3

I want to implement a dictionary that creates its own elements on the fly only when they are accessed (not in advance). To do that I would like to use a getter method, but I simply don't find any information how to declare a getter in the context of dictionary elements.

I do understand how to add a getter to the whole dictionary (which must return a dictionary when called), but what I want to do is implement a getter that is called when a single element in the dictionary is accessed so I can create that element on the fly. That getter must receive the key that is used for the request as a parameter and it must return the corresponding value.

I do not find any syntax for that task in the docs.

3

3 Answers 3

5

You just need to reimplement the indexer on Dictionary<,>

    public class MyDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    public new TValue this[TKey key]
    {
        get
        {
            TValue value;
            if (!TryGetValue(key, out value))
            {
                value = Activator.CreateInstance<TValue>();
                Add(key, value);
            }
            return value;
        }
        set { base[key] = value; }
    } 
}

If you need a more sophisticated value instantiation, you can use an activator function

 public class MyDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    readonly Func<TKey, TValue> _activator;

    public MyDictionary(Func<TKey, TValue> activator)
    {
        _activator = activator;
    }

    public new TValue this[TKey key]
    {
        get
        {
            TValue value;
            if (!TryGetValue(key, out value))
            {
                value = _activator(key);
                Add(key, value);
            }
            return value;
        }
        set { base[key] = value; }
    } 
}

Usage:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var dict = new MyDictionary<int, string>(x => string.Format("Automatically created Value for key {0}", x));
    dict[1] = "Value for key 1";
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(dict[i]);
    }
    Console.Read();
}
4
  • Whow. Great stuff! Many thanks for pointing me into this direction.
    – Jpsy
    Commented Jan 23, 2012 at 17:06
  • Kev, I am struggling with the usage of your two classes. Could you edit your answer and give a short usage example for both of them? That would be of great help. Thanks!
    – Jpsy
    Commented Jan 24, 2012 at 9:14
  • 1
    @Jpsy what exactly is your problem? It should be pretty straightforward. See the usage example i added
    – kev
    Commented Jan 24, 2012 at 9:55
  • I was fiddeling around with the first class and couldn't seem to get id doing anything but storing and retrieving values that were setted/getted from Main. But your edit helped. Thanks!
    – Jpsy
    Commented Jan 24, 2012 at 12:26
0

While the answer of Kev is perfectly correct and given on a professional level it still gave me a hard time (and initiated a lot of fruitful learning - thanks Kev!). As you can tell I am a learner of C# and there are many concepts that I still have to assimilate. I want to add an answer to my own question here in case anybody else has the same problem and is on a similar level of understanding as me. Maybe this will save some livetime.

Kev used Generics in his answer - a great concept introduced with C#2. To simplify the answer I want to show it without Generics and with a lot of comments added that give hints to all concepts that I had to look up (and that were partially not easy to find):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace DictionaryElementsGetter_Test {

  // class inherits from Dictionary<int, string>
  public class MyDictionary : Dictionary<int, string> {
    // new: hide element of base class to redefine it in derived class.
    //      see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/435f1dw2.aspx
    // string this[int key]: create an indexer
    //                       (actually: replace the indexer of base class, because of "new")
    //                       see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2549tw02.aspx
    new public string this[int key] {
      get {
        string value;
        // out: pass argument by reference instead of by value
        //      This is the standard definition of TryGetValue.
        //      Beside the bool result that indicates the existence of the key-value-pair,
        //      TryGetValue also returns the value itself into this reference parameter (if key is found).
        //      see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee332485.aspx
        if( !TryGetValue( key, out value ) ) {
          value = "abc" + key + "def";
          Add( key, value );
          // just to see when the getter really did an Add():
          Console.Write( "ADDED!... " );
        }
        return value;
      }
      // base: access element of the base class Dictionary<int, string>
      //       see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hfw7t1ce(v=vs.100).aspx
      set { base[key] = value; }
    }
  }


  class Program {
    static void Main( string[] args ) {

      var dict = new MyDictionary();
      dict[1] = "EXTERNAL VALUE";

      for( int i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) {
        Console.WriteLine( i + ": " + dict[i] );
      }
      /* 
      Output:
        ADDED!... 0: abc0def
        1: EXTERNAL VALUE
        ADDED!... 2: abc2def
      */
      for( int i = 0; i < 3; i++ ) {
        Console.WriteLine( i + ": " + dict[i] );
      }
      /* 
      Output:
        0: abc0def
        1: EXTERNAL VALUE
        2: abc2def
      */

      Console.ReadKey();

    }
  }
}
-1

It's already implemented in the framework. If you call

Dictionary<int, string> _myDictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>();

_myDictionary[1] = "Hello";
_myDictionary[2] = "World!";

you will have your dictionary populated with the key-value pairs <1, "Hello">, <2, "World!">

3
  • 2
    You've demonstrated setters; OP is asking about getters.
    – Gabe
    Commented Jan 23, 2012 at 13:10
  • Sorry Andrew, this is not what I am looking for.
    – Jpsy
    Commented Jan 23, 2012 at 13:10
  • @Jpsy could you clarify? Do you mean string aValue = _myDictionary[1]? If so then you need to be careful as any type that is immutable or a value type cannot be updated once returned Commented Jan 23, 2012 at 13:11

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