I'm having a performance problem in SQLite with a SELECT COUNT(*) on a large tables.

As I didn't yet receive a usable answer and I did some further testing, I edited my question to incorporate my new findings.

I have 2 tables:

CREATE TABLE Table1 (
Key INTEGER NOT NULL,
... several other fields ...,
Status CHAR(1) NOT NULL,
Selection VARCHAR NULL,
CONSTRAINT PK_Table1 PRIMARY KEY (Key ASC))

CREATE Table2 (
Key INTEGER NOT NULL,
Key2 INTEGER NOT NULL,
... a few other fields ...,
CONSTRAINT PK_Table2 PRIMARY KEY (Key ASC, Key2 ASC))

Table1 has around 8 million records and Table2 has around 51 million records, and the databasefile is over 5GB.

Table1 has 2 more indexes:

CREATE INDEX IDX_Table1_Status ON Table1 (Status ASC, Key ASC)
CREATE INDEX IDX_Table1_Selection ON Table1 (Selection ASC, Key ASC)

"Status" is required field, but has only 6 distinct values, "Selection" is not required and has only around 1.5 million values different from null and only around 600k distinct values.

I did some tests on both tables, you can see the timings below, and I added the "explain query plan" for each request (QP). I placed the database file on an USB-memorystick so i could remove it after each test and get reliable results without interference of the disk cache. Some requests are faster on USB (I suppose due to lack of seektime), but some are slower (table scans).

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table1
    Time: 105 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table1 USING COVERING INDEX IDX_Table1_Selection(~1000000 rows)
SELECT COUNT(Key) FROM Table1
    Time: 153 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table1 (~1000000 rows)
SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE Key = 5123456
    Time: 5 ms
    QP: SEARCH TABLE Table1 USING INTEGER PRIMARY KEY (rowid=?) (~1 rows)
SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 73 AND Key > 5123456 LIMIT 1
    Time: 16 sec
    QP: SEARCH TABLE Table1 USING INDEX IDX_Table1_Status (Status=?) (~3 rows)
SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE Selection = 'SomeValue' AND Key > 5123456 LIMIT 1
    Time: 9 ms
    QP: SEARCH TABLE Table1 USING INDEX IDX_Table1_Selection (Selection=?) (~3 rows)

As you can see the counts are very slow, but normal selects are fast (except for the 2nd one, which took 16 seconds).

The same goes for Table2:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table2
    Time: 528 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table2 USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_Table2_1(~1000000 rows)
SELECT COUNT(Key) FROM Table2
    Time: 249 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table2 (~1000000 rows)
SELECT * FROM Table2 WHERE Key = 5123456 AND Key2 = 0
    Time: 7 ms
    QP: SEARCH TABLE Table2 USING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_Table2_1 (Key=? AND Key2=?) (~1 rows)

Why is SQLite not using the automatically created index on the primary key on Table1 ? And why, when he uses the auto-index on Table2, it still takes a lot of time ?

I created the same tables with the same content and indexes on SQL Server 2008 R2 and there the counts are nearly instantaneous.

One of the comments below suggested executing ANALYZE on the database. I did and it took 11 minutes to complete. After that, I ran some of the tests again:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table1
    Time: 104 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table1 USING COVERING INDEX IDX_Table1_Selection(~7848023 rows)
SELECT COUNT(Key) FROM Table1
    Time: 151 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table1 (~7848023 rows)
SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 73 AND Key > 5123456 LIMIT 1
    Time: 5 ms
    QP: SEARCH TABLE Table1 USING INTEGER PRIMARY KEY (rowid>?) (~196200 rows)
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table2
    Time: 529 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table2 USING COVERING INDEX sqlite_autoindex_Table2_1(~51152542 rows)
SELECT COUNT(Key) FROM Table2
    Time: 249 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table2 (~51152542 rows)

As you can see, the queries took the same time (except the query plan is now showing the real number of rows), only the slower select is now also fast.

