1742

Given a DateTime representing a person's birthday, how do I calculate their age in years?

locked by Yvette Colomb Apr 21 '18 at 17:49

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  • 127
    what all of the answers so far have missed is that it depends where the person was born and where they are right now. – Yaur May 21 '11 at 7:34
  • 37
    @Yaur: Just convert the time of now + birth into GMT/UTC, age is only a relative value, hence timezones are irrelevant. For determining the user's current timezone, you can use GeoLocating. – Stefan Steiger Oct 3 '11 at 10:20
  • Why not consider [Julian Date][1]? [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/7103064/… – Muhammad Hewedy Oct 5 '13 at 13:32
  • 4
    If we're taking into consideration @Yaur 's suggestion of cross-timezone calculations, should Day Light Saving Time affect the calculation in any manner? – DDM Jul 11 '15 at 3:42
  • No one has considered leap years? or checking the month? – Crash Override Jun 15 '17 at 10:06

63 Answers 63

7

This is simple and appears to be accurate for my needs. I am making an assumption for the purposes of leap years that regardless of when the person chooses to celebrate the birthday they are not technically a year older until a full 365 days has passed since there last birthday (i.e 28th February does not make them a year older)

DateTime now = DateTime.Today;
DateTime birthday = new DateTime(1991, 02, 03);//3rd feb

int age = now.Year - birthday.Year;

if (now.Month < birthday.Month || (now.Month == birthday.Month && now.Day < birthday.Day))//not had bday this year yet
  age--;

return age;

Let us know if you spot any problems ;)

7

I've made one small change to Mark Soen's answer: I've rewriten the third line so that the expression can be parsed a bit more easily.

public int AgeInYears(DateTime bday)
{
    DateTime now = DateTime.Today;
    int age = now.Year - bday.Year;            
    if (bday.AddYears(age) > now) 
        age--;
    return age;
}

I've also made it into a function for the sake of clarity.

6

Wow, I had to give my comment here.. There are so many answers for such a simple

private int CalcularIdade(DateTime dtNascimento)
    {
        var nHoje = Convert.ToInt32(DateTime.Today.ToString("yyyyMMdd"));
        var nAniversario = Convert.ToInt32(dtNascimento.ToString("yyyyMMdd"));

        double diff = (nHoje - nAniversario) / 10000;

        var ret = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Truncate(diff));

        return ret;
    }

Hope it can help someone, at least will make somebody think.. :)

5

This is the easiest way to answer this in a single line.

DateTime Dob = DateTime.Parse("1985-04-24");

int Age = DateTime.MinValue.AddDays(DateTime.Now.Subtract(Dob).TotalHours/24).Year - 1;

This also works for leap years.

  • 1
    your answer is wrong by one day, it will give the birthday a day before – Aman Dec 8 '16 at 14:13
5

=== Common Saying (from months to years old) ===

If you just for common use, here is the code as your information:

DateTime today = DateTime.Today;
DateTime bday = DateTime.Parse("2016-2-14");
int age = today.Year - bday.Year;
var unit = "";

if (bday > today.AddYears(-age))
{
    age--;
}
if (age == 0)   // Under one year old
{
    age = today.Month - bday.Month;

    age = age <= 0 ? (12 + age) : age;  // The next year before birthday

    age = today.Day - bday.Day >= 0 ? age : --age;  // Before the birthday.day

    unit = "month";
}
else {
    unit = "year";
}

if (age > 1)
{
    unit = unit + "s";
}

The test result as below:

