12

Right now I'm building a small app that imports data from a spreadsheet and due to the nature of the original entry, there is a string being read in that has values such as 8½, 2½, etc.

My goal with a simple function is to convert 2½ into float 2.5, for example.

I've tried the .to_f method but that has left me with a weird value of 2.02½.

Any insight or suggestions here would be very much appreciated!

3
  • Can the source spreadsheet be changed? If the field type can be changed to decimal/numeric I would think you can avoid that entirely
    – Evan
    Jan 29 '12 at 7:10
  • It can, and I was weighing whether it would be faster to do it programmatically or not. I have 17 spreadsheets with around 17 rows in each. It really shouldn't be much to change Jan 29 '12 at 7:12
  • 1
    Automation is respectable for sure! I personally am not aware of how to accomplish this, but this thread indicates it may not be easily accomplished (with 2½ specifically) => stackoverflow.com/a/2259624/691986 If this is the only case of a mixed number, a mix of that solution with some specific code handling would probably get you where you need to be
    – Evan
    Jan 29 '12 at 7:16
13

Unicode only supports a small number of vulgar fractions so a simple lookup table will do the trick:

# You might want to double check this mapping
vulgar_to_float = {
    "\u00BC" => 1.0 / 4.0,
    "\u00BD" => 1.0 / 2.0,
    "\u00BE" => 3.0 / 4.0,
    "\u2150" => 1.0 / 7.0,
    "\u2151" => 1.0 / 9.0,
    "\u2152" => 1.0 /10.0,
    "\u2153" => 1.0 / 3.0,
    "\u2154" => 2.0 / 3.0,
    "\u2155" => 1.0 / 5.0,
    "\u2156" => 2.0 / 5.0,
    "\u2157" => 3.0 / 5.0,
    "\u2158" => 4.0 / 5.0,
    "\u2159" => 1.0 / 6.0,
    "\u215A" => 5.0 / 6.0,
    "\u215B" => 1.0 / 8.0,
    "\u215C" => 3.0 / 8.0,
    "\u215D" => 5.0 / 8.0,
    "\u215E" => 7.0 / 8.0,
    "\u2189" => 0.0 / 3.0,
}

Then, a little bit of regex wrangling to pull your "number" apart:

s = "2½"
_, int_part, vulgar_part = *s.match(/(\d+)?(\D+)?/)

And finally, put them together taking care to properly deal with possible nils from the regex:

float_version = int_part.to_i + vulgar_to_float[vulgar_part].to_f

Remember that nil.to_i is 0 and nil.to_f is 0.0.

2
  • -1, reimplements Unicode poorly. (For example, you missed 2189.)
    – user79758
    Jan 29 '12 at 11:46
  • 5
    @Joe: And what is "\u2189"? Zero. So it has no effect on the result. And there are only 19 vulgar fractions in Unicode, Roman numerals and other number forms are irrelevant to this question. Jan 29 '12 at 17:18
6

Substitute the halves with ".5"

input = "2½"
input.gsub!("½", ".5")
input.to_f # => 2.5

As an aside, make sure you really want to use floats and not something like BigDecimal.

Here is a page explaining the problem with floats (it's Python, but Ruby and many other languages represent floats the same way, and thus have the same issues).

2
  • 1
    Shouldn't it be input.gsub!("½", ".5")?
    – Nolan Amy
    Jan 29 '12 at 7:48
  • 2
    Being specific makes it easy to understand. It is significantly easier to understand than any of the other answers. Regardless, no general problem has been specified, so a general answer must be a guess. Guessing at requirements is historically unreliable (think YAGNI and "the simplest thing that could possibly work"). Jan 29 '12 at 18:25
2

Similar to @muistooshort's answer, I'd use a hash as a lookup table, but I'd take advantage of sub:

# encoding: UTF-8

LOOKUP = {
  "½" => 1.0/2,
  # ...
  "⅞" => 7.0/8,
}

LOOKUP_REGEX = Regexp.union(LOOKUP.keys) # => /½|⅞/ 

'2½'.sub(LOOKUP_REGEX) { |m| LOOKUP[m].to_s[1..-1] } # => "2.5" 
'2⅞'.sub(LOOKUP_REGEX) { |m| LOOKUP[m].to_s[1..-1] } # => "2.875" 

To make it more convenient and prettier:

class String
  def v_to_f
    sub(LOOKUP_REGEX) { |m| LOOKUP[m].to_s[1..-1] }
  end
end

'2½'.v_to_f # => "2.5" 
'2⅞'.v_to_f # => "2.875" 
5
  • -1, similar to muistooshort's answer, you're reimplementing Unicode standard data poorly.
    – user79758
    Jan 29 '12 at 11:50
  • 1
    Why don't you explain your concern and provide a solution? Marking the answers down, and quoting the Unicode tables doesn't help the OP find a solution. Jan 29 '12 at 11:52
  • The Unicode tables are the solution. You parse the Unicode tables. This gives you the correct value for each codepoint.
    – user79758
    Jan 29 '12 at 11:54
  • Parsing the Unicode table would provide "1/2", which in Ruby would be 1/2==0. Is that preferable to 1.0/2==0.5? Your suggestion is not workable. Jan 29 '12 at 11:58
  • My solution assumes basic knowledge of Ruby (like, how to evaluate a simple fraction even though the text of both numerator and denominator are provided without a decimal point), which if the asker has already loaded a spreadsheet doesn't seem like a bad assumption.
    – user79758
    Jan 29 '12 at 11:59

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