Next, I create dan extra index on the Key field of Table1, which should correspond to the auto-index. I did this on the original database, without the ANALYZE data. It took over 23 minutes to create this index (remember, this is on an USB-stick).

CREATE INDEX IDX_Table1_Key ON Table1 (Key ASC)

Then I ran the tests again:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table1
    Time: 4 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table1 USING COVERING INDEX IDX_Table1_Key(~1000000 rows)
SELECT COUNT(Key) FROM Table1
    Time: 167 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table2 (~1000000 rows)
SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 73 AND Key > 5123456 LIMIT 1
    Time: 17 sec
    QP: SEARCH TABLE Table1 USING INDEX IDX_Table1_Status (Status=?) (~3 rows)

As you can see, the index helped with the count(*), but not with the count(Key).

Finaly, I created the table using a column constraint instead of a table constraint:

CREATE TABLE Table1 (
Key INTEGER PRIMARY KEY ASC NOT NULL,
... several other fields ...,
Status CHAR(1) NOT NULL,
Selection VARCHAR NULL)

Then I ran the tests again:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Table1
    Time: 6 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table1 USING COVERING INDEX IDX_Table1_Selection(~1000000 rows)
SELECT COUNT(Key) FROM Table1
    Time: 28 sec
    QP: SCAN TABLE Table1 (~1000000 rows)
SELECT * FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 73 AND Key > 5123456 LIMIT 1
    Time: 10 sec
    QP: SEARCH TABLE Table1 USING INDEX IDX_Table1_Status (Status=?) (~3 rows)

Although the query plans are the same, the times are a lot better. Why is this ?

The problem is that ALTER TABLE does not permit to convert an existing table and I have a lot of existing databases which i can not convert to this form. Besides, using a column contraint instead of table constraint won't work for Table2.

Has anyone any idea what I am doing wrong and how to solve this problem ?

I used System.Data.SQLite version 1.0.74.0 to create the tables and to run the tests I used SQLiteSpy 1.9.1.

Thanks,

Marc

  • 4
    If you have performance problems with SQLite, the solution is usually to move up to a bigger DB server (I recommend Postgres over MS SQL). – Borealid Jan 24 '12 at 14:57
  • I'm not having any other performance problems, all other selects are fast (and use the correct indexes), inserts and updates are fast, it's only the count that bothers me. – Marc Jan 24 '12 at 15:08
  • 1
    @Borealid: Postgres also uses a full table scan for COUNT queries without a WHERE clause, so switching to Postgres won't buy you any performance advantage for this query. – limscoder Feb 27 '12 at 16:39
  • 1
    @limscoder But you can then do triggers maintaining the information. Or spend the time you save on your normal queries by having them hot in RAM counting. Also, InnoDB isn't much faster in that respect, and MyISAM doesn't have transactions... – Borealid Feb 27 '12 at 16:48
  • 1
    @borealis SQLite also supports triggers, so the mechanism to keep track of the count would be the same. – limscoder May 26 '12 at 16:23

From http://old.nabble.com/count(*)-slow-td869876.html

SQLite always does a full table scan for count(*). It
does not keep meta information on tables to speed this
process up.

Not keeping meta information is a deliberate design
decision. If each table stored a count (or better, each
node of the btree stored a count) then much more updating
would have to occur on every INSERT or DELETE. This
would slow down INSERT and DELETE, even in the common
case where count(*) speed is unimportant.

If you really need a fast COUNT, then you can create
a trigger on INSERT and DELETE that updates a running
count in a separate table then query that separate
table to find the latest count.

Of course, it's not worth keeping a FULL row count if you
need COUNTs dependent on WHERE clauses (i.e. WHERE field1 > 0 and field2 < 1000000000).

