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I am a newbie in vim. I want to use it as C++ IDE or something like this. I already install these plugins:

But I still cannot use them there is different errors or issues. Also I have a lot of questions how to configure vim to run/build/debug c++ code, for example with cmake, how to make it quick and professional with debug/release configuration separately. Can any sophisticated c++ vim programmers show me what do they use and with which configurations and at which point of their configuration I should pay attention?

Thanks.

I think zir archive with vim would be good to learn this stuff.

  • What exactly is the question? – Benjamin Bannier Jan 29 '12 at 20:52
  • @honk Can any sophisticated c++ vim programmers show me what do they use for c++ vim programming? List the plugins what are u using. List any personal or important settings what did you make to use vim for c++? And I be grateful if you upload you all your vim editor with all your configurations and other stuff which you suppose is important and helpful. Thanks. – Kron Jan 29 '12 at 20:58
  • Your current question has no right answer so it will likely be closed. I use a, alternate, surround, tabular, ctags integration and clang complete. For everything else there are Makefiles and :make (but that might be my opinion only). – Benjamin Bannier Jan 29 '12 at 21:05
  • Year it is great! I want at least one full personal opinion of professional c++ vim programmer than I assign it like a right answer. Please make an answer with more details which you suppose is important and upload a zip archive of your vim editor with all your configurations and other stuff which you suppose is important and helpful. – Kron Jan 29 '12 at 21:19
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    Please see stackoverflow.com/faq for what is on topic here and review your question. – Benjamin Bannier Jan 29 '12 at 21:23
2

Some of the most important IDE's features are:

  • Editing
  • Searching
  • Tags ("Goto Definition" in Visual Studio)
  • Source Control Integration
  • Building
  • Debugging

Emacs has typically tried to accomplish all of these things and more (including running a shell inside Emacs). Vi has typically been more lightweight but has gotten more functionality since the advent of Vim. I have not seriously tried to use Vim for building or debugging -- I find it difficult when I go to new projects that are using different build and debug environments.

However, there are many things that I do to integrate Vim with various IDE's and stay in Vim as much as possible.

See https://stackoverflow.com/a/8897164/1113528 for Tags, Source Control Integration, Clipboard, IDE integration (ability to jump to build errors). I also have a custom search plugin -- I think you would be better off looking for a more standard search vim plugin.

In order to switch between Visual Studio, Eclipse and Vim, I setup external spawning of Vim for Ctrl+Shift+V. To set this up, do the following:

Visual Studio

  1. Tools | External Tools | Add
  2. Title:Vim | Command:C:\Vim\vim73\gvim.exe | Arguments:--servername ext --remote-silent +$(CurLine) $(ItemPath)
  3. Move up to first position
  4. Tools | Options | Environment | Keyboard
  5. Show commands containing: Tools.ExternalCommand1
  6. Press shortcut keys: Ctrl+Shift+V
  7. Apply, OK

Eclipse

  1. Run | External Tools | External Tool Configurations
  2. Location: C:\Vim\vim73\gvim.exe
  3. Arguments: --servername ext --remote-silent ${resource_loc}
  4. Window | Preferences | General | Keys
  5. Filter Run Last
  6. Binding Ctrl+Shift+V
  7. Apply, OK
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