The birthday: 2016-2-14

2016-2-15 =>  age=0, unit=month;
2016-5-13 =>  age=2, unit=months;
2016-5-14 =>  age=3, unit=months; 
2016-6-13 =>  age=3, unit=months; 
2016-6-15 =>  age=4, unit=months; 
2017-1-13 =>  age=10, unit=months; 
2017-1-14 =>  age=11, unit=months; 
2017-2-13 =>  age=11, unit=months; 
2017-2-14 =>  age=1, unit=year; 
2017-2-15 =>  age=1, unit=year; 
2017-3-13 =>  age=1, unit=year;
2018-1-13 =>  age=1, unit=year; 
2018-1-14 =>  age=1, unit=year; 
2018-2-13 =>  age=1, unit=year; 
2018-2-14 =>  age=2, unit=years; 
5
    private int GetYearDiff(DateTime start, DateTime end)
    {
        int diff = end.Year - start.Year;
        if (end.DayOfYear < start.DayOfYear) { diff -= 1; }
        return diff;
    }
    [Fact]
    public void GetYearDiff_WhenCalls_ShouldReturnCorrectYearDiff()
    {
        //arrange
        var now = DateTime.Now;
        //act
        //assert
        Assert.Equal(24, GetYearDiff(new DateTime(1992, 7, 9), now)); // passed
        Assert.Equal(24, GetYearDiff(new DateTime(1992, now.Month, now.Day), now)); // passed
        Assert.Equal(23, GetYearDiff(new DateTime(1992, 12, 9), now)); // passed
    }
5

Here's a DateTime extender that adds the age calculation to the DateTime object.

public static class AgeExtender
{
    public static int GetAge(this DateTime dt)
    {
        int d = int.Parse(dt.ToString("yyyyMMdd"));
        int t = int.Parse(DateTime.Today.ToString("yyyyMMdd"));
        return (t-d)/10000;
    }
}
  • 3
    ugh, don't do this. ToString and int.Parse are both relatively expensive and while i'm anti micro-optimization hiding expensive functions in extension methods that should be trivial operations is not a good idea. – Yaur May 21 '11 at 7:31
  • 1
    Also, this is a duplicate of ScArcher2's answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/9/… – David Schmitt May 30 '11 at 13:32
  • Yaur, I really like Elmer's solution that relies on DayOfYear, probably more efficient than mine. Note that my goal wasn't to change ScArcher2's algorithm, I felt that would be rude. It was simply to show how to implement an extension method. – B2K Sep 8 '11 at 22:23
4

I think the TimeSpan has all that we need in it, without having to resort to 365.25 (or any other approximation). Expanding on Aug's example:

DateTime myBD = new DateTime(1980, 10, 10);
TimeSpan difference = DateTime.Now.Subtract(myBD);

textBox1.Text = difference.Years + " years " + difference.Months + " Months " + difference.Days + " days";
  • 5
    Nope. TimeSpan as Days, but no Months or Years – James Curran Oct 3 '08 at 20:13
4

Why can't it be this simple?

int age = DateTime.Now.AddTicks(0 - dob.Ticks).Year - 1;
3

Here's a little code sample for C# I knocked up, be careful around the edge cases specifically leap years, not all the above solutions take them into account. Pushing the answer out as a DateTime can cause problems as you could end up trying to put too many days into a specific month e.g. 30 days in Feb.

public string LoopAge(DateTime myDOB, DateTime FutureDate)
{
    int years = 0;
    int months = 0;
    int days = 0;

    DateTime tmpMyDOB = new DateTime(myDOB.Year, myDOB.Month, 1);

    DateTime tmpFutureDate = new DateTime(FutureDate.Year, FutureDate.Month, 1);

    while (tmpMyDOB.AddYears(years).AddMonths(months) < tmpFutureDate)
    {
        months++;
        if (months > 12)
        {
            years++;
            months = months - 12;
        }
    }

    if (FutureDate.Day >= myDOB.Day)
    {
        days = days + FutureDate.Day - myDOB.Day;
    }
    else
    {
        months--;
        if (months < 0)
        {
            years--;
            months = months + 12;
        }
        days = days + (DateTime.DaysInMonth(FutureDate.AddMonths(-1).Year, FutureDate.AddMonths(-1).Month) + FutureDate.Day) - myDOB.Day;

