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Possible Duplicate:
Variables inside and outside of a class __init__() function

I noticed that in Python, people initialize their class attributes in two different ways.

The first way is like this:

class MyClass:
  __element1 = 123
  __element2 = "this is Africa"

  def __init__(self):
    #pass or something else

The other style looks like:

class MyClass:
  def __init__(self):
    self.__element1 = 123
    self.__element2 = "this is Africa"

Which is the correct way to initialize class attributes?

  • 4
    the diffence is not big if you use strings ... but it will get a complete different thing if you use dicts or lists that are stored by reference – Bastian Jan 29 '12 at 22:02
567

Neither way is necessarily correct or incorrect, they are just two different kinds of class elements:

  • Elements outside the __init__ method are static elements; they belong to the class.
  • Elements inside the __init__ method are elements of the object (self); they don't belong to the class.

You'll see it more clearly with some code:

class MyClass:
    static_elem = 123

    def __init__(self):
        self.object_elem = 456

c1 = MyClass()
c2 = MyClass()

# Initial values of both elements
>>> print c1.static_elem, c1.object_elem 
123 456
>>> print c2.static_elem, c2.object_elem
123 456

# Nothing new so far ...

# Let's try changing the static element
MyClass.static_elem = 999

>>> print c1.static_elem, c1.object_elem
999 456
>>> print c2.static_elem, c2.object_elem
999 456

# Now, let's try changing the object element
c1.object_elem = 888

>>> print c1.static_elem, c1.object_elem
999 888
>>> print c2.static_elem, c2.object_elem
999 456

As you can see, when we changed the class element, it changed for both objects. But, when we changed the object element, the other object remained unchanged.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    but being init always executed after the object is created, it becomes practically equal to define variables outside of init, right? – jeanc Jan 29 '12 at 21:33
  • 2
    If you change a class attribute (one defined outside __init__()) it changes for the whole class. It will change for other instances too whereas instance attributes (defined in __init__()) are specific to each instance. – nitsas Jan 29 '12 at 21:46
  • 49
    Not totally accurate: static_elm changes for all class instances when assigned to via the class (MyClass.static_element = X), as shown. But when assigned to via a class instance, then, for that instance, static_elm will become an instance member. If you do: c1.static_elem = 666, then print c1.static_elem, c2.static_elem will produce 666, 999. From within the class, self.static_elm returns MyClass.static_elm until assigned self.static_elm = X. Then, a new self.static_elm is created, obscuring the class variable (still reachable through MyClass.static_elm) – Lobotomik Mar 8 '17 at 11:02
  • 2
    Lobotomik made a clear explanation. Yes, that's a strange design on Python, it's very easy to confuse on this feature designed in Python, because the class element could be suddenly changed to be an instance's element. – Clock ZHONG Apr 27 '18 at 10:57
  • 2
    @Lobotomik: I believe it is only "shadowing" the class variable, since you can still access the unmodified class variable via c1.__class__.static_elem. Your words "static_elm will become an instance member" are understood by me in the sense that static_elem will change from class variable to instance variable. This is not the case. – gebbissimo Jan 28 '19 at 10:04
15

I think this sample explains the difference between the styles:

james@bodacious-wired:~$cat test.py 
#!/usr/bin/env python

class MyClass:
    element1 = "Hello"

    def __init__(self):
        self.element2 = "World"

obj = MyClass()

print dir(MyClass)
print "--"
print dir(obj)
print "--"
print obj.element1 
print obj.element2
print MyClass.element1 + " " + MyClass.element2
james@bodacious-wired:~$./test.py 
['__doc__', '__init__', '__module__', 'element1']
--
['__doc__', '__init__', '__module__', 'element1', 'element2']
--
Hello World
Hello
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "./test.py", line 17, in <module>
    print MyClass.element2
AttributeError: class MyClass has no attribute 'element2'

element1 is bound to the class, element2 is bound to an instance of the class.

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