202

In CSS, how can I do something like this:

width: 100% - 100px;

I guess this is fairly simple but it is a bit hard to find examples showing that.

2
  • 1
    The linked question stackoverflow.com/questions/11093943/… gives an interesting, but not fully backward compatible answer, maybe you would like to take a look on that too.
    – 11684
    Jun 19, 2012 at 19:23
  • 9
    For anyone who crosses this question Chad answered that modern browsers supports width: calc(100% - 100px); it's a few answers down and I hope the asker will update his question :) :)
    – Anders M.
    May 5, 2014 at 14:20

17 Answers 17

364

Modern browsers now support the:

width: calc(100% - 100px);

To see the list of supported browser versions checkout: Can I use calc() as CSS unit value?

There is a jQuery fallback: css width: calc(100% -100px); alternative using jquery

4
  • 15
    I found when I was using calc(100% - 6px) for example it was displaying as calc(94%), I had to escape it as follows and now it works width: calc(~"100% - 6px");
    – nsilva
    Apr 19, 2016 at 12:53
  • 26
    Be aware, you must have whitespace around the - (or +) character. This works: calc(100% - 100px); And this doesn't: calc(100%-100px);
    – freefaller
    Mar 24, 2017 at 16:19
  • I'm a little surprised there's no option to automatically subtract 2x the padding of the element, which would usually be a pretty common usecase. E.g., I end up having to do padding: 0.25em; width: calc(100% - 2 * 0.25em - 2em);, and would have to change the 0.25em in two places now if it has to be amended.
    – cnst
    Sep 8, 2019 at 22:23
  • So many thanks, would also like to note that it works for addition: (100% + 100px) Nov 14, 2019 at 10:28
100

Could you nest a div with margin-left: 50px; and margin-right: 50px; inside a <div> with width: 100%;?

1
  • 4
    width: calc(100% - 100px); this is correct answer instead.
    – Sushan
    Apr 20, 2017 at 6:45
21

You can try this...

<!--First Solution-->
width: calc(100% - 100px);
<!--Second Solution-->
width: calc(100vh - 100px);

vw: viewport width

vh: viewport height

2
  • First solution is correct, the container might not be the window and therefore 100vh might not equal 100% Mar 2, 2016 at 14:18
  • 2
    I found when I was using calc(100% - 6px) for example it was displaying as calc(94%), I had to escape it as follows and now it works width: calc(~"100% - 6px");
    – nsilva
    Apr 19, 2016 at 12:52
7

It started to work for me only when I checked all the spaces. So, it didn't work like this: width: calc(100%- 20px) or calc(100%-20px) and perfectly worked with width: calc(100% - 20px).

0
5

my code, and it works for IE6:

<style>
#container {margin:0 auto; width:100%;}
#header { height:100px; background:#9c6; margin-bottom:5px;}
#mainContent { height:500px; margin-bottom:5px;}
#sidebar { float:left; width:100px; height:500px; background:#cf9;}
#content { margin-left:100px; height:500px; background:#ffa;}

</style>

<div id="container">
  <div id="header">header</div>
  <div id="mainContent">
    <div id="sidebar">left</div>
    <div id="content">right 100% - 100px</div>
  <span style="display:none"></span></div>
</div>

enter image description here

1
  • 6
    What is that Javascript for?
    – Faiz
    Feb 13, 2014 at 4:52
4

You need to have a container for your content div that you wish to be 100% - 100px

#container {
   width: 100%
}
#content {
   margin-right:100px;
   width:100%;
}

<div id="container">
  <div id="content">
      Your content here
  </div>
</div>

You might need to add a clearing div just before the last </div> if your content div is overflowing.

<div style="clear:both; height:1px; line-height:0">&nbsp;</div>
1
2

Setting the body margins to 0, the width of the outer container to 100%, and using an inner container with 50px left/right margins seems to work.

<style>
body {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

.full-width
{
    width: 100%;
}

.innerContainer
{
    margin: 0px 50px 0px 50px;
}
</style>

<body>
  <div class="full-width" style="background-color: #ff0000;">
    <div class="innerContainer" style="background-color: #00ff00;">
      content here
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
2

Working with bootstrap panels, I was seeking how to place "delete" link in header panel, which would not be obscured by long neighbour element. And here is the solution:

html:

<div class="with-right-link">
    <a class="left-link" href="#">Long link header Long link header</a>
    <a class="right-link" href="#">Delete</a>
</div>

css:

.with-right-link { position: relative; width: 275px; }
a.left-link { display: inline-block; margin-right: 100px; }
a.right-link { position: absolute; top: 0; right: 0; }

Of course you can modify "top" and "right" values, according to your indentations. Source

1

Could you do:

margin-right: 50px;
margin-left: 50px;

Edit: My solution is wrong. The solution posted by Aric TenEyck suggesting using a div with width 100% and then nesting another div using the margins seems more correct.