    }

    //add an extra day if the dob is a leap day
    if (DateTime.IsLeapYear(myDOB.Year) && myDOB.Month == 2 && myDOB.Day == 29)
    {
        //but only if the future date is less than 1st March
        if(FutureDate >= new DateTime(FutureDate.Year, 3,1))
            days++;
    }

    return "Years: " + years + " Months: " + months + " Days: " + days;
}
  • 1
    I like this solution the best, however, when calculating the months, it needs to be if(months >= 12). Try 6-8-2012 - 6-4-1993 to test. – Jerry Jun 8 '12 at 19:43
3
public string GetAge(this DateTime birthdate, string ageStrinFormat = null)
{
    var date = DateTime.Now.AddMonths(-birthdate.Month).AddDays(-birthdate.Day);
    return string.Format(ageStrinFormat ?? "{0}/{1}/{2}",
        (date.Year - birthdate.Year), date.Month, date.Day);
}
3

Would this work?

public override bool IsValid(DateTime value)
{
    _dateOfBirth =  value;
    var yearsOld = (double) (DateTime.Now.Subtract(_dateOfBirth).TotalDays/365);
    if (yearsOld > 18)
        return true;
    return false; 
}
  • Negative rater please explain the reason!!! – azamsharp Dec 9 '09 at 2:32
  • 5
    Wow. Why is value an object rather than a DateTime? The method signature should be public override bool Is18OrOlder(DateTime birthday) What about people who were born on February 29? Who said that we were trying to check whether or not the user was at least 18 years old? The question was "how do I calculate someone's age?" – Chris Shouts May 4 '10 at 20:57
  • How did that happen? I don't even remember putting IsValid as object. It should be DateTime! – azamsharp May 5 '10 at 0:03
  • 1
    Instead of the if statement, why not use return yearsOld > 18; – T_Bacon Mar 28 '18 at 8:41
3

I want to add Hebrew calendar calculations (or other System.Globalization calendar can be used in the same way), using rewrited functions from this thread:

Public Shared Function CalculateAge(BirthDate As DateTime) As Integer
    Dim HebCal As New System.Globalization.HebrewCalendar ()
    Dim now = DateTime.Now()
    Dim iAge = HebCal.GetYear(now) - HebCal.GetYear(BirthDate)
    Dim iNowMonth = HebCal.GetMonth(now), iBirthMonth = HebCal.GetMonth(BirthDate)
    If iNowMonth < iBirthMonth Or (iNowMonth = iBirthMonth AndAlso HebCal.GetDayOfMonth(now) < HebCal.GetDayOfMonth(BirthDate)) Then iAge -= 1
    Return iAge
End Function
2

I've created an Age struct, which looks like this:

public struct Age : IEquatable<Age>, IComparable<Age>
{
    private readonly int _years;
    private readonly int _months;
    private readonly int _days;

    public int Years  { get { return _years; } }
    public int Months { get { return _months; } }
    public int Days { get { return _days; } }

    public Age( int years, int months, int days ) : this()
    {
        _years = years;
        _months = months;
        _days = days;
    }

    public static Age CalculateAge( DateTime dateOfBirth, DateTime date )
    {
        // Here is some logic that ressembles Mike's solution, although it
        // also takes into account months & days.
        // Ommitted for brevity.
        return new Age (years, months, days);
    }

    // Ommited Equality, Comparable, GetHashCode, functionality for brevity.
}
2

Try this solution, it's working.

int age = (Int32.Parse(DateTime.Today.ToString("yyyyMMdd")) - 
           Int32.Parse(birthday.ToString("yyyyMMdd rawrrr"))) / 10000;
2

Here is a function that is serving me well... No calcs, very simple.

