21 '12 at 21:14
2

It is fast. Try it:

DELETE FROM YourTABLE
FROM (SELECT TOP XX PK FROM YourTABLE) tbl
WHERE YourTABLE.PK = tbl.PK

Replace YourTABLE by table name, XX by a number, for example 1000, pk is the name of the primary key field of your table.

  • You are effectively creating two tables from one, and then deleting where joined. It works well when you want to delete the oldest (or newest) records from a table, since you can sort them ascending first. This t-sql is accepted by Microsoft (and it's fast). – Tequila Jan 21 '16 at 18:37
1
SET ROWCOUNT 1000;

DELETE FROM [MyTable] WHERE .....
  • 1
    When dealing with just 1000 rows, does it really matter?? If it was 100,000,000 rows then your points might be valid, but for just 1000 rows, this is by far the simplest solution proposed so far for SQL 2008. – Joe Bourne Mar 17 '14 at 9:46

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