10

I have a collection of about a hundred or so sorted vector<int>'s Although most vectors have a small number of integers in them, some of the vectors contain a large (>10K) of them (thus the vectors don't necessarily have the same size).

What I'd like to do essentially iterate through smallest to largest integer, that are contained in all these sorted vectors.

One way to do it would be to merge all these sorted vectors into a sorted vector & simply iterate. Thus,

Question 1: What is the fastest way to merge sorted vectors into a sorted vector?

I'm sure on the other hand there are faster / clever ways to accomplish this without merging & re-sorting the whole thing -- perhaps popping the smallest integer iteratively from this collection of sorted vectors; without merging them first.. so:

Question 2: What is the fasted / best way to pop the least element from a bunch of sorted vector<int>'s?


Based on replies below, and the comments to the question I've implemented an approach where I make a priority queue of iterators for the sorted vectors. I'm not sure if this is performance-efficient, but it seems to be very memory-efficient. I consider the question still open, since I'm not sure we've established the fastest way yet.

// compare vector pointers by integers pointed
struct cmp_seeds {
    bool operator () (const pair< vector<int>::iterator, vector<int>::iterator> p1, const pair< vector<int>::iterator, vector<int>::iterator> p2) const {
        return *(p1.first) >  *(p2.first);      
    }
};

int pq_heapsort_trial() {

    /* Set up the Sorted Vectors */ 
    int a1[] = { 2, 10, 100};
    int a2[] = { 5, 15, 90, 200};
    int a3[] = { 12 };

    vector<int> v1 (a1, a1 + sizeof(a1) / sizeof(int));
    vector<int> v2 (a2, a2 + sizeof(a2) / sizeof(int));
    vector<int> v3 (a3, a3 + sizeof(a3) / sizeof(int));

    vector< vector <int> * > sorted_vectors;
    sorted_vectors.push_back(&v1);
    sorted_vectors.push_back(&v2);
    sorted_vectors.push_back(&v3);
    /* the above simulates the "for" i have in my own code that gives me sorted vectors */

    pair< vector<int>::iterator, vector<int>::iterator> c_lead;
    cmp_seeds mycompare;

    priority_queue< pair< vector<int>::iterator, vector<int>::iterator>, vector<pair< vector<int>::iterator, vector<int>::iterator> >, cmp_seeds> cluster_feeder(mycompare);


    for (vector<vector <int> *>::iterator k = sorted_vectors.begin(); k != sorted_vectors.end(); ++k) {
        cluster_feeder.push( make_pair( (*k)->begin(), (*k)->end() ));
    }


    while ( cluster_feeder.empty() != true) {
        c_lead = cluster_feeder.top();
        cluster_feeder.pop();
        // sorted output
        cout << *(c_lead.first) << endl;

        c_lead.first++;
        if (c_lead.first != c_lead.second) {
            cluster_feeder.push(c_lead);
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
6
  • 1
    1) If space isn't an issue, perform the standard merge of sorted ranges from your CS101 into a new vector (or just think about it for a minute and do the obvious thing). 2) Before you go around popping stuff, make sure you understand the complexity guarantees of standard containers; modifying a std::vector is in general fairly expensive. 3) Stop ab'using t'he apo'strophes!
    – Kerrek SB
    Commented Jan 26, 2012 at 3:05
  • @Kerrek-SB Thanks, fixed the formatting a bit -- I'm fairly happy simply merging the vectors into a bigger vector & sorting; but I'm wondering if there are faster ways to do it.
    – Deniz
    Commented Jan 26, 2012 at 3:11
  • No no, you perform a sorted merge. Think about it, there's an obvious way to exploit the ordering of the input ranges to create an already ordered output range.
    – Kerrek SB
    Commented Jan 26, 2012 at 3:15
  • @Kerrek-SB I think I see what you mean, I know how to use the regular merge function for two sorted vectors; does this work well recursively / iteratively? How to do a "multi-merge" of more than 2 sorted vectors?
    – Deniz
    Commented Jan 26, 2012 at 3:20
  • 2
    Use a priority queue (heap) that stores first elements of the vectors. Commented Jan 26, 2012 at 3:28

3 Answers 3

4

One option is to use a std :: priority queue to maintain a heap of iterators, where the iterators bubble up the heap depending on the values they point at.

You could also consider using repeating applications of std :: inplace_merge. This would involve appending all the data together into a big vector and remembering the offsets at which each distinct sorted block begins and ends, and then passing those into inplace_merge. This would probably be faster then the heap solution, although I think fundamentally the complexity is equivalent.

Update: I've implemented the second algorithm I just described. Repeatedly doing a mergesort in place. This code is on ideone.

This works by first concatenating all the sorted lists together into one long list. If there were three source lists, this means there are four 'offsets', which are four points in the full list between which the elements are sorted. The algorithm will then pull off three of these at a time, merging the two corresponding adjacent sorted lists into one sorted list, and then remembering two of those three offsets to be used in the new_offsets.