    public static string ToAge(this DateTime dob, DateTime? toDate = null)
    {
        if (!toDate.HasValue)
            toDate = DateTime.Now;
        var now = toDate.Value;

        if (now.CompareTo(dob) < 0)
            return "Future date";

        int years = now.Year - dob.Year;
        int months = now.Month - dob.Month;
        int days = now.Day - dob.Day;

        if (days < 0)
        {
            months--;
            days = DateTime.DaysInMonth(dob.Year, dob.Month) - dob.Day + now.Day;
        }

        if (months < 0)
        {
            years--;
            months = 12 + months;
        }


        return string.Format("{0} year(s), {1} month(s), {2} days(s)",
            years,
            months,
            days);
    }

And here is a unit test:

    [Test]
    public void ToAgeTests()
    {
        var date = new DateTime(2000, 1, 1);
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 0 month(s), 1 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 12, 31).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 0 month(s), 0 days(s)", new DateTime(2000, 1, 1).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("1 year(s), 0 month(s), 0 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 1, 1).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 11 month(s), 0 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 2, 1).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 10 month(s), 25 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 2, 4).ToAge(date));
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 10 month(s), 1 days(s)", new DateTime(1999, 2, 28).ToAge(date));

        date = new DateTime(2000, 2, 15);
        Assert.AreEqual("0 year(s), 0 month(s), 28 days(s)", new DateTime(2000, 1, 18).ToAge(date));
    }
2

I have used for this issue, I know, it's not very elegant, but it's working

DateTime zeroTime = new DateTime(1, 1, 1);
var date1 = new DateTime(1983, 03, 04);
var date2 = DateTime.Now;
var dif = date2 - date1;
int years = (zeroTime + dif).Year - 1;
Log.DebugFormat("Years -->{0}", years);
2

I often count on my fingers. I need to look a calendar to work out when things change. So that's what I'd do in my code:

int AgeNow(DateTime birthday)
{
    return AgeAt(DateTime.Now, birthday);
}

int AgeAt(DateTime now, DateTime birthday)
{
    return AgeAt(now, birthday, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.Calendar);
}

int AgeAt(DateTime now, DateTime birthday, Calendar calendar)
{
    // My age has increased on the morning of my 
    // birthday even though I was born in the evening.
    now = now.Date;
    birthday = birthday.Date;

    var age = 0;
    if (now <= birthday) return age; // I am zero now if I am to be born tomorrow.

    while (calendar.AddYears(birthday, age + 1) <= now)
    {
        age++;
    }
    return age;
}

Running this through in LinqPad gives this:

PASSED: someone born on 28 February 1964 is age 4 on 28 February 1968
PASSED: someone born on 29 February 1964 is age 3 on 28 February 1968
PASSED: someone born on 31 December 2016 is age 0 on 01 January 2017

Code in LinqPad is here

2

Just use:

(DateTime.Now - myDate).TotalHours / 8766.0

the current date - myDate = TimeSpan, get total hours and divide in the total hours per year and get exacly the age/months/days...

2
var birthDate = ... // DOB
var resultDate = DateTime.Now - birthDate;

Using resultDate you can apply TimeSpan properties whatever you want to display it.

1

Here is a very simple and easy to follow example.

private int CalculateAge()
{
//get birthdate
   DateTime dtBirth = Convert.ToDateTime(BirthDatePicker.Value);
   int byear = dtBirth.Year;
   int bmonth = dtBirth.Month;
   int bday = dtBirth.Day;
   DateTime dtToday = DateTime.Now;
   int tYear = dtToday.Year;
   int tmonth = dtToday.Month;
   int tday = dtToday.Day;
   int age = tYear - byear;
   if (bmonth < tmonth)
       age--;
   else if (bmonth == tmonth && bday>tday)
   {
       age--;
   }
return age;
}
1

With less conversions and UtcNow, this code can take care of someone born on the Feb 29 on a leap year:

public int GetAge(DateTime DateOfBirth)
{
    var Now = DateTime.UtcNow;
    return Now.Year - DateOfBirth.Year -
        (
            (
                Now.Month > DateOfBirth.Month ||
                (Now.Month == DateOfBirth.Month && Now.Day >= DateOfBirth.Day)
            ) ? 0 : 1
        );
}
1

