I am builing my numpy/scipy environment based on blas and lapack more or less based on this walk through.

When I am done, how can I check, that my numpy/scipy functions really do use the previously built blas/lapack functionalities?

  • 2
    I noticed you're still active on Stack Overflow. Looking at the accepted and the top voted answers, I suggest that you consider marking the top voted answer as accepted instead of the currently accepted one:) – Andras Deak Jun 13 '17 at 15:50
up vote 26 down vote accepted

What you are searching for is this: system info

I compiled numpy/scipy with atlas and i can check this with:

import numpy.distutils.system_info as sysinfo
sysinfo.get_info('atlas')

Check the documentation for more commands.

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    This doesn't seem to show whether numpy currently uses ATLAS, just whether ATLAS will be linked against during the next numpy compilation. I had numpy compiled before ATLAS. It worked very slow until I recompiled numpy (sure thing), but both before and after numpy recompilation sysinfo.get_info('atlas') shown the same output. How to check the current state of affairs? – dmytro Jan 19 '13 at 15:05
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    How to interpret the output? – Eric Lebigot Nov 8 '13 at 11:50
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    You might have 'blas' instead of 'atlas' installed (this happens if you install openblas on debian based distros). – Malcolm Nov 19 '13 at 19:24
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    davost's answer should probably have been accepted in lieu of this response, which fails to address the question at hand. Since this response does uncover interesting machinery of use in solving other related questions, a hearty thanks all the same! – Cecil Curry Feb 5 '16 at 5:44
  • @rabra sysinfo.get_info('atlas') returned nothing for me but sysinfo.get_info('blas') returned {'include_dirs': ['/usr/local/include', '/usr/include', '/opt/local/include', '/usr/local/Cellar/python/2.7.13/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/include'], 'libraries': ['blas', 'blas'], 'library_dirs': ['/usr/lib']} and sysinfo.get_info('lapack') returned {'language': 'f77', 'libraries': ['lapack', 'lapack'], 'library_dirs': ['/usr/lib']} What does it mean ? – SebMa Jun 26 '17 at 16:59

The method numpy.__config__.show() outputs information about linkage gathered at build time. My output looks like this. I think it means I am using the BLAS/LAPACK that ships with Mac OS.

>>>import numpy as np
>>>np.__config__.show()

lapack_opt_info:
    extra_link_args = ['-Wl,-framework', '-Wl,Accelerate']
    extra_compile_args = ['-msse3']
    define_macros = [('NO_ATLAS_INFO', 3)]
blas_opt_info:
    extra_link_args = ['-Wl,-framework', '-Wl,Accelerate']
    extra_compile_args = ['-msse3', '-I/System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Headers']
    define_macros = [('NO_ATLAS_INFO', 3)]
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    this should be the accepted answer – Julius Jul 31 '15 at 19:19
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    Given its widespread usefulness, numpy.__config__ should really be a public API. Nonetheless, you win this round, davost. – Cecil Curry Feb 5 '16 at 5:51
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    How do you interpret the output? – Edward Newell Apr 30 '16 at 17:21
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    @CecilCurry You can use numpy.show_config(), which is probably a public API function by virtue of the absence of starting underscores. But it's not documented online and has no docstring, so it's no surprise that it's so hard to find. Hopefully they'll fix that. – Praveen Feb 23 '17 at 5:17
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    how do I find out which package is actually used when multiple packages are displayed? – Jonasson Mar 9 '17 at 12:53

As it uses the dynamically loaded versions, you can just do this:

$ ldd anyoftheCmodules.so

where anyoftheCmodules.so could be, for example, numpy/core/_dotblas.so, which links to libblas.so.