This repeats in a loop, with pairs of adjacent sorted ranges merged together, until only one sorted range remains.

Ultimately, I think the best algorithm would involve merging the shortest pairs of adjacent ranges together first.

// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9013485/c-how-to-merge-sorted-vectors-into-a-sorted-vector-pop-the-least-element-fro/9048857#9048857
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cassert>
using namespace std;

template<typename T, size_t N>
vector<T> array_to_vector( T(*array)[N] ) { // Yes, this works. By passing in the *address* of
                                            // the array, all the type information, including the
                                            // length of the array, is known at compiler. 
        vector<T> v( *array, &((*array)[N]));
        return v;
}   

void merge_sort_many_vectors() {

    /* Set up the Sorted Vectors */ 
    int a1[] = { 2, 10, 100};
    int a2[] = { 5, 15, 90, 200};
    int a3[] = { 12 };

    vector<int> v1  = array_to_vector(&a1);
    vector<int> v2  = array_to_vector(&a2);
    vector<int> v3  = array_to_vector(&a3);


    vector<int> full_vector;
    vector<size_t> offsets;
    offsets.push_back(0);

    full_vector.insert(full_vector.end(), v1.begin(), v1.end());
    offsets.push_back(full_vector.size());
    full_vector.insert(full_vector.end(), v2.begin(), v2.end());
    offsets.push_back(full_vector.size());
    full_vector.insert(full_vector.end(), v3.begin(), v3.end());
    offsets.push_back(full_vector.size());

    assert(full_vector.size() == v1.size() + v2.size() + v3.size());

    cout << "before:\t";
    for(vector<int>::const_iterator v = full_vector.begin(); v != full_vector.end(); ++v) {
            cout << ", " << *v;
    }       
    cout << endl;
    while(offsets.size()>2) {
            assert(offsets.back() == full_vector.size());
            assert(offsets.front() == 0);
            vector<size_t> new_offsets;
            size_t x = 0;
            while(x+2 < offsets.size()) {
                    // mergesort (offsets[x],offsets[x+1]) and (offsets[x+1],offsets[x+2])
                    inplace_merge(&full_vector.at(offsets.at(x))
                                 ,&full_vector.at(offsets.at(x+1))
                                 ,&(full_vector[offsets.at(x+2)]) // this *might* be at the end
                                 );
                    // now they are sorted, we just put offsets[x] and offsets[x+2] into the new offsets.
                    // offsets[x+1] is not relevant any more
                    new_offsets.push_back(offsets.at(x));
                    new_offsets.push_back(offsets.at(x+2));
                    x += 2;
            }
            // if the number of offsets was odd, there might be a dangling offset
            // which we must remember to include in the new_offsets
            if(x+2==offsets.size()) {
                    new_offsets.push_back(offsets.at(x+1));
            }
            // assert(new_offsets.front() == 0);
            assert(new_offsets.back() == full_vector.size());
            offsets.swap(new_offsets);

    }
    cout << "after: \t";
    for(vector<int>::const_iterator v = full_vector.begin(); v != full_vector.end(); ++v) {
            cout << ", " << *v;
    }
    cout << endl;
}

int main() {
        merge_sort_many_vectors();
}
4
  • thanks Aaron, implemented the first suggestion and posted code -- any suggestions? If i get around to doing the inplace_merge will update again.
    – Deniz
    Commented Jan 28, 2012 at 22:05
  • @Deniz, your priority_queue algorithm looks good. I've now updated my answer here to include an implementation of my second algorithm, where pairs of adjacent sorted ranges are repeatedly merge-sorted together until only one range remains. Commented Jan 29, 2012 at 0:42
  • @AaronMcDaid I tried the above program with different inputs and the results were not in sorted order. Input: int a1[] = { 30, 50, 3, 8}; int a2[] = { 11, 14, 19, 6, 8, 30}; int a3[] = { 8, 6 }; Output: 11, 14, 19, 6, 8, 30, 30, 50, 3, 8, 6, 8
    – SyncMaster
    Commented Jul 27, 2012 at 16:07
  • @SyncMaster, the question assumes that the input vectors are already sorted. But each vector that you have supplied is not already sorted. So I think my program is still correct for the question. If the goal simply was to merge a number of unsorted vectors, then the solution is simply to concatenate the vectors and then run a standard std::sort on it. But the goal here is to use the fact that the inputs are already sorted, and use this fact to get a faster sorting. Commented Jul 27, 2012 at 20:02
2

The first thing that springs to mind is to make a heap structure containing iterators to each vector, ordered by the value they currently point at. (each entry would need to contain the end iterator too, of course)

The current element is at the root of the heap, and to advance, you simply either pop it, or increase its key. (the latter could be done by popping, incrementing, then pushing)

I believe this should have asymptotic complexity O(E log M) where E is the total number of elements, and M is the number of vectors.