How come the MSDN help did not tell you that? It looks so obvious:

System.DateTime birthTime = AskTheUser(myUser); // :-)
System.DateTime now = System.DateTime.Now;
System.TimeSpan age = now - birthTime; //as simple as that
double ageInDays = age.TotalDays; // will you convert to whatever you want yourself?
  • 6
    Well, that's fantastic, if you're in one of the zero countries on Earth where ages of adult human beings are measured in days. – Casey Oct 14 '14 at 20:47
1

Just because I don't think the top answer is that clear:

public static int GetAgeByLoop(DateTime birthday)
{
    var age = -1;

    for (var date = birthday; date < DateTime.Today; date = date.AddYears(1))
        age++;

    return age;
}
1

I would simply do this:

DateTime birthDay = new DateTime(1990, 05, 23);
DateTime age = DateTime.Now - birthDay;

This way you can calculate the exact age of a person, down to the millisecond if you want.

  • 1
    It's wrong. In your code age would be a TimeSpan. Not DateTime. – Edward Olamisan Oct 2 '15 at 16:57
  • The problem with this is that an age like “17 years” doesn't translate directly to a TimeSpan because you don't know which of those 17 years were leap years. – Arturo Torres Sánchez Oct 6 '15 at 15:17
1

Simple Code

 var birthYear=1993;
 var age = DateTime.Now.AddYears(-birthYear).Year;
1

Here is the simplest way to calculate someone's age.
Calculating someone's age is pretty straightforward, and here's how! In order for the code to work, you need a DateTime object called BirthDate containing the birthday.

 C#
        // get the difference in years
        int years = DateTime.Now.Year - BirthDate.Year; 
        // subtract another year if we're before the
        // birth day in the current year
        if (DateTime.Now.Month < BirthDate.Month || 
            (DateTime.Now.Month == BirthDate.Month && 
            DateTime.Now.Day < BirthDate.Day)) 
            years--;
  VB.NET
        ' get the difference in years
        Dim years As Integer = DateTime.Now.Year - BirthDate.Year
        ' subtract another year if we're before the
        ' birth day in the current year
        If DateTime.Now.Month < BirthDate.Month Or (DateTime.Now.Month = BirthDate.Month And DateTime.Now.Day < BirthDate.Day) Then 
            years = years - 1
        End If
  • 4
    "Here is the simplest way to calculate someone's age." That's really not the simplest way. Using Noda Time, it's just int years = Period.Between(birthDate, today).Years;. – Jon Skeet Feb 8 '18 at 15:13
  • 1
    @JonSkeet To be fair, Noda Time is not part of any .Net standard. Given that, this is one of the simplest way to calculate the age of a person, in years. – Clearer Apr 23 '18 at 9:42
0

To calculate how many years old a person is,

DateTime dateOfBirth;

int ageInYears = DateTime.Now.Year - dateOfBirth.Year;

if (dateOfBirth > today.AddYears(-ageInYears )) ageInYears --;
  • 1
    This would mean that someone born on December 31st in 2000 turned 18 on January 1st 2018! 2018-2000 = 18 – Tobias Jun 26 '18 at 6:32
  • Thanks for reminding me I have updated my answer now, at that time I am forgetting to add the last line. So Thank you for correcting me. :) – Kaval Patel Jul 25 '18 at 12:01
  • you just copied first answer, what gives Patel? – sensei Jun 10 at 18:45
-1

A one Linear Answer,

    DateTime dateOfBirth = Convert.ToDateTime("01/16/1990");
    var age = ((DateTime.Now - dateOfBirth).Days) / 365;
-2

Check this out:

TimeSpan ts = DateTime.Now.Subtract(Birthdate);
age = (byte)(ts.TotalDays / 365.25);

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