I'm using this (simplified) chunk of code to extract a set of tables from SQL Server with bcp.

$OutputDirectory = "c:\junk\"
$ServerOption =   "-SServerName"
$TargetDatabase = "Content.dbo."

$ExtractTables = @(
    "Page"
    , "ChecklistItemCategory"
    , "ChecklistItem"
    )

for ($i=0; $i -le $ExtractTables.Length – 1; $i++)  {
    $InputFullTableName = "$TargetDatabase$($ExtractTables[$i])"
    $OutputFullFileName = "$OutputDirectory$($ExtractTables[$i])"
    bcp $InputFullTableName out $OutputFullFileName -T -c $ServerOption
}

It works great, but now some of the tables need to be extracted via views, and some don't. So I need a data structure something like this:

"Page"                      "vExtractPage"
, "ChecklistItemCategory"   "ChecklistItemCategory"
, "ChecklistItem"           "vExtractChecklistItem"

I was looking at hashes, but I'm not finding anything on how to loop through a hash. What would be the right thing to do here? Perhaps just use an array, but with both values, separated by space?

Or am I missing something obvious?

up vote 82 down vote accepted

Christian's answer works well and shows how you can loop through each hash table item using the GetEnumerator method. You can also loop through using the keys property. Here is an example how:

$hash = @{
    a = 1
    b = 2
    c = 3
}
$hash.Keys | % { "key = $_ , value = " + $hash.Item($_) }

Output:

key = c , value = 3
key = a , value = 1
key = b , value = 2
  • How can I enumerate the hash in another order? E.g. when I want to print its content in ascending order (here a ... b ... c). Is it even possible? – LPrc Oct 27 '17 at 14:14
  • 1
    Why $hash.Item($_) instead of $hash[$_]? – alvarez Nov 9 '17 at 14:34
  • 1
    @LPrc use the Sort-Object method to do that. This article does a pretty good explanation of it: technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee692803.aspx – chazbot7 Dec 28 '17 at 17:28
  • 1
    You could even use just $hash.$_. – TNT May 26 at 21:48

Shorthand is not preferred for scripts; it is less readable. The %{} operator is considered shorthand. Here's how it should be done in a script for readability and reusability:

Variable Setup

PS> $hash = @{
    a = 1
    b = 2
    c = 3
}
PS> $hash

Name                           Value
----                           -----
c                              3
b                              2
a                              1

Option 1: GetEnumerator()

Note: personal preference; syntax is easier to read

The GetEnumerator() method would be done as shown:

foreach ($h in $hash.GetEnumerator()) {
    Write-Host "$($h.Name): $($h.Value)"
}

Output:

c: 3
b: 2
a: 1

Option 2: Keys

The Keys method would be done as shown:

foreach ($h in $hash.Keys) {
    Write-Host "${h}: $($hash.Item($h))"
}

Output:

c: 3
b: 2
a: 1

Additional information

Be careful sorting your hashtable... Sort-Object may change it to an array:

PS> $hash.GetType()

IsPublic IsSerial Name                                     BaseType
-------- -------- ----                                     --------
True     True     Hashtable                                System.Object


PS> $hash = $hash.GetEnumerator() | Sort-Object Name
PS> $hash.GetType()

IsPublic IsSerial Name                                     BaseType
-------- -------- ----                                     --------
True     True     Object[]                                 System.Array

This and other PowerShell looping availble on my blog.

  • 3
    like this one more for readability, especially for not dedicate powershell developers like me. – anIBMer Aug 20 '14 at 13:32
  • 1
    I agree this method is easier to read and therfore probably better for scripting. – leinad13 Sep 9 '14 at 10:12
  • 2
    Readability aside, there is one difference between VertigoRay's solution and Andy's solution. %{} is an alias for ForEach-Object, which is different than the foreach statement here. ForEach-Object makes use of the pipeline, which can be much faster if you're already working with a pipeline. The foreach statement does not; it's a simple loop. – JamesQMurphy Jan 3 '15 at 3:12
  • 2
    @JamesQMurphy I copy and pasted the answer provided by @andy-arismendi from above; it is the popular pipeline solution for this question. Your statement, which peaked my interest, was that ForEach-Object (aka: %{}) is faster than foreach; I showed that is not faster. I wanted to demonstrate if your point was valid or not; because I, like most people, like my code to run as fast as possible. Now, your argument is changing to running jobs in parallel (potentially using multiple computers/servers) ... which of course is faster than running a job in series from a single thread. Cheers! – VertigoRay Aug 18 '15 at 18:48
  • 1
    @JamesQMurphy I would also think powershell follows the traditionnal advantage that shells give you when you pipe data streams between several processes: you get natural parallelism from the simple fact that each pipeline stage is an independent process (of course, a buffer may drain and in the end the whole pipeline goes as slow as its slowest process). That's different from having a pipeline process that decides on its own to spawn multiple threads, which is entirely dependent of the implementation details of the process itself. – Johan Boulé Jul 27 at 16:57

About loop through an hash:

$Q = @{"ONE"="1";"TWO"="2";"THREE"="3"}
$Q.GETENUMERATOR() | % { $_.VALUE }
1
3
2

$Q.GETENUMERATOR() | % { $_.key }
ONE
THREE
TWO

You can also do this without a variable

@{
  'foo' = 222
  'bar' = 333
  'baz' = 444
  'qux' = 555
} | % getEnumerator | % {
  $_.key
  $_.value
}
  • This gets me a " ForEach-Object : Cannot bind parameter 'Process'. Cannot convert the "getEnumerator" value of type "System.String" to type "System.Management.Automation.ScriptBlock" – luis.espinal Jan 27 '16 at 16:46

Here is another quick way, just using the key as an index into the hash table to get the value:

$hash = @{
    'a' = 1;
    'b' = 2;
    'c' = 3
};

foreach($key in $hash.keys) {
    Write-Host ("Key = " + $key + " and Value = " + $hash[$key]);
}

If you're using PowerShell v3, you can use JSON instead of a hashtable, and convert it to an object with Convert-FromJson:

@'
[
    {
        FileName = "Page";
        ObjectName = "vExtractPage";
    },
    {
        ObjectName = "ChecklistItemCategory";
    },
    {
        ObjectName = "ChecklistItem";
    },
]
'@ | 
    Convert-FromJson |
    ForEach-Object {
        $InputFullTableName = '{0}{1}' -f $TargetDatabase,$_.ObjectName

        # In strict mode, you can't reference a property that doesn't exist, 
        #so check if it has an explicit filename firest.
        $outputFileName = $_.ObjectName
        if( $_ | Get-Member FileName )
        {
            $outputFileName = $_.FileName
        }
        $OutputFullFileName = Join-Path $OutputDirectory $outputFileName

        bcp $InputFullTableName out $OutputFullFileName -T -c $ServerOption
    }
  • n.b. the command is ConvertFrom-Json (and the converse, ConvertTo-Json) -- just swap the dash placement. – atmarx Oct 20 '15 at 20:14

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