12

I have a List<System.Threading.Timer>. Each Timer fires at a configurable interval (default 10 minutes). All call the same callback method (with a different parameter). The callback method can take several seconds to complete it's work.

When the program terminates, it looks like execution of the callback method is immediately halted (am I seeing that correctly?).

How can I elegantly wait for any currently-executing callback methods to complete before exiting the program?

1

4 Answers 4

17

You can Dispose all timers with WaitHandler parameter. This handler will be signaled only when callback method is completed (as spec says: "The timer is not disposed until all currently queued callbacks have completed.")

void WaitUntilCompleted(List<Timer> myTimers)
{
    List<WaitHandle> waitHnd = new List<WaitHandle>();
    foreach (var timer in myTimers)
    {
        WaitHandle h = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        if(!timer.Dispose(h)) throw new Exception("Timer already disposed.");
        waitHnd.Add(h);
    }
    WaitHandle.WaitAll(waitHnd.ToArray());
}

Edit: @Peter underlined importance of the Dispose method return value. It returns false when timer already disposed. To make sure this solutions stays reliable, I modified it to throw exception when Timer already disposed as we can't control in such case when its callback finishes, despite earlier disposal callback might still be running!

1
  • 1
    I just tested this and @Peter is right: you can get a deadlock if you dispose multiple times. His answer is the correct one. Commented Jan 19, 2017 at 16:04
6

The accepted answer from Tomek is nice, but incomplete. If the Dispose function returns false, it means that there is no need to wait for completion, as the thread is already finished. If you make an attempt to wait on a WaitHandle in such a case, WaitAll will never return, so you created yourself a function that arbitrarily freezes your application/thread.

Here is how it should look:

    void WaitUntilCompleted(List<Timer> myTimers)
    {
        List<WaitHandle> waitHnd = new List<WaitHandle>();
        foreach (var timer in myTimers)
        {
            WaitHandle h = new AutoResetEvent(false);
            if (timer.Dispose(h))
            {
                waitHnd.Add(h);
            }
        }
        WaitHandle.WaitAll(waitHnd.ToArray());
    }
2
  • 1
    Disagree, Dispose will return false only if called more than one time on the Timer. The fact that Timer's callback finished doesn't affect Dispose return value.
    – Tomek
    Commented Jan 20, 2017 at 13:54
  • You have to make sure the callback hasn't already fired, if it's a single shot timer, as you will end up waiting forever. Commented Aug 22, 2017 at 9:51
1

You could use ManualResetEvents to block the main thread until any pending operations have completed.

for example if you would like all timers to execute at least once then you could have an System.Threading.ManualResetEvent[] array with the initial state set to non-signalled

So somewhere in your code you would have your timer setup and it's associated waithandle initialised.

// in main setup method.. 
int frequencyInMs = 600000; //10 mins 
Timer timer = new Timer();
timer.Elapsed += (s, e) => MyExecute();
myTimers.Add(timer) 

ManualResetEvent[] _waithandles = new ManualResetEvent[10];
_waithandles[0] = new ManualResetEvent(false);

// Other timers ... 
timer = new Timer();
timer.Elapsed += (s, e) => MyOtherExecute();
myTimers.Add(timer)         
_waithandles[1] = new ManualResetEvent(false);
// etc, and so on for all timers 

// then in each method that gets executed by the timer
// simply set ManualReset event to signalled that will unblock it. 
private void MyExecute() 
{
    // do all my logic then when done signal the manual reset event 
    _waithandles[0].Set(); 
}

// In your main before exiting, this will cause the main thread to wait
// until all ManualResetEvents are set to signalled  
WaitHandle.WaitAll(_waithandles);    

If you only wanted to wait for pending operations to finish then simply modify to something like this:

_waithandles[0] = new ManualResetEvent(true); // initial state set to non blocking. 

private void MyExecute() 
{
    _waithandles[0].Reset(); // set this waithandle to block.. 

    // do all my logic then when done signal the manual reset event 
    _waithandles[0].Set(); 
}
-2

It's probably not possible to wait for exit in console application.

For windows forms application:

You can create a static running callback counter variable which will be increased each time the callback is started and decreased on exit. Of course, you should use lock when doing this.

And then you can check the corresponding event and whether wait for a counter to become 0 or just to cancel the exit.

2
  • indeed, it is ;-) msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/…
    – Seb
    Commented Jan 30, 2012 at 12:25
  • Tomek's solution works fine in a Console App. Your solution would work in a console app too. The app would have to poll the counter waiting for it to reach 0 before Main exits.
    – Eric J.
    Commented Jan 30, 2012 at 18:26

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