85

I'm generating a html email that uses an internal stylesheet, i.e.

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
  <style type="text/css">
    h2.foo {color: red}    
  </style>
</head>
<body>
 <h2 class="foo">Email content here</foo>
</body>
</html>

When viewed in Gmail it seems all the styles in the internal stylesheet are ignored. It seems Gmail ignores all styles other than inline rules, e.g.

 <h2 style="color: red">Email content here</foo>

Is this my only option for styling HTML emails when viewed with Gmail?

  • 14
    Yes this is the only one since many web based e-mail clients do not recognize internal stylesheets. Actually the inline styleing is the recommended way to design html newsletters. – Mike Jan 29 '12 at 19:50
  • As far as I know, email readers can be expected to support html 3.2 and css 1.1. – bdares Jan 29 '12 at 19:51
  • How did you generate your email? I mean con you add the code of creating the intent? – RaphMclee Sep 3 '12 at 10:56
  • 7
    It's generally good practice to use an opening <html> tag ;) – Zaz May 22 '13 at 12:19
  • 1
    Gmail sucks. iOS app and Web based app too! – Adrian Florescu Mar 24 '15 at 12:22
62

Use inline styles for everything. This site will convert your classes to inline styles: http://premailer.dialect.ca/

  • 2
    This site is awesome. Shows warnings and gives you a plain text output as well as recrafting your HTML. – jamesbar2 Oct 10 '12 at 21:51
  • This Premailer is in Ruby, source: github.com/premailer/premailer. There's another one in Python: premailer.io source: github.com/peterbe/premailer, both are open source. – Maxime R. Jun 9 '16 at 10:15
  • This answer is no longer accurate. gmail supports styles and classes and has official docs on the subject - see Matthew Johnson's answer below. – mikemaccana Nov 3 '16 at 15:10
11

Gmail started basic support for style tags in the head area. Found nothing official yet but you can easily try it yourself.
It seems to ignore class and id selectors but basic element selectors work.

<!doctype html>
<html>
  <head>
    <style type="text/css">
      p{font-family:Tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:12px;margin:0}  
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <p>Email content here</p>
  </body>
</html>

it will create a style tag in its own head area limited to the div containing the mail body

<style>div.m14623dcb877eef15 p{font-family:Tahoma,sans-serif;font-size:12px;margin:0}</style>
  • It still doesn't support Media queries though which is a bit of a shame. Classes and IDs are kind of useful too :) – Eoin Mar 24 '16 at 13:01
  • 2
    They now do media queries too and fuller support for css styling. stackoverflow.com/questions/39759764/… – crowmagnumb Sep 30 '16 at 15:44
11

The answers here are outdated, as of today Sep 30 2016. Gmail is currently rolling out support for the style tag in the head, as well as media queries. If Gmail is your only concern, you're safe to use classes like a modern developer!

For reference, you can check the official gmail CSS docs.

As a side note, Gmail was the only major client that didn't support style (reference, until they update anyway). That means you can almost safely stop putting styles inline. Some of the more obscure clients may still need them.

  • 1
    It looks like that it still doesn't work. We tried it in Litmus, but it doesn't work. Is there any special reason ? – Arian Hosseinzadeh Oct 5 '16 at 18:19
  • @ArianHosseinzadeh What doesn't work? Added a reference to their documentation on the matter. – Matthew Johnson Oct 5 '16 at 18:24
  • We tried it in Litmus, and it ignores the non-inline stylings. Have you tried <style> for gmail after they announced it ? did it work ? – Arian Hosseinzadeh Oct 5 '16 at 18:36
  • 1
    @ArianHosseinzadeh I did a copy-n-paste from their example in their docs, and ran it through putsmail. Styles are showing in gmail. I verified Android gmail app and gmail in a Chrome browser. My guess is that the Litmus previews haven't been updated to reflect the change. – Matthew Johnson Oct 5 '16 at 18:57
  • 1
    I was wondering why my styles weren't working, and realized that I had placed them within the body tag instead of the head tag. – palswim Nov 13 '18 at 6:24
2

Note that services and tools for sending emails may be able to inline your CSS for you, allowing CSS in <style> tags to work in Gmail.

For instance, if you're sending emails with MailChimp, your CSS from <style> tags will get inlined automatically by default. With Mandrill, you can enable this functionality (although it's disabled by default for performance reasons) by checking the "Inline CSS Styles in HTML Emails" box in the "Sending Defaults" section of the Settings tab:

Image showing how to do this in Mandrill

1

I agree with everyone who supports classes AND inline styles. You might have learned this by now, but if there is a single mistake in your style sheet, Gmail will disregard it.

You might think that your CSS is perfect, because you've done it so often, why would I have mistakes in my CSS? Run it through the CSS Validator (for example http://www.css-validator.org/) and see what happens. I did that after encountering some Gmail display issues, and to my surprise, several Microsoft Outlook specific style declarations showed up as mistakes.

Which made sense to me, so I removed them from the style sheet and put them into a only for Microsoft code block, like so:

<!--[if mso]>
<style type="text/css">
body, table, td, .mobile-text {
font-family: Arial, sans-serif !important;
}
</style>
<xml>
  <o:OfficeDocumentSettings>
    <o:AllowPNG/>
    <o:PixelsPerInch>96</o:PixelsPerInch>
  </o:OfficeDocumentSettings>
</xml>
<![endif]-->

This is just a simple example, but, who know, it might come in handy some time.

0

As others have said, some email programs will not read the css styles. If you already have a web email written up you can use the following tool from zurb to inline all of your styles:

http://zurb.com/ink/inliner.php

This comes in extremely handy when using templates like those mentioned above from mailchimp, campaign monitor, etc. as they, as you have found, will not work in some email programs. This tool leaves your style section for the mail programs that will read it and puts all the styles inline to get more universal readability in the format that you wanted.

-1

Email HTML is quite annoying, making the CSS files internal would be a solution and there are tons of online converter on the internet. Even so, I would recommend you to take a look at 'mailchimp'. Pick one of the templates and go for exporting HTML to fix small details. Because bosses never satisfy and goes for outlook for next round.

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