Here's a tough one(atleast i had a hard time :P):

find the index of the highest bit set of a 32-bit number without using any loops.

10 Answers 10

up vote 5 down vote accepted

With recursion:

int firstset(int bits) {        
     return (bits & 0x80000000) ? 31 : firstset((bits << 1) | 1) - 1;
}
  • Assumes [31,..,0] indexing
  • Returns -1 if no bits set
  • | 1 prevents stack overflow by capping the number of shifts until a 1 is reached (32)
  • Not tail recursive :)
  • I do not understand the |1)-1 part. why are you doing that ? – Kshitij Banerjee Jan 31 '12 at 12:06
  • 1
    @KshitijBanerjee this sets index of 0 to one after every shift. Otherwise you'll shift forever if the number is zero. – paislee Jan 31 '12 at 15:35

Floor of logarithm-base-two should do the trick (though you have to special-case 0).

Floor of log base 2 of 0001 is 0 (bit with index 0 is set).
 "           "      of 0010 is 1 (bit with index 1 is set).
 "           "      of 0011 is 1 (bit with index 1 is set).
 "           "      of 0100 is 2 (bit with index 2 is set).
and so on.

On an unrelated note, this is actually a pretty terrible interview question (I say this as someone who does technical interviews for potential candidates), because it really doesn't correspond to anything you do in practical programming.

Your boss isn't going to come up to you one day and say "hey, so we have a rush job for this latest feature, and it needs to be implemented without loops!"

  • and how does that work ? – Kshitij Banerjee Jan 28 '12 at 0:28
  • 2
    I am pretty sure calculating log is more expensive than 32 shifts! – ElKamina Jan 28 '12 at 0:28
  • and does'nt log use looping internally? – Kshitij Banerjee Jan 28 '12 at 0:30
  • 2
    @ElKamina - The question didn't ask for it to be fast. Kshitij - most code uses looping internally. – Amber Jan 28 '12 at 0:32
  • 2
    Also, calculating a logarithm is almost certainly faster than calling a recursive function up to 32 times, due to function call overhead. – Amber Jan 28 '12 at 0:40

You could do it like this (not optimised):

int index = 0;
uint32_t temp = number;

if ((temp >> 16) != 0) {
    temp >>= 16;
    index += 16;
}

if ((temp >> 8) != 0) {
    temp >>= 8
    index += 8;
}

...
  • Compiler will probably store the result of the right shift, but just in case, I would do if ((temp2 = temp >> 16) != 0) { temp = temp2; ... – Paul Chernoch Apr 4 '12 at 12:30

this can be done as a binary search, reducing complexity of O(N) (for an N-bit word) to O(log(N)). A possible implementation is:

int highest_bit_index(uint32_t value)
{ 
  if(value == 0) return 0;
  int depth = 0;
  int exponent = 16;

  while(exponent > 0)
  {
    int shifted = value >> (exponent);
    if(shifted > 0)
    {
      depth += exponent;
      if(shifted == 1) return depth + 1;
      value >>= exponent;
    }
    exponent /= 2;
  }

  return depth + 1;
}

the input is a 32 bit unsigned integer. it has a loop that can be converted into 5 levels of if-statements , therefore resulting in 32 or so if-statements. you could also use recursion to get rid of the loop, or the absolutely evil "goto" ;)

Let n - Decimal number for which bit location to be identified start - Indicates decimal value of ( 1 << 32 ) - 2147483648 bitLocation - Indicates bit location which is set to 1

public int highestBitSet(int n, long start, int bitLocation)
{
    if (start == 0)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    if ((start & n) > 0)
    {
        return bitLocation;
    }
    else
    {
        return highestBitSet(n, (start >> 1), --bitLocation);
    }
}

    long i = 1;
    long startIndex = (i << 31);
    int bitLocation = 32;
    int value = highestBitSet(64, startIndex, bitLocation);
    System.out.println(value);
int high_bit_set(int n, int pos)
{
if(pos<0) 
return -1;
else
return (0x80000000 & n)?pos:high_bit_set((n<<1),--pos);
}

main()
{
int n=0x23;
int high_pos = high_bit_set(n,31);
printf("highest index = %d",high_pos);
}

From your main call function high_bit_set(int n , int pos) with the input value n, and default 31 as the highest position. And the function is like above.

