18

Basically, what I want to do is check two integers against a given value, therefore, classically what you would do is something like this:

//just to get some values to check
int a, b;
a = (int)(Math.random()*5);
b = (int)(Math.random()*5);

//the actual thing in question
if(a == 0 || b == 0)
{
//Then do something
}

But is there a more concise format to do this? Possibly similar to this (which returns a bad operand type):

//just to get some values to check
int a, b;
a = (int)(Math.random()*5);
b = (int)(Math.random()*5);

//the actual thing in question
if((a||b) == 0)
{
//Then do something
}

12 Answers 12

25

Unfortunately there is no such construct in Java.

It this kind of comparison is frequent in your code, you can implement a small function that will perform the check for you:

public boolean oneOfEquals(int a, int b, int expected) {
    return (a == expected) || (b == expected);
}

Then you could use it like this:

if(oneOfEquals(a, b, 0)) {
    // ...
}

If you don't want to restrict yourselft to integers, you can make the above function generic:

public <T> boolean oneOfEquals(T a, T b, T expected) {
    return a.equals(expected) || b.equals(expected);
}

Note that in this case Java runtime will perform automatic boxing and unboxing for primitive types (like int), which is a performance loss.

  • Yeah, but what if I have three variables, or four, or a larger amount that for some reason aren't in an array? I'd have to rewrite this function each time to adjust to the different number of inputs. – Amndeep7 Jan 22 '12 at 16:56
  • 2
    Not exactly, you can use variable length parameter list: public <T> boolean oneOfEquals(T expected, T... actual) { ... } and a for-loop in the body of the function. I'll show you an example if you'd like to @Amndeep7. – buc Jan 22 '12 at 17:00
  • It seems simple enough to grasp, one question though, what does T... actual become? Is it a list of some sort or an array or what? – Amndeep7 Jan 22 '12 at 17:04
  • 1
    Actually it is of type T[], so you can handle it like a traditional array: for(T value : actual) { if(value.equals(expected) return true; } – buc Jan 22 '12 at 17:06
  • Thanks for this information. I'd try to upvote you as well, but I still don't have enough rep. – Amndeep7 Jan 22 '12 at 17:11
21

You can do the following in plain java

Arrays.asList(a, b, c, d).contains(x);
4

I think that a bit-wise OR:

if ((a | b) == 0) . . .

would work if you want to check specifically for 0. I'm not sure if this saves any execution time. More to the point, it makes for cryptic code, which will make the future maintainer of this code curse you (even if its yourself). I recommend sticking with the more-typing option.

Bah. I misread OP's original logic.

Another go...

If you want to test whether any one of many variables is equal to an expected value, a generic function might work:

public <T> boolean exists(T target, T... values) {
    for (T value : values) {
        if (target == null) {
            if (value == null) {
                return true;
            }
        } else if (target.equals(value)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

This will work for any number of objects of one type. Primitives will be autoboxed so it will work with them as well. Your original code will be something like:

if (test(0, a, b)) {
    // do something
}

(A better method name would be desperately needed to even consider whether this an improvement over what you have now. Even if the test expands to 3 or 4 variables, I question the need for this kind of thing.) Note that this also works with arrays:

int[] values = { . . . };
if (test(0, values)) { . . .

and it can be used to test whether an array (or any of a collection of variables) is null.

  • But is there a way to generalize this? As in, instead of just checking for 0, I can also compare these values to another variable, say an int named 'c'? – Amndeep7 Jan 22 '12 at 16:47
  • 1
    Doesn't work - if a=1; b=0;, your test fails, the original test passes. – Mat Jan 22 '12 at 16:47
  • No that's reversed, that could replace a == 0 && b == 0. Using bitwise and doesn't help (for two different powers of two, for example) – harold Jan 22 '12 at 16:47
  • 1
    @grapeot modulo power-of-two arithmetic has zero divisors, which means a*b=0 does not imply that either a or b are zero. – harold Jan 22 '12 at 16:55
  • 2
    @grapeot no.. because that would incorrect. If a*b happens to be zero, there are values for a and b such that neither a nor b are zero. For example a=0x80000000 b=2 – harold Jan 22 '12 at 16:59
3

As referenced from this answer:

In Java 8+, you might use a Stream and anyMatch. Something like

if (Stream.of(b, c, d).anyMatch(x -> x.equals(a))) {
    // ... do something ...
}

Note that this has the chance of running slower than the other if checks, due to the overhead of wrapping these elements into a stream to begin with.

2
if(a == 0 || b == 0)
{
//Then do something
}

Why not keep it readable? What is not concise about this? On the other hand,

a = (int)(Math.random()*5);

involves an unnecessary cast. Why not just use Random and invoke nextInt()?

  • I was never aware of that class, I had always been taught to use Math.random(), especially since that can become easily adaptable to the range of values I wish to create. – Amndeep7 Jan 22 '12 at 16:54
  • 1
    It's easy to range bound your values using Random. For example, a random number between 1-6: 1 + myRand.nextInt(5); – Amir Afghani Jan 22 '12 at 16:58
2

For this example, you can do

if (a * b == 0)

or for more variables

if (a * b * c * d == 0)

while more concise it may not be as clear. For larger values, you need to cast to a long to avoid an overflow.

  • 1
    You may need something larger than a long for more than two variables, if they can all be the full range.. – harold Jan 22 '12 at 17:37
  • Very true. For larger types you need to check each one. But for values 0 - 4 it should be safe. – Peter Lawrey Jan 22 '12 at 17:39
2

You could put the integers in a set and see if it contains the given value. Using Guava:

if(newHashSet(a, b).contains(0)){
    // do something
}

But two simple int comparisons are probably easier to understand in this case.

2

Here's a modification of @buc's answer that can take any number of any arguments:

public <T> boolean oneOfEquals(T expected, T... os) {
    for (T o : os) {
        if (expected.equals(o)) return true;
    }
    return false;
}
1

Even if you have used the bit-wise operation as Ted suggested, the expressions are not equal, since one requires at least one of the variables to be zero and the second requires both of them to be zero.

Regarding your question, there is no such shortcut in Java.

1

You can try this code:

public static boolean match (Object ref, Object... objects)
{
    if (ref == null)
        return false;
    //
    for (Object obj : objects)
        if (obj.equals (ref))
            return true;
    //
    return false;   
}   //  match

So if you can check this way:

if (match (reference, "123", "124", "125"))
    ;   //  do something
1

In Java 8 we can achieve the same by using the below method:

private boolean methodName(int variant,int... args){
        if(args.length > 0){ return Arrays.stream(args).anyMatch( x -> x == variant); }
        return false;
    }

The given method will return true if the variant will match any possible input(s). This is used for or condition.

In the same way, if you want to do &&(and) condition then you just need to used other Java 8 methods:

Note: These methods take Predicate as an argument.

anyMatch: return true the moment the first predicate returns true otherwise false.

allMatch: return true if all the predicates return true otherwise false.

noneMatch: return true if none of the predicates return true otherwise false.

Performance Note: This is good when you have enough amount of data to check as it has some overhead but it works really well when you use this for enough amount of data. normal way is good for just two conditions.

0

There is no special syntax for that. You could make a function for that. Assuming at least Java 1.5:

public <T> boolean eitherOneEquals(T o1, T o2, T expectedValue) {
  return o1.equals(expectedValue) || o2.equals(expectedValue);
}

if(eitherOneEquals(o1, o2, expectedValue)) {
   // do something...
}

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