What exactly is the difference between the inline and inline-block values of CSS display?

up vote 1230 down vote accepted

A visual answer

Imagine a <span> element inside a <div>. If you give the <span> element a height of 100px and a red border for example, it will look like this with

display: inline

display: inline

display: inline-block

display: inline-block

display: block

enter image description here

Code: http://jsfiddle.net/Mta2b/

Elements with display:inline-block are like display:inline elements, but they can have a width and a height. That means that you can use an inline-block element as a block while flowing it within text or other elements.

Difference of supported styles as summary:

  • inline: only margin-left, margin-right, padding-left, padding-right
  • inline-block: margin, padding, height, width
  • 4
    Great intuition. So the only difference is that the height attribute of inline elements cannot be set? – user2316667 Jun 18 '14 at 20:26
  • 7
    @user2316667 and width – Oscar Calderon Jan 6 '16 at 14:32
  • 2
    @user2316667 and @OscarCalderon: also, inline elements don't care vertical margins & paddings and the next element will be placed at the same line (no line break after it). the block elements like as p, div get a whole width line (force a line break) but respect width/height and all horizontal/vertical padding/margins. Inline-block elements have same behavior as block but without whole line break (other elements can be placed beside them) – S.Serpooshan Jan 4 '17 at 7:43
  • 1
    padding-top and padding-right also affects the inline element's display effect, causing some mess. – tomwang1013 Aug 9 '17 at 9:35
  • 2
    @manuman94 No, it doesn't mean that. There are use cases for all the different display types. – splattne Nov 23 '17 at 13:20

display: inline; is a display mode to use in a sentence. For instance, if you have a paragraph and want to highlight a single word you do:

<p>
    Pellentesque habitant morbi <em>tristique</em> senectus
    et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas.
</p>

The <em> element has a display: inline; by default, because this tag is always used in a sentence. The <p> element has a display: block; by default, because it's neither a sentence nor in a sentence, it's a block of sentences.

An element with display: inline; cannot have a height or a width or a vertical margin. An element with display: block; can have a width, height and margin.
If you want to add a height to the <em> element, you need to set this element to display: inline-block;. Now you can add a height to the element and every other block style (the block part of inline-block), but it is placed in a sentence (the inline part of inline-block).

  • 11
    Great answer! tl;dr - If you want to resize inline elements you could be using inline-block as the display type. – errorprone Aug 1 '13 at 7:25
  • 7
    Small correction: inline elements can have horizontal margin (right, left), but not vertical margin (top, bottom) – whyleee Feb 6 '14 at 23:09
  • 1
    Good answer because you mentioned about what we can/can't do when choosing one of the display values. – ha9u63ar Aug 16 '15 at 22:06

One thing not mentioned in answers is inline element can break among lines while inline-block can't (and obviously block)! So inline elements can be useful to style sentences of text and blocks inside them, but as they can't be padded you can use line-height instead.

<div style="width: 350px">
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. <div style="display: inline; background: #F00; color: #FFF">Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.</div> Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
</div>
<hr/>
<div style="width: 350px">
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. <div style="display: inline-block; background: #F00; color: #FFF">Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.</div> Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.
</div>

enter image description here

All answers above contribute important info on the original question.

However there is a generalization that seems wrong.

It is possible to set width and height to at least one (I can think of) inline element.

Both accepted answers here and on this duplicate state that this is not possible but this seems not like a valid general rule.

Example?

<img src="#" />

img {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  border= 1px solid red;
}
  • Actually, img-tag has display-inline as their default display value. So that's why it is possible to set width and height. – Alex Aug 15 '17 at 13:13
  • img is an inline element--> developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Inline_elements... So basically you are saying more or less exactly the same thing I am saying and you are downvoting?? – alexandros84 Aug 16 '17 at 5:18
  • 2
    No, I'm not. img-tags are a "replaced elements" which basically means the content is replaced so it behaves like an inline-block element. And yes the actual default property (the by the browser computed property is inline). But the only reason for that is because inline-block wasn't introduced until CSS2 and there for it is an "inline element behaving like an inline-block element" because it is replaced by its content. i.e you are not setting height/width to the element, you are setting it on its content - Wierd, yes. I know. drafts.csswg.org/css2/conform.html#replaced-element – Alex Aug 17 '17 at 5:13
  • That is actually interesting what you are saying. Give me some time to research and re-edit and maybe take back the downvote and upvote instead..! In the end of the day I honestly feel already that this discussion is contributing to the completeness of the whole debate. – alexandros84 Aug 17 '17 at 8:17
  • Sure, leave a comment when you have updated so I get a notification :) – Alex Aug 17 '17 at 9:21

protected by dippas Jun 22 '16 at 12:15

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