Paislee's solution is actually pretty easy to make tail-recursive, though, it's a much slower solution than the suggested floor(log2(n));

int firstset_tr(int bits, int final_dec) {

     // pass in 0 for final_dec on first call, or use a helper function

     if (bits & 0x80000000) {
      return 31-final_dec;
     } else {
      return firstset_tr( ((bits << 1) | 1), final_dec+1 );
     }
}

This function also works for other bit sizes, just change the check, e.g.

if (bits & 0x80) {   // for 8-bit
  return 7-final_dec;
}

sorry for bumping an old thread, but how about this

inline int ilog2(unsigned long long i) {
  union { float f; int i; } = { i }; 
  return (u.i>>23)-27;
}
...
int highest=ilog2(x); highest+=(x>>highest)-1;
// and in case you need it
int lowest = ilog2((x^x-1)+1)-1;

Note that what you are trying to do is calculate the integer log2 of an integer,

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

unsigned int
Log2(unsigned long x)
{
    unsigned long n = x;
    int bits = sizeof(x)*8;
    int step = 1; int k=0;
    for( step = 1; step < bits; ) {
        n |= (n >> step);
        step *= 2; ++k;
    }
    //printf("%ld %ld\n",x, (x - (n >> 1)) );
    return(x - (n >> 1));
}

Observe that you can attempt to search more than 1 bit at a time.

unsigned int
Log2_a(unsigned long x)
{
    unsigned long n = x;
    int bits = sizeof(x)*8;
    int step = 1;
    int step2 = 0;
    //observe that you can move 8 bits at a time, and there is a pattern...
    //if( x>1<<step2+8 ) { step2+=8;
        //if( x>1<<step2+8 ) { step2+=8;
            //if( x>1<<step2+8 ) { step2+=8;
            //}
        //}
    //}
    for( step2=0; x>1L<<step2+8; ) {
        step2+=8;
    }
    //printf("step2 %d\n",step2);
    for( step = 0; x>1L<<(step+step2); ) {
        step+=1;
        //printf("step %d\n",step+step2);
    }
    printf("log2(%ld) %d\n",x,step+step2);
    return(step+step2);
}

This approach uses a binary search

unsigned int
Log2_b(unsigned long x)
{
    unsigned long n = x;
    unsigned int bits = sizeof(x)*8;
    unsigned int hbit = bits-1;
    unsigned int lbit = 0;
    unsigned long guess = bits/2;
    int found = 0;

    while ( hbit-lbit>1 ) {
        //printf("log2(%ld) %d<%d<%d\n",x,lbit,guess,hbit);
        //when value between guess..lbit
        if( (x<=(1L<<guess)) ) {
           //printf("%ld < 1<<%d %ld\n",x,guess,1L<<guess);
            hbit=guess;
            guess=(hbit+lbit)/2;
            //printf("log2(%ld) %d<%d<%d\n",x,lbit,guess,hbit);
        }
        //when value between hbit..guess
        //else
        if( (x>(1L<<guess)) ) {
            //printf("%ld > 1<<%d %ld\n",x,guess,1L<<guess);
            lbit=guess;
            guess=(hbit+lbit)/2;
            //printf("log2(%ld) %d<%d<%d\n",x,lbit,guess,hbit);
        }
    }
    if( (x>(1L<<guess)) ) ++guess;
    printf("log2(x%ld)=r%d\n",x,guess);
    return(guess);
}

Another binary search method, perhaps more readable,

unsigned int
Log2_c(unsigned long x)
{
    unsigned long v = x;
    unsigned int bits = sizeof(x)*8;
    unsigned int step = bits;
    unsigned int res = 0;
    for( step = bits/2; step>0; )
    {
        //printf("log2(%ld) v %d >> step %d = %ld\n",x,v,step,v>>step);
        while ( v>>step ) {
            v>>=step;
            res+=step;
            //printf("log2(%ld) step %d res %d v>>step %ld\n",x,step,res,v);
        }
        step /= 2;
    }
    if( (x>(1L<<res)) ) ++res;
    printf("log2(x%ld)=r%ld\n",x,res);
    return(res);
}

And because you will want to test these,

int main()
{
    unsigned long int x = 3;
    for( x=2; x<1000000000; x*=2 ) {
        //printf("x %ld, x+1 %ld, log2(x+1) %d\n",x,x+1,Log2(x+1));
        printf("x %ld, x+1 %ld, log2_a(x+1) %d\n",x,x+1,Log2_a(x+1));
        printf("x %ld, x+1 %ld, log2_b(x+1) %d\n",x,x+1,Log2_b(x+1));
        printf("x %ld, x+1 %ld, log2_c(x+1) %d\n",x,x+1,Log2_c(x+1));
    }
    return(0);
}

well from what I know the function Log is Implemented very efficiently in most programming languages, and even if it does contain loops , it is probably very few of them , internally So I would say that in most cases using the log would be faster , and more direct. you do have to check for 0 though and avoid taking the log of 0, as that would cause the program to crash.

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