I'm on OSX and I need to put something like this, alias blah="/usr/bin/blah" in a config file but I don't know where the config file is.

  • 3
    Do you mean .bash_profile? – Kjuly Jan 23 '12 at 6:18
  • Tangentially, this particular alias is basically redundant unless you are specifically trying to override he shell's PATH resolution for this specific command. If /usr/bin is in your PATH (which really it must be) then blah will run from there just fine without this alias, too, unless there is also say /usr/local/bin/blah and /usr/local/bin is before /usr/bin in your PATH but you still want to prefer /usr/bin/blah and cannot for some reason simply remove or rename /usr/local/bin/blah. – tripleee Jan 5 at 5:49
  • Even then this is a dubious, hackish solution which should come with a big fat ugly comment with a warning message telling you how this will bite your shapely lower abdomen, and another saying "I told you so" for each time this happened. – tripleee Jan 5 at 5:55
  • For all the automation lovers: I personally add addAlias() { echo "alias $1='$2' " >> ~/.bash_profile to my bash_profile and then I source it and run addAlias hi 'echo "hi" ' . Source bash profile and type hi to see it. – devssh Jan 23 at 7:35

10 Answers 10

up vote 225 down vote accepted

You can add an alias or a function in your startup script file. Usually this is .bashrc, .bash_login or .profile file in your home directory.

Since these files are hidden you will have to do an ls -a to list them. If you don't have one you can create one.


If I remember correctly, when I had bought my Mac, the .bash_login file wasn't there. I had to create it for myself so that I could put prompt info, alias, functions, etc. in it.

Here are the steps if you would like to create one:

  1. Start up Terminal
  2. Type cd ~/ to go to your home folder
  3. Type touch .bash_profile to create your new file.
  4. Edit .bash_profile with your favorite editor (or you can just type open -e .bash_profile to open it in TextEdit.
  5. Type . .bash_profile to reload .bash_profile and update any alias you add.
  • 6
    Awesome, thanks @jaypal! Is the command source .bash_profile an alternative to step 5? – Ian Campbell Sep 3 '13 at 3:10
  • 9
    Yes on my OSX Mavericks there was no .bash_profile in my home dir. Creating it, adding the alias to it, and then initiating it with the . .bash_profile command worked. – Bradley Flood Jun 26 '14 at 1:27
  • .bash_profile works for me! :) .bashrc didn't on El Capitan – Parth Apr 20 '16 at 8:00
  • 2
    On OSX El Capitan .bash_profile works. If it doesn’t automatically load when you open a terminal window, it is probably because it was created without executable permission. This command will fix it and it should automatically load for future sessions: chmod u+x .bash_profile – Mischinab Jul 5 '16 at 13:09
  • 1
    .bash_profile profile is locked how can i update this file – amit gupta Jan 4 '17 at 6:52

On OS X you want to use ~/.bash_profile. This is because by default Terminal.app opens a login shell for each new window.

See more about the different configuration files and when they are used here: What's the difference between .bashrc, .bash_profile, and .environment?

and in relation to OSX here: About .bash_profile, .bashrc, and where should alias be written in?

  • it works in OSX Sierra too – rikpg Oct 5 '16 at 13:59

I just open zshrc with sublime, and edit it.

subl .zshrc

And add this on sublime:

alias blah="/usr/bin/blah"

Run this in terminal:

source ~/.bashrc

Done.

  • 3
    This is confused. If your shell is Bash, many other answers on this page are more detailed and helpful. If you use Zsh instead of Bash, then obviously you should source .zshrc at the end to load in the changes you made into your currently running shell instance. – tripleee Jan 5 at 5:41

In my .bashrc file the following lines were there by default:

# Alias definitions.
# You may want to put all your additions into a separate file like
# ~/.bash_aliases, instead of adding them here directly.
# See /usr/share/doc/bash-doc/examples in the bash-doc package.

if [ -f ~/.bash_aliases ]; then
    . ~/.bash_aliases
fi

Hence, in my platform .bash_aliases is the file used for aliases by default (and the one I use). I'm not an OS X user, but I guess that if you open your .bashrc file, you'll be able to identify what's the file commonly used for aliases in your platform.