7
  • 3
    If you do this, won't you end up with the total width being 100% + 100px?
    – Adam Crume
    May 22, 2009 at 17:58
  • :o( I'm sorry. Should I delete my post or should I leave it and let the down votes push it down? May 22, 2009 at 18:05
  • 1
    down votes are usually meant to encourage you to clean up your post so you can regain rep points lost by the negative votes. If you know your solution to be wrong you can delete if with or without down votes or update it to make it right.
    – aleemb
    May 22, 2009 at 18:14
  • @AdamCrume - Nope. That would only be the case if you also specified width:100%. A div will automatically fill the container unless you override that, eg, by explicitly specifying width, or by using float or absolute positioning. Adding a margin to a div will just cause it to fill its container, less the amount specified by the margin.
    – gilly3
    Jun 19, 2012 at 16:37
  • @aleemb - In this case the downvotes are by users who don't understand css as this answer is perfectly correct.
    – gilly3
    Jun 19, 2012 at 16:38
1

Padding on the outer div will get the desired effect.

<html>
<head>
<style>
    #outer{
        padding: 0 50px;
        border:1px solid black; /*for visualization*/
    }

    #inner{
        border:1px solid red; /*for visualization*/
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="outer">
    <div id="inner">
        100px smaller than outer
    </div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
1

There are 2 techniques which can come in handy for this common scenario. Each have their drawbacks but can both be useful at times.

box-sizing: border-box includes padding and border width in the width of an item. For example, if you set the width of a div with 20px 20px padding and 1px border to 100px, the actual width would be 142px but with border-box, both padding and margin are inside the 100px.

.bb{
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box; /* Safari/Chrome, other WebKit */
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;    /* Firefox, other Gecko */
    box-sizing: border-box;     
    width: 100%;
    height:200px;
    padding: 50px;
}

Here's an excellent article on it: http://css-tricks.com/box-sizing/ and here's a fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/L3Rvw/

And then there's position: absolute

.padded{
    position: absolute;
    top: 50px;
    right: 50px;
    left: 50px;
    bottom: 50px;
    background-color: #aefebc;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/Mw9CT/1/

Neither are perfect of course, box-sizing doesn't exactly fit the question as the element is actually 100% width, rather than 100% - 100px (however a child div would be). And absolute positioning definitely can't be used in every situation, but is usually okay as long as the parent height is set.

0

Are you using standards mode? This solution depends on it I think.

If you're trying to make 2 columns you could do something like this:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="left">
        sidebar
    </div>
    <div id="main">
        lorem ispsum etc... 
    </div>
</div>

Then use CSS to style it:

div#outer
{
    width:100%;
    height: 500px;
}

div#left
{
    width: 100px;
    height: 100%;
    float:left;
    background: green;
}

div#main
{
   width: auto;
   margin-left: 100px; /* same as div#left width */
   height: 100%;
   background:red;
}

If you don't want 2 columns you can probably remove <div id="left">

0
<div style="width: 200px; border: 1px solid red;">
    <br>
    <div style="margin: 0px 50px 0px 50px; border: 1px solid blue;">
        <br>
    </div>
    <br>
</div>
0

You can look into using LESS, which is a JavaScript file that pre-processes your CSS so you can include logic and variables into your CSS. So for your example, in LESS you would write width: 100% - 100px; to achieve exactly what you wanted :)

-1

CSS can not be used to animation, or any style modification on events.

The only way is to use a javascript function, which will return the width of a given element, then, subtract 100px to it, and set the new width size.

Assuming you are using jQuery, you could do something like that:

oldWidth = $('#yourElem').width();
$('#yourElem').width(oldWidth-100);

And with native javascript:

oldWidth = document.getElementById('yourElem').clientWidth;
document.getElementById('yourElem').style.width = oldWidth-100+'px';

We assume that you have a css style set with 100%;

0
-2

This works:

margin-right:100px;
width:auto;
3
  • 1
    Could you please add an explanation to your answer? Jan 22, 2016 at 16:44
  • I've tried: calc(100%-100px) and the results aren't consistent accross all platforms/browsers, then I tried to really simplify and used margin-right:100px; width:auto; and it worked... Jan 23, 2016 at 17:45
  • calc is CSS3 component and this css will work on those browsers which supports CSS3.
    – Sushan
    Apr 20, 2017 at 6:43
-3

You can't.

You can, however, use margins to effect the same result.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.