  • 1
    Sorry for the late reply, i've been sick a few days. I've already posted a link to that same post in one of my comments. I think adding triggers would be too penalizing on mass inserts and deletes. I think it would be best keep track of the table count at the end of each insert and/or delete transaction, so the counter is only updated once and not on every insert/delete. – Marc Feb 24 '12 at 13:28
  • Also, COUNT(1) should be faster than COUNT(*) and even COUNT("id"). – Alix Axel Feb 1 '15 at 21:20
  • @AlixAxel in all my tests COUNT() and COUNT(*) are the fastest ones, COUNT(1) taking double and COUNT(ROWID) taking triple the time. – springy76 Aug 22 '16 at 12:05
  • @springy76, that seems illogical. Could you share the schema of your table and amount of rows you are benchmarking with? – Alix Axel Aug 22 '16 at 12:52
  • @AlixAxel The table is simple CREATE TABLE [Elements] ([ElementId] integer PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL,[ParentId] integer REFERENCES [Elements] ([ElementId]), [Name] nvarchar, .... and contains somewhat over 2 million rows. EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN is always the same (USING one of the indexes as COVERING INDEX) but COUNT() executes in ~200ms, COUNT(1) in ~400ms and COUNT(rowid) takes ~600ms. MAX(rowid) executes in 0 ms. – springy76 Aug 22 '16 at 13:05

If you haven't DELETEd any records, doing:

SELECT MAX(_ROWID_) FROM "table" LIMIT 1;

Will avoid the full-table scan. Note that _ROWID_ is a SQLite identifier.

  • Should be the best answer. Returns instantly and gives a good approximation (usually all you want) – easytiger Jan 30 '15 at 15:21
  • 1
    Confirming, this returns a value within a few ms for my DB with 115 million records in a table. Doing a full COUNT(*) never actually completed (I gave up waiting after 4 hours). – Nick Shaw May 21 '15 at 13:57
  • 1
    This is good but bear in mind what Alix has already said - even if you've deleted a single record in this table - ever, you'll get incorrect results (since ROWID is an ever incrementing record ID, and 'deletes' would not cause the ROWID to decrement). – strangetimes Sep 28 '16 at 17:00

Do not count the stars, count the records! Or in other language, never issue

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM tablename;

use

SELECT COUNT(ROWID) FROM tablename;

Call EXPLAIN QUERY PLAN for both to see the difference. Make sure you have an index in place containing all columns mentioned in the WHERE clause.

  • Didn't seem to make a difference for me. – Fidel Feb 7 '14 at 22:22
  • @Fidel Depends on your database model and settings. In my experiment, SQLite did a full scan for asterisk search instead of index search when used with ROWID for full table count. Maybe I have also overlooked something else, I don't claim being perfect. However, I still recommend using explain query plan! Just force the DB to use the index on PK instead of full scan and watch out for OS caching effect as Arnaud comments below. May your queries always be quick! – Thinkeye Feb 10 '14 at 13:53
  • 1
    This is wrong in most cases. At least in all my tables searching by rowid takes 22secs, vs a count of 4 secs – easytiger Jan 30 '15 at 15:17

This may not help much, but you can run the ANALYZE command to rebuild statistics about your database. Try running "ANALYZE;" to rebuild statistics about the entire database, then run your query again and see if it is any faster.

  • I executed the ANALYZE command, it took a long time to complete, but it did not change the result, the count was still slow. – Marc Jan 25 '12 at 16:19
  • ANALYZE fixed the issue for my DB when doing a LEFT JOIN – Steve Tauber Oct 15 '12 at 21:14

On the matter of the column constraint, SQLite maps columns that are declared to be INTEGER PRIMARY KEY to the internal row id (which in turn admits a number of internal optimizations). Theoretically, it could do the same for a separately-declared primary key constraint, but it appears not to do so in practice, at least with the version of SQLite in use. (System.Data.SQLite 1.0.74.0 corresponds to core SQLite 3.7.7.1. You might want to try re-checking your figures with 1.0.79.0; you shouldn't need to change your database to do that, just the library.)

