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var s= new Date().getHours();       // 20
var m= new Date().getMinutes();     // 38
document.write(s,m);                // returns 2038

var time = s,m;
document.write(time);               // returns only 20

var time = s+m;
document.write(time);               // returns 58

How can I declare a time variable which returns 2038 using s and m variables ?

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1

Cast one to a string.

var time = ''+s+m;
document.write(time);
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You have to make sure js knows its a string first.

var time = "" + s + m;
0

The longer answer is that JavaScript applies some rules when it sees code like this.

In this case document.write(s,m) is just outputting each value:

var s= new Date().getHours();       // 20
var m= new Date().getMinutes();     // 38
document.write(s,m);                // returns 2038

The following is declaring two variables (separated by a comma), one called time and one called m, and the value contained in variable s is being assigned to time. With JavaScript scoping rules, you can declare e.g. var m as often as you like in a function and it will always refer to the same variable m:

var time = s,m;
document.write(time);               // returns only 20

JavaScript uses + for both addition and concatenation, and will try to coerce variables to match the type of the first variable in order to decide whether it is to perform addition or concatenation. In this case s is a number so it will try to perform addition on the two values:

var time = s+m;
document.write(time);               // returns 58

The correct JavaScript idiom for this is to put an empty string at the beginning of the expression and JavaScript will attempt to coerce subsequent variables to that type:

var time = '' + s + m;
document.write(time); // returns 2038

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