9

Maybe a bad title, but this is my problem: I'm building a framework to learn more about javascript. And I want to use ""jQuery"" style.

How can I make a function where the () is optional?

$("p").fadeOut(); //() is there
$.each(arr, function(k, v) {...}); //Dropped the (), but HOW?

This is what I have come up with, but it don't work:

$2DC = function(selector)
{
    return new function() {
        return {
            circle : function()
            {
                //...
            }
        }
    }
}


$2DC("#id1"); //Work
$2DC("#id2").circle(); //Work
$2DC.circle(); //DONT WORK
3

7 Answers 7

23

$ is really just an alias for the jQuery function. You can call the function with:

jQuery("p"); or $("p");

but remember, in JavaScript you can attach "stuff" directly to functions.

function foo(){
}
foo.blah = "hi";
foo.func = function() { alert("hi"); };

foo.func(); //alerts "hi"

This is how (conceptually) jQuery's each function is defined.

jQuery.each = function(someArr, callback) { ...

And so now jQuery.each is a function that can be called like this:

jQuery.each([1, 2, 3], function(i, val) {
});

or the more familiar

$.each([1, 2, 3], function(i, val) {
});

So for your particular case, to support:

$2DC.circle(); 

You'd have to add the circle function directly to $2DC:

$2DC.circle = function(){
   // code
};
2
  • Thanks! :) That was really easy... I learn a lot by building a framework.
    – Sawny
    Jan 25, 2012 at 17:27
  • @Sawny - sure thing. JavaScript is a lot of fun Jan 25, 2012 at 17:29
6

Functions are objects in JavaScript. As such, they can be used as variables, just like ints, strings, etc.

In your example, $2DC is a function that returns an object containing a circle function.

$2DC.circle(); doesn't work as circle is only a property of the returned object, not of $2DC itself.

In the case of $.each, this works as $ contains an each property. Your $2DC can do that too. Like this:

$2DC.circle = function(){
}

Now, $2DC.circle(); will work. So, as you see functions are objects, and as such can have properties just like other objects.

2
  • +1, even though you beat me out of an enlightened badge by 4 seconds :-) Jan 25, 2012 at 17:31
  • 1
    @AdamRackis: I'm an answer ninja ^_^ Jan 25, 2012 at 17:48
1
$2DC.circle(); //DONT WORK

This didn't work because $2DC do not have any function with name circle. It is just a function.

Where as $2DC("#id2") returns a new function containing object having circle function so $2DC("#id2").circle(); works fine for you.

If you define

$2DC.circle = function(){

};

You can use $2DC.circle();

0

Create your base function, then add methods to the function.

var f = function(text){
    alert(text);
}
f.fn1 = function(text){
    alert('fn:'+text);
}
f.fn2 = function(text){
    alert('fn2:'+text);
}

f('hi'); //hi;
f.fn1('hi'); //fn:hi;
f.fn2('hi'); //fn2:hi;
0

The $.each method that you refer to is a property on the $ function object.

The $ object in jQuery is a function object and like any object in JavaScript, you can assign properties on the object.

Invoking the $ function object acts as a constructor function and returns a new object instance created by the jQuery.fn.init() function. The prototype of jQuery is copied to jQuery.fn.init so that newly created object instances have access to the methods and plugins defined on jQuery.

0

It can be achieved using something like this.

$.fn.each = function (otherparams);

$.each = function (collection, otherparams) {
  return $.fn.each.apply(collection, arguments.slice(1));
};

Adding each as a property of fn (which is just an alias for jQuery.prototype) means it's available as a method of each jQuery collection. The second bit of code means it can be passed in a collection as an argument instead.

apply (and call) are some of the most useful features of javascript once you get used to them.

-1

Try it like this:

$2DC = (function(selector)
{
    return new function() {
        return {
            circle : function()
            {
                //...
            }
        }
    }
})();

this way the $2DC is the object returned by the function and not the function itself.

7
  • to the guy who voted me down, you must be a real genius: jsfiddle.net/andrepadez/Pdvju Jan 25, 2012 at 17:20
  • In this case $2DC is no longer a function, it's just a normal object. $2DC("#id1"); no longer works. This is not what the OP wanted. I down-voted you because of that, and because you didn't explain the code in your answer. Jan 25, 2012 at 17:23
  • It's an object, that returns functions, just like jQuery! try the fiddle then Jan 25, 2012 at 17:24
  • 1
    jQuery is a function (which is an object). It can be called like this: jQuery('p'). In your answer, $2DC is just a normal object (not a function), so $2DC('p') does not work. Jan 25, 2012 at 17:25
  • var jQuery = (function() { ... })( window ); this is the source of jQuery, want to argue some more? Jan 25, 2012 at 17:38

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