312

Often I want to check if a provided value matches one in a list (e.g. when validating):

if (!acceptedValues.Any(v => v == someValue))
{
    // exception logic
}

Recently, I've noticed ReSharper asking me to simplify these queries to:

if (acceptedValues.All(v => v != someValue))
{
    // exception logic
}

Obviously, this is logically identical, perhaps slightly more readable (if you've done a lot of mathematics), my question is: does this result in a performance hit?

It feels like it should (i.e. .Any() sounds like it short-circuits, whereas .All() sounds like it does not), but I have nothing to substantiate this. Does anyone have deeper knowledge as to whether the queries will resolve the same, or whether ReSharper is leading me astray?

7
  • 6
    Have you tried disassembling the Linq code to see what it's doing?
    – RQDQ
    Jan 27, 2012 at 0:33
  • 9
    In this case I would actually go with if(!acceptedValues.Contains(someValue)), but of course this was not the question :)
    – csgero
    Apr 12, 2012 at 16:13
  • 2
    @csgero I agree. The above was a simplification (perhaps over-simplification) of the real logic.
    – Mark
    Oct 3, 2012 at 7:17
  • 2
    "It feels like it should (i.e. .Any() sounds like it short-circuits, whereas .All() sounds like it does not)" -- Not to anyone with sound intuitions. The are logical equivalence you note implies that they are equally short-circuitable. A moment's thought reveals that All can quit as soon as a non-qualifying case is encountered.
    – Jim Balter
    May 16, 2014 at 20:07
  • 4
    I do not universally agree with ReSharper on this. Write sensible trains of thought. If you want to throw an exception if a required item is missing: if (!sequence.Any(v => v == true)). If you wish to continue only if everything conforms to a certain specification: if (sequence.All(v => v < 10)).
    – Timo
    Jul 1, 2015 at 10:45

8 Answers 8

377

Implementation of All according to ILSpy (as in I actually went and looked, rather than the "well, that method works a bit like ..." I might do if we were discussing the theory rather than the impact).

public static bool All<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    if (predicate == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("predicate");
    }
    foreach (TSource current in source)
    {
        if (!predicate(current))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Implementation of Any according to ILSpy:

public static bool Any<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    if (predicate == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("predicate");
    }
    foreach (TSource current in source)
    {
        if (predicate(current))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Of course, there could be some subtle difference in the IL produced. But no, no there isn't. The IL is pretty much the same but for the obvious inversion of returning true on predicate match versus returning false on predicate mismatch.

This is linq-for-objects only of course. It's possible that some other linq provider treats one much better than the other, but then if that was the case, it's pretty much random which one got the more optimal implementation.

It would seem that the rule comes down solely to someone feeling that if(determineSomethingTrue) is simpler and more readable than if(!determineSomethingFalse). And in fairness, I think they've a bit of a point in that I often find if(!someTest) confusing* when there's an alternative test of equal verbosity and complexity that would return true for the condition we want to act upon. Yet really, I personally find nothing to favour one over the other of the two alternatives you give, and would perhaps lean very slightly toward the former if the predicate were more complicated.

*Not confusing as in I don't understand, but confusing as in I worry that there's some subtle reason for the decision that I don't understand, and it takes a few mental skips to realise that "no, they just decided to do it that way, wait what was I looking at this bit of code for again?..."

11
  • 9
    I'm not sure what is done behind the lines, but for me is much more readable is: if (not any) than if (all not equal).
    – VikciaR
    Aug 7, 2012 at 6:15
  • 63
    There is a BIG difference when your enumeration has no values. 'Any' would always return FALSE, and 'All' always return TRUE. So saying than one is the logical equivalent of the other is not entirely true!
    – Arnaud
    Mar 24, 2013 at 22:41
  • 54
    @Arnaud Any will return false and hence !Any will return true, so they're identical.
    – Jon Hanna
    May 30, 2013 at 10:31
  • 14
    @Arnaud There is not any person who commented who said that Any and All are logically equivalent. Or to put it another way, all persons who commented did not say that Any and All are logically equivalent. The equivalence is between !Any(predicate) and All(!predicate).
    – Jim Balter
    Aug 20, 2013 at 5:50
  • 9
    @MacsDickinson that's not a difference at all, because you're not comparing opposite predicates. The equivalent to !test.Any(x => x.Key == 3 && x.Value == 1) that uses All is test.All(x => !(x.Key == 3 && x.Value == 1)) (which is indeed equivalent to test.All(x => x.Key != 3 || x.Value != 1)).
    – Jon Hanna
    Sep 18, 2013 at 14:05
68

You might find these extension methods make your code more readable:

public static bool None<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    return !source.Any();
}

public static bool None<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, 
                                 Func<TSource, bool> predicate)
{
    return !source.Any(predicate);
}

