I have to find the average of a list in Python. This is my code so far

l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l)

I've got it so it adds together the values in the list, but I don't know how to make it divide into them?

  • 35
    numpy.mean if you can afford installing numpy – mitch Jan 27 '12 at 21:00
  • 5
    sum(L) / float(len(L)). handle empty lists in caller code like if not L: ... – n611x007 Nov 2 '15 at 12:12
  • please update your post and remove reduce and lambda because people are copying this from the top for bad use-cases. (well, unless you have pressing reason to use them.) – n611x007 Nov 2 '15 at 12:14
  • 3
    @mitch: it's not a matter of whether you can afford installing numpy. numpy is a whole word in itself. It's whether you actually need numpy. Installing numpy, a 16mb C extension, for mean calculating would be, well, very impractical, for someone not using it for other things. – n611x007 Nov 2 '15 at 12:15
  • 3
    instead of installing the whole numpy package for just avg/mean if using python 3 we can get this thing done using statistic module just by "from statistic import mean" or if on python 2.7 or less, the statistic module can be downloaded from src: hg.python.org/cpython/file/default/Lib/statistics.py doc: docs.python.org/dev/library/statistics.html and directly used. – 25mhz Jul 18 '16 at 4:48

21 Answers 21

up vote 440 down vote accepted

If your reduce is already returning your sum, then all you have left to do is divide.

l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l) / len(l)

though sum(l)/len(l) would be simpler, as you wouldn't need a lambda.

If you want a more exact float result instead of an int then just use float(len(l)) instead of len(l).

  • 9
    if the list is composed of ints, the the result under python 2 will be an int – mitch Jan 27 '12 at 21:01
  • 1
    Well, that might be what they want. :) – Herms Jan 27 '12 at 21:02
  • 7
    as i said, i'm new to this, i was thinking i'd have to make it with a loop or something to count the amount of numbers in it, i didn't realise i could just use the length. this is the first thing i've done with python.. – Carla Dessi Jan 27 '12 at 21:53
  • 2
    what if the sum is a massive number that wont fit in int/float ? – Foo Bar User Feb 15 '14 at 0:23
  • 5
    @FooBarUser then you should calc k = 1.0/len(l), and then reduce: reduce(lambda x, y: x + y * k, l) – Arseniy May 14 '14 at 5:09
l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
sum(l) / float(len(l))
  • 60
    If you use from __future__ import division, you can eliminate that ugly float. – S.Lott Jan 27 '12 at 21:17
  • 12
    Agreed. float is ugly as hell, just wanted to keep it simpler. – yprez Jan 27 '12 at 21:28
  • 38
    Another way of eliminate that 'ugly' float: sum(l, 0.0) / len(l) – remosu Jun 16 '13 at 9:48
  • 22
    As a C++ programmer, that is neat as hell and float is not ugly at all! – lahjaton_j Apr 22 '16 at 12:33
  • 13
    In python3, you can just use sum(l) / len(l) – VasyaNovikov May 24 '17 at 14:39

Or you could use numpy.mean:

l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]

import numpy as np
print np.mean(l)
  • 3
    That's strange. I would have assumed this would be much more efficient, but it appears to take 8 times as long on a random list of floats than simply sum(l)/len(l) – L. Amber O'Hearn Sep 23 '15 at 19:04
  • 5
    Oh, but np.array(l).mean() is much faster. – L. Amber O'Hearn Sep 23 '15 at 19:16
  • 7
    @L.AmberO'Hearn, I just timed it and np.mean(l) and np.array(l).mean are about the same speed, and sum(l)/len(l) is about twice as fast. I used l = list(np.random.rand(1000)), for course both numpy methods become much faster if l is numpy.array. – Akavall Sep 23 '15 at 19:52
  • 8
    well, unless that's the sole reason for installing numpy. installing a 16mb C package of whatever fame for mean calculation looks very strange on this scale. – n611x007 Nov 2 '15 at 12:02
  • but in my mind.there's not need to care about speed in normal condition.. – tyan Aug 25 '16 at 8:01

A statistics module has been added to python 3.4. It has a function to calculate the average called mean. An example with the list you provided would be:

from statistics import mean
l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
mean(l)
  • 25
    This is the most elegant answer because it employs a standard library module which is available since python 3.4. – Serge Stroobandt Jun 20 '15 at 20:47
  • 2
    And it is numerically stabler – Antti Haapala May 18 '16 at 18:49

Why would you use reduce() for this when Python has a perfectly cromulent sum() function?

print sum(l) / float(len(l))

(The float() is necessary to force Python to do a floating-point division.)

There is a statistics library if you are using python >= 3.4

https://docs.python.org/3/library/statistics.html

You may use it's mean method like this. Let's say you have a list of numbers of which you want to find mean:-

list = [11, 13, 12, 15, 17]
import statistics as s
s.mean(list)

It has other methods too like stdev, variance, mode, harmonic mean, median etc which are too useful.

