10

Compiling polygone.h and polygone.cc gives error:

polygone.cc:5:19: error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before ‘(’ token

Code:

//polygone.h
# if !defined(__POLYGONE_H__)
# define __POLYGONE_H__

# include <iostream>

class Polygone {

    public:
        Polygone(){};
        Polygone(std::string fichier);

};

# endif

and

//polygone.cc
# include <iostream>
# include <fstream>
# include "polygone.h"

Polygone::Polygone(string nom)
{
    std::ifstream fichier (nom, ios::in);
    std::string line;

    if (fichier.is_open())
    {
        while ( fichier.good() )
        {
            getline (fichier, line);
            std::cout << line << std::endl;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        std::cerr << "Erreur a l'ouverture du fichier" << std::endl;
    }
}

//ifstream fich1 (argv[1], ios::in);

My guess is that the compiler is not recognising Polygone::Polygone(string nom) as a constructor, but, if this actually is the case, I have no idea why.

Any help?

  • 1
    Could it be that you have a semicolon after the first constructor? (Polygone() {};) – Marlon Jan 22 '12 at 0:45
  • 4
    Polygone(std::string fichier); and Polygone::Polygone(string nom) are not equivalent, since you're not using namespace std. Use Polygone::Polygone(std::string nom) for the actual implementation instead. – user529758 Jan 22 '12 at 0:47
6

The first constructor in the header should not end with a semicolon. #include <string> is missing in the header. string is not qualified with std:: in the .cpp file. Those are all simple syntax errors. More importantly: you are not using references, when you should. Also the way you use the ifstream is broken. I suggest learning C++ before trying to use it.

Let's fix this up:

//polygone.h
# if !defined(__POLYGONE_H__)
# define __POLYGONE_H__

#include <iostream>
#include <string>    

class Polygone {
public:
  // declarations have to end with a semicolon, definitions do not
  Polygone(){} // why would we needs this?
  Polygone(const std::string& fichier);
};

# endif

and

//polygone.cc
// no need to include things twice
#include "polygone.h"
#include <fstream>


Polygone::Polygone(const std::string& nom)
{
  std::ifstream fichier (nom, ios::in);


  if (fichier.is_open())
  {
    // keep the scope as tidy as possible
    std::string line;
    // getline returns the stream and streams convert to booleans
    while ( std::getline(fichier, line) )
    {
      std::cout << line << std::endl;
    }
  }
  else
  {
    std::cerr << "Erreur a l'ouverture du fichier" << std::endl;
  }
}
  • 24
    Isn't trying to use it the best way to learn it? (Which isn't to suggest that posting to SO is the best way to fix syntax errors.) – Keith Thompson Jan 22 '12 at 0:53
  • @KeithThompson I think it depends on the object you are trying to get a hold of. I think learning C++ by using it leads to a lot of frustration that can be avoided, if the basic principles and syntax are taught first. Otherwise he will shoot himself in the foot continuously. Consider the question: We haven't even gotten to the point that he still needs explicit. But for everything beyond basics I agree with you. – pmr Jan 22 '12 at 0:58
  • 2
    I agree that having a better grasp of C++ before diving into coding would be preferable, but I am scrambling to finish this assignment before it is due. This also explains why I am 'cheating' by using SO to 'learn' C++. – Marconius Jan 22 '12 at 1:15
  • Well ... the error I asked about is resolved, but other errors are showing up now ... sooo ... uuuh ... bugger. :| Dasblinkenlight'a answer actually fixed one of them. thanks – Marconius Jan 22 '12 at 1:37
  • Another thing is that identifiers containing __ are reserved for implementation use, so the include guards should use a different convention – M.M Nov 7 '14 at 1:06
2

You are missing the std namespace reference in the cc file. You should also call nom.c_str() because there is no implicit conversion from std::string to const char * expected by ifstream's constructor.

Polygone::Polygone(std::string nom) {
    std::ifstream fichier (nom.c_str(), std::ifstream::in);
    // ...
}
2

This is not only a 'newbie' scenario. I just ran across this compiler message (GCC 5.4) when refactoring a class to remove some constructor parameters. I forgot to update both the declaration and definition, and the compiler spit out this unintuitive error.

The bottom line seems to be this: If the compiler can't match the definition's signature to the declaration's signature it thinks the definition is not a constructor and then doesn't know how to parse the code and displays this error. Which is also what happened for the OP: std::string is not the same type as string so the declaration's signature differed from the definition's and this message was spit out.

As a side note, it would be nice if the compiler looked for almost-matching constructor signatures and upon finding one suggested that the parameters didn't match rather than giving this message.

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