  • 2
    this didnt work for me on osx but works in Ubuntu – toobsco42 Jul 29 '13 at 22:01
  • This works for me nicely, OS X 10.10 – kibin Aug 27 '14 at 12:19
  • If the profile doesn’t automatically load when you open a terminal window, it is probably missing the executable permission. This command will fix it and it should automatically load for future sessions: chmod u+x .bash_profile – Mischinab Jul 5 '16 at 13:13
  • @Mischinab No, the file just needs to be readable in order for Bash to read it as its configuration file. Making it executable is technically harmless but unnecessary. I would discourage it on nontechnical grounds (you might end up confusing yourself and/or others). – tripleee Jan 5 at 5:45
cd /etc
sudo vi bashrc

Add the following like:

alias ll="ls -lrt"

Finally restart Terminal.

  • 1
    After adding alias. Run 'source' on your '.bash_profile' file. Ex: source ~/.bash_profile (command which activates/ reloads the bash aliases) – UIResponder Jul 10 '17 at 13:01

The config file for scripts and programs is ~/.bashrc and the config file that gets loaded when you use Terminal is ~/.bash_login.

I think the best way is to just have everything in ~/.bashrc.

For your specific question just enter (this will overwrite any existing ~/.bashrc):

echo "alias blah=\"/usr/bin/blah\"" >>~/.bashrc

into the Terminal and a ~/.bashrc file will be created with your new alises. After that just edit the file to add new aliases, functions, settings etc.

  • 4
    Shouldn't you use >> instead of > so that it appends to the file rather than replacing everything in it? – Jonny Apr 9 '17 at 21:41
  1. Go to home
  2. Open .bashrc
  3. Create alias at bottom of the file

    alias alias_name='command to do'
    eg: alias cdDesktop='cd /Desktop'
    
  4. Save the file

  5. source .bashrc

    source ~/.bashrc
    
  6. Open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) & type cdDesktop & press enter

If you put blah="/usr/bin/blah" in your ~/.bashrc then you can use $blah in your login shell as a substitute for typing /usr/bin/blah

  • The dollar sign is emphatically not in any way necessary, useful, or correct here. – tripleee Jan 5 at 5:48

You probably want to edit the .bashrc file in your home directory.

To create permanent alias shortcut, put it in .bash_profile file and point .bashrc file to .bash_profile file. Follow these steps (I am creating an alias command called bnode to run babel transpiler on ES6 code):

  1. Go to terminal command prompt and type “cd” (this will take you to home directory. Note: even though your programming files may be located on your “D: drive”, your “.bash” files may be located on your “C: drive” )
  2. To see location of home directory, type “pwd” (this will show you the home directory path and where the .bash files are probably located)
  3. To see all dot "." files in home directory, type “ls -la” (this will show ALL files including hidden dot "." files)
  4. You will see 2 files: “.bash_profile” and “.bashrc”
  5. Open .bashrc file in VS Code Editor or your IDE and enter “source ~/.bash_profile” in first line (to point .bashrc file to .bash_profile)
  6. Open .bash_profile file in VS Code Editor and enter “alias bnode='./node_modules/.bin/babel-node'” (to create permanent bnode shortcut to execute as bash command)
  7. Save and close both files
  8. Now open the file you want to execute (index.js) and open in terminal command prompt and run file by using command “bnode index.js”
  9. Now your index.js file will execute but before creating bnode alias in .bash_profile file you would get the error "bash: bnode command not found" and it would not recognize and give errors on some ES6 code.
  10. Helpful link to learn about dotfiles: https://dotfiles.github.io/

Hope this helps! Good luck!

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