Instead of casting to float, you can add 0.0 to the sum:

def avg(l):
    return sum(l, 0.0) / len(l)
  • 1
    That's really slick. – kindall Sep 16 '15 at 23:38
  • 7
    That's really sick – juanjux Dec 10 '15 at 15:13

sum(l) / float(len(l)) is the right answer, but just for completeness you can compute an average with a single reduce:

>>> reduce(lambda x, y: x + y / float(len(l)), l, 0)
20.111111111111114

Note that this can result in a slight rounding error:

>>> sum(l) / float(len(l))
20.111111111111111
  • That's clever, wouldn't have thought of it! – kindall Jan 27 '12 at 21:26
  • I get that this is just for fun but returning 0 for an empty list may not be the best thing to do – Johan Lundberg Jan 28 '12 at 0:38
  • 1
    @JohanLundberg - You could replace the 0 with False as the last argument to reduce() which would give you False for an empty list, otherwise the average as before. – Andrew Clark Jan 28 '12 at 0:47
  • @AndrewClark why do you force floaton len? – EndermanAPM Jun 15 '17 at 10:54

I tried using the options above but didn't work. Try this:

from statistics import mean

n = [11, 13, 15, 17, 19]
print(n)
print(mean(n))

worked on python 3.5

I had a similar question to solve in a Udacity´s problems. Instead of a built-in function i coded:

def list_mean(n):

    summing = float(sum(n))
    count = float(len(n))
    if n == []:
        return False
    return float(summing/count)

Much more longer than usual but for a beginner its quite challenging.

  • 1
    Good. Every other answer didn't notice the empty list hazard! – wsysuper Apr 6 '15 at 11:14
  • i scored +1 because of this little detail – Paulo YC Apr 10 '15 at 0:25
  • 1
    Returning False (equivalent to the integer 0) is just about the worst possible way to handle this error. Better to catch the ZeroDivisionError and raise something better (perhaps ValueError). – kindall Jun 14 '16 at 1:39
  • @kindall how is a ValueError any better than a ZeroDivisionError? The latter is more specific, plus it seems a bit unnecessary to catch an arithmetic error only to re-throw a different one. – MatTheWhale Mar 27 at 16:45
  • Because ZeroDivisionError is only useful if you know how the calculation is being done (i.e., that a division by the length of the list is involved). If you don't know that, it doesn't tell you what the problem is with the value you passed in. Whereas your new exception can include that more specific information. – kindall Mar 27 at 18:34

In order to use reduce for taking a running average, you'll need to track the total but also the total number of elements seen so far. since that's not a trivial element in the list, you'll also have to pass reduce an extra argument to fold into.

>>> l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
>>> running_average = reduce(lambda aggr, elem: (aggr[0] + elem, aggr[1]+1), l, (0.0,0))
>>> running_average[0]
(181.0, 9)
>>> running_average[0]/running_average[1]
20.111111111111111
  • 1
    interesting but that's not what he asked for. – Johan Lundberg Jan 27 '12 at 22:04

Both can give you close to similar values on an integer or at least 10 decimal values. But if you are really considering long floating values both can be different. Approach can vary on what you want to achieve.

>>> l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
>>> print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l) / len(l)
20
>>> sum(l)/len(l)
20

Floating values

>>> print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l) / float(len(l))
20.1111111111
>>> print sum(l)/float(len(l))
20.1111111111

@Andrew Clark was correct on his statement.

suppose that

x = [[-5.01,-5.43,1.08,0.86,-2.67,4.94,-2.51,-2.25,5.56,1.03], [-8.12,-3.48,-5.52,-3.78,0.63,3.29,2.09,-2.13,2.86,-3.33], [-3.68,-3.54,1.66,-4.11,7.39,2.08,-2.59,-6.94,-2.26,4.33]]

you can notice that x has dimension 3*10 if you need to get the mean to each row you can type this

theMean = np.mean(x1,axis=1)

don't forget to import numpy as np

If you wanted to get more than just the mean (aka average) you might check out scipy stats

from scipy import stats
l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
print(stats.describe(l))

# DescribeResult(nobs=9, minmax=(2, 78), mean=20.11111111111111, 
# variance=572.3611111111111, skewness=1.7791785448425341, 
# kurtosis=1.9422716419666397)

as a beginner, I just coded this:

L = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]

total = 0

def average(numbers):
    total = sum(numbers)
    total = float(total)
    return total / len(numbers)

print average(L)

Or use pandas's Series.mean method:

pd.Series(sequence).mean()

Demo:

>>> import pandas as pd
>>> l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]
>>> pd.Series(l).mean()
20.11111111111111
>>> 

From the docs:

Series.mean(axis=None, skipna=None, level=None, numeric_only=None, **kwargs)

And here is the docs for this:

https://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.Series.mean.html

And the whole documentation:

https://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/10min.html

l = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]

l = map(float,l)
print '%.2f' %(sum(l)/len(l))
  • 3
    Can you provide a description not just code? – Alex Wiese Dec 4 '12 at 6:08
  • 2
    Inefficient. It converts all elements to float before adding them. It's faster to convert just the length. – Chris Koston Nov 26 '13 at 19:05
print reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, l)/(len(l)*1.0)

or like posted previously

sum(l)/(len(l)*1.0)

The 1.0 is to make sure you get a floating point division

Combining a couple of the above answers, I've come up with the following which works with reduce and doesn't assume you have L available inside the reducing function:

from operator import truediv

L = [15, 18, 2, 36, 12, 78, 5, 6, 9]

def sum_and_count(x, y):
    try:
        return (x[0] + y, x[1] + 1)
    except TypeError:
        return (x + y, 2)

truediv(*reduce(sum_and_count, L))

# prints 
20.11111111111111

I want to add just another approach

import itertools,operator
list(itertools.accumulate(l,operator.add)).pop(-1) / len(l)
numbers = [0,1,2,3]

numbers[0] = input("Please enter a number")

numbers[1] = input("Please enter a second number")

numbers[2] = input("Please enter a third number")

numbers[3] = input("Please enter a fourth number")

print (numbers)

print ("Finding the Avarage")

avarage = int(numbers[0]) + int(numbers[1]) + int(numbers[2]) + int(numbers [3]) / 4

print (avarage)
  • what if the user adds floating point numbers to your array? The results will be super imprecise. – Flame_Phoenix Nov 17 '16 at 9:19

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