  • I tried both queries (count(*) and count(key)) with the latest version of System.Data.SQlite (1.0.79.0) and I obtained the same results as before. – Marc Feb 9 '12 at 10:22
  • As I had to write a little test program (because SQLIteSpy uses an older version of SQLite, 3.7.8), I tried it both in 32 and 64bits, but I obtained the same results for both. – Marc Feb 9 '12 at 10:54

The output for the fast queries all start with the text "QP: SEARCH". Whilst those for the slow queries start with text "QP: SCAN", which suggests that sqlite is performing a scan of the entire table in order to generate the count.

Googling for "sqlite table scan count" finds the following, which suggests that using a full table scan to retrieve a count is just the way sqlite works, and is therefore probably unavoidable.

As a workaround, and given that status has only eight values, I wondered if you could get a count quickly using a query like the following?

select 1 where status=1 union select 1 where status=2 ...

then count the rows in the result. This is clearly ugly, but it might work if it persuades sqlite to run the query as a search rather than a scan. The idea of returning "1" each time is to avoid the overhead of returning real data.

  • I already found this post from the author of SQLite, so i already gave up hope, as adding triggers would be too penalizing on inserts and deletes. But i tried your suggestion. I first tried SELECT COUNT (*) FROM table1 where Status in (1,2,3,4,5,6), it executed in 86 secs (a bit faster), the QP: SEARCH TABLE Table1 USING COVERING INDEX IDX_Table1_Status (Status=?) (~60 rows); EXECUTE LIST SUBQUERY 1. Better but not good enough. – Marc Feb 17 '12 at 14:32
  • The I tried your union suggestion. SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT 1 FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 1 UNION SELECT 1 FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 2 UNION...) returned 1, the same for SUM(*), I guess due to the characteristics a the union. SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT 1 FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 1 UNION SELECT 2 FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 2 UNION...) returned 6. So finaly i tried SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT Key FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 1 UNION SELECT Key FROM Table1 WHERE Status = 2 UNION...) which returned the correct result, but very slow (116 secs). Thanks for the suggestion though. – Marc Feb 17 '12 at 14:37
  • And my first try (SELECT COUNT (*) FROM table1 where Status in (1,2,3,4,5,6)) which was a bit better, would not work for my other table (Table2). – Marc Feb 17 '12 at 14:40

Here's a potential workaround to improve the query performance. From the context, it sounds like your query takes about a minute and a half to run.

Assuming you have a date_created column (or can add one), run a query in the background each day at midnight (say at 00:05am) and persist the value somewhere along with the last_updated date it was calculated (I'll come back to that in a bit).

Then, running against your date_created column (with an index), you can avoid a full table scan by doing a query like SELECT COUNT(*) FROM TABLE WHERE date_updated > "[TODAY] 00:00:05".

Add the count value from that query to your persisted value, and you have a reasonably fast count that's generally accurate.

The only catch is that from 12:05am to 12:07am (the duration during which your total count query is running) you have a race condition which you can check the last_updated value of your full table scan count(). If it's > 24 hours old, then your incremental count query needs to pull a full day's count plus time elapsed today. If it's < 24 hours old, then your incremental count query needs to pull a partial day's count (just time elapsed today).

  • Sorry for the late reply, i was sick a few days. SQLite is not an SQL server, it's a standalone database engine. So you can't schedule tasks, unless you use the windows (or other OS) scheduler. Anyway, only one connection at the time to a database is allowed, so while your scheduled count is running the database would be blocked for all other access. It's not a solution that would work for me. – Marc Feb 24 '12 at 13:42

I had the same problem, in my situation VACUUM command helped. After its execution on database COUNT(*) speed increased near 100 times. However, command itself needs some minutes in my database (20 millions records). I solved this problem by running VACUUM when my software exits after main window destruction, so the delay doesn't make problems to user.

  • 4
    VACUUM will force the whole file to be read and written, so it will fill the disk content into memory cache. That's why it is faster. If you reboot your PC, you will find it slow again, I suppose. – Arnaud Bouchez Jan 11 '13 at 10:09

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