Now instead of your original

if (!acceptedValues.Any(v => v == someValue))
{
    // exception logic
}

you could say

if (acceptedValues.None(v => v == someValue))
{
    // exception logic
}
3
  • 6
    Thanks - I was already thinking of implementing these in our commons library, but I haven't decided if it is a good idea yet. I agree that they make the code more readable, but I am concerned that they don't add sufficient value.
    – Mark
    Jan 28, 2012 at 7:17
  • 3
    I looked for None and didn't find it. It is very much more readable.
    – Rhyous
    Feb 10, 2018 at 2:15
  • I had to add null checks: return source == null || !source.Any(predicate);
    – Rhyous
    Feb 10, 2018 at 2:23
32

Both would have identical performance because both stop enumeration after the outcome can be determined - Any() on the first item the passed predicate evaluates to true and All() on the first item the predicate evaluates to false.

0
21

All short circuits on the first non-match, so it's not a problem.

One area of subtlety is that

 bool allEven = Enumerable.Empty<int>().All(i => i % 2 == 0); 

Is true. All of the items in the sequence are even.

For more on this method, consult the documentation for Enumerable.All.

8
  • 13
    Yes, but bool allEven = !Enumerable.Empty<int>().Any(i => i % 2 != 0) is true too.
    – Jon Hanna
    Jan 27, 2012 at 0:40
  • 1
    @Jon semantically none != all. So semantically you either have none or all but in the case of .All() none is just a subset of all the collections that return true for all and that discrepancy can result in bugs if you are unaware of it. +1 for that Anthony
    – Rune FS
    Jan 27, 2012 at 9:33
  • @RuneFS I don't follow. Semantically and logically "none where it is untrue that..." is indeed the same as "all where it is true that". E.g. "where none of the accepted projects from our company?" will always have the same answer as "where all of the accepted projects from other companies?"...
    – Jon Hanna
    Jan 27, 2012 at 9:59
  • ... Now, it's true that you can have bugs from assuming "all the items are..." means there is at least one item that is at least one item that fulfils the test, since the "all the items..." is always true for the empty set, I don't dispute that at all. I added though that the same problem can happen with assuming "none of the items..." means at least one items doesn't fulfill the test, since "none of the items..." is also always true for the empty set. It's not that I disagree with Anthony's point, its that I think it also holds for the other of the two constructs under discussion.
    – Jon Hanna
    Jan 27, 2012 at 10:01
  • @Jon you are talking logic and I am talking linguistics. The human brain can't process a negative (before it process the positive at which point it can then negate it) so in that sense there's quite a difference between the two. That doesn't make the logic you propose incorrect
    – Rune FS
    Jan 27, 2012 at 10:09
10

As other answers have well covered: this is not about performance, it's about clarity.

There's wide support for both of your options:

if (!acceptedValues.Any(v => v == someValue))
{
    // exception logic
}

if (acceptedValues.All(v => v != someValue))
{
    // exception logic
}

But I think this might achieve broader support:

var isValueAccepted = acceptedValues.Any(v => v == someValue);
if (!isValueAccepted)
{
    // exception logic
}

Simply computing the boolean (and naming it) before negating anything clears this up a lot in my mind.

1
  • I am all for well-named "explaining variables" when evaluating conditions, and frequently use them in my code, yet I still come up against resistance sometimes in code reviews as it adds more "unnecessary" lines to the member. However, in your case I would negate the explaining variable so you can read if (valueIsNotAccepted) { ... } to get rid of the ! negation in the parenthesis.
    – Dib
    Aug 13, 2021 at 8:11
10

If you take a look at the Enumerable source you'll see that the implementation of Any and All is quite close:

public static bool Any<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate) {
    if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    if (predicate == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("predicate");
    foreach (TSource element in source) {
        if (predicate(element)) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

public static bool All<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate) {
    if (source == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    if (predicate == null) throw Error.ArgumentNull("predicate");
    foreach (TSource element in source) {
        if (!predicate(element)) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

There is no way that one method be significantly faster than the other since the only difference lies in a boolean negation, so prefer readability over false performance win.

9

All() determines whether all elements of a sequence satisfy a condition.
Any() determines whether any element of a sequence satisfies the condition.

var numbers = new[]{1,2,3};

numbers.All(n => n % 2 == 0); // returns false
numbers.Any(n => n % 2 == 0); // returns true
6

According to this link

Any – Checks for at least one match

All – Checks that all match

1
  • 3
    you are right but they stop at the same time for a given collection. All breaks when condition fails and Any Breaks when it matches your predicate. So Technically no different except scenatically
    – WPFKK
    Aug 14, 2017 at 21:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.