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    What if there is no file numpy/core/_dotblas.so ? (see comment below talonmies answer) – Woltan Jan 25 '12 at 12:12
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    There must but a number of .so files in there. Just search inside the NumPy directory (say, using find /path/to/numpy -name "*.so"). A couple of those (_dotblas.so, lapack_lite.so under Ubuntu's precompiled one, for example) make use of BLAS/LAPACK – Ricardo Cárdenes Jan 25 '12 at 12:18
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    _dotblas.so no longer exists in numpy v1.10 and newer, but you can check the linkage of multiarray.so instead – ali_m Oct 14 '15 at 22:11
  • It should be mentioned that this solution is both Linux-specific and fragile. You really, really just want to access the canonical numpy.__config__ object at runtime instead. (See davost's excellent answer.) – Cecil Curry Feb 5 '16 at 5:55
  • It is, indeed, Linux-specific, and I agree that @davost method is better. I don't get why my answer keeps getting upvoted. – Ricardo Cárdenes Feb 5 '16 at 7:12

You can use the link loader dependency tool to look at the C level hook components of your build and see whether they have external dependencies on your blas and lapack of choice. I am not near a linux box right now, but on an OS X machine you can do this inside the site-packages directory which holds the installations:

$ otool -L numpy/core/_dotblas.so 
numpy/core/_dotblas.so:
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 125.2.0)
    /System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Versions/A/vecLib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 268.0.1)

$ otool -L scipy/linalg/flapack.so 
scipy/linalg/flapack.so (architecture i386):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)
    /System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Versions/A/vecLib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 242.0.0)
scipy/linalg/flapack.so (architecture ppc):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)

$ otool -L scipy/linalg/fblas.so 
scipy/linalg/fblas.so (architecture i386):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)
    /System/Library/Frameworks/vecLib.framework/Versions/A/vecLib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 242.0.0)
scipy/linalg/fblas.so (architecture ppc):
    /System/Library/Frameworks/Accelerate.framework/Versions/A/Accelerate (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 4.0.0)
    /usr/local/lib/libgcc_s.1.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 1.0.0)
    /usr/lib/libSystem.B.dylib (compatibility version 1.0.0, current version 111.1.4)

substitute ldd in place of otool on a gnu/Linux system and you should get the answers you need.

  • 1
    What if there is no file numpy/core/_dotblas.so ? (see comment below Ricardos answer) – Woltan Jan 25 '12 at 12:13
  • @Woltan: either something is seriously broken, or you are looking in the wrong place. On every Linux and OS X numpy install I have ever seen, there will be a _dotblas.so which is the interface wrapper to whatever blas has been used to build the distribution. On windows it will be called _dotblas.pyd, but the function is the same. – talonmies Jan 25 '12 at 12:18
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    It seems like _dotblas.so is only built if you're using a [atlas] section in site.cfg (and a CBLAS-enabled BLAS library). So, you should use that, even if you're not using ATLAS (except when you're using Intel MKL, that has a dedicated section). – Kenneth Hoste May 10 '13 at 18:44
  • Indeed, when no BLAS is available when NumPy is built, it builds its own dot-product routines. These can be two orders of magnitude slower than ATLAS. – Fred Foo Sep 1 '13 at 12:33
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    _dotblas.so no longer exists in numpy v1.10 and newer, but you can check the linkage of multiarray.so instead – ali_m Oct 14 '15 at 22:11

You can display BLAS, LAPACK, MKL linkage using show_config():

import numpy as np
np.show_config()

Which for me gives output:

mkl_info: libraries = ['mkl_rt', 'pthread'] library_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/lib'] define_macros = [('SCIPY_MKL_H', None), ('HAVE_CBLAS', None)] include_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/include'] blas_mkl_info: libraries = ['mkl_rt', 'pthread'] library_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/lib'] define_macros = [('SCIPY_MKL_H', None), ('HAVE_CBLAS', None)] include_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/include'] blas_opt_info: libraries = ['mkl_rt', 'pthread'] library_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/lib'] define_macros = [('SCIPY_MKL_H', None), ('HAVE_CBLAS', None)] include_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/include'] lapack_mkl_info: libraries = ['mkl_rt', 'pthread'] library_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/lib'] define_macros = [('SCIPY_MKL_H', None), ('HAVE_CBLAS', None)] include_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/include'] lapack_opt_info: libraries = ['mkl_rt', 'pthread'] library_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/lib'] define_macros = [('SCIPY_MKL_H', None), ('HAVE_CBLAS', None)] include_dirs = ['/my/environment/path/include']

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