If you are really popping everything out of the vectors, you could make a heap of pointers to your vectors, you may want to treat them as heaps too, to avoid the performance penalty of erasing from the front of a vector. (or, you could copy everything into deques first)


Merging them all together by merging pairs at a time has the same asymptotic complexity if you're careful about the order. If you arrange all of the vectors in a full, balanced binary tree then pairwise merge as you go up the tree, then each element will be copied log M times, also leading to an O(E log M) algorithm.

For extra actual efficiency, instead of the tree, you should repeatedly merge the smallest two vectors until you only have one left. (again, putting pointers to the vectors in a heap is the way to go, but this time ordered by length)

(really, you want to order by "cost to copy" instead of length. An extra thing to optimize for certain value types)


If I had to guess, the fastest way would be to use the second idea, but with an N-ary merge instead of a pairwise merge, for some suitable N (which I'm guessing will be either a small constant, or roughly the square-root of the number of vectors), and perform the N-ary merge by using the first algorithm above to enumerate the contents of N vectors at once.

2
  • Of course, for specialized data, you might be better off doing a linear-time sort; e.g. a histogram or a bucket sort or a radix sort.
    – user1084944
    Commented Jan 26, 2012 at 4:08
  • Thank you for your answer, I'm relatively new, could you provide some example code for illustration purposes? (1) How does one do an N-ary merge? (2) How does " heap structure containing iterators to each vector, ordered by the value they currently point at. (each entry would need to contain the end iterator too, of course) The current element is at the root of the heap, and to advance, you simply either pop it, or increase its key. (the latter could be done by popping, incrementing, then pushing)" look in code?
    – Deniz
    Commented Jan 26, 2012 at 20:31
0

I've used the algorithm given here and did a little abstracting; converting to templates. I've coded this version in VS2010 and used a lambda function instead of the functor. I don't know if this is in any sense 'better' than the previous version, but maybe it will be useful someone?

#include <queue>
#include <vector>

namespace priority_queue_sort
{
    using std::priority_queue;
    using std::pair;
    using std::make_pair;
    using std::vector;

    template<typename T>
    void value_vectors(const vector< vector <T> * >& input_sorted_vectors, vector<T> &output_vector)
    {
        typedef vector<T>::iterator iter;
        typedef pair<iter, iter>    iter_pair;

        static auto greater_than_lambda = [](const iter_pair& p1, const iter_pair& p2) -> bool { return *(p1.first) >  *(p2.first); };

        priority_queue<iter_pair, std::vector<iter_pair>, decltype(greater_than_lambda) > cluster_feeder(greater_than_lambda);

        size_t total_size(0);

        for (auto k = input_sorted_vectors.begin(); k != input_sorted_vectors.end(); ++k)
        {
            cluster_feeder.push( make_pair( (*k)->begin(), (*k)->end() ) );
            total_size += (*k)->size();
        }

        output_vector.resize(total_size);
        total_size = 0;
        iter_pair c_lead;
        while (cluster_feeder.empty() != true)
        {
            c_lead = cluster_feeder.top();
            cluster_feeder.pop();
            output_vector[total_size++] = *(c_lead.first);
            c_lead.first++;
            if (c_lead.first != c_lead.second) cluster_feeder.push(c_lead);
        }
    }

    template<typename U, typename V>
    void pair_vectors(const vector< vector < pair<U, V> > * >& input_sorted_vectors, vector< pair<U, V> > &output_vector)
    {
        typedef vector< pair<U, V> >::iterator iter;
        typedef pair<iter, iter> iter_pair;

        static auto greater_than_lambda = [](const iter_pair& p1, const iter_pair& p2) -> bool { return *(p1.first) >  *(p2.first); };

        priority_queue<iter_pair, std::vector<iter_pair>, decltype(greater_than_lambda) > cluster_feeder(greater_than_lambda);

        size_t total_size(0);

        for (auto k = input_sorted_vectors.begin(); k != input_sorted_vectors.end(); ++k)
        {
            cluster_feeder.push( make_pair( (*k)->begin(), (*k)->end() ) );
            total_size += (*k)->size();
        }

        output_vector.resize(total_size);
        total_size = 0;
        iter_pair c_lead;

        while (cluster_feeder.empty() != true)
        {
            c_lead = cluster_feeder.top();
            cluster_feeder.pop();
            output_vector[total_size++] = *(c_lead.first);  
            c_lead.first++;
            if (c_lead.first != c_lead.second) cluster_feeder.push(c_lead);
        }
    }
}

The algorithm priority_queue_sort::value_vectors sorts vectors containing values only; whereas priority_queue_sort::pair_vectors sorts vectors containing pairs of data according to the first data-element. Hope someone can use this someday :-)

1
  • this has a bug when one of the input sorted vectors is empty. you can just check for this upfront before adding to cluster_feeder Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 0:14

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