87

I need to combine two string sets while filtering out redundant information, this is the solution I came up with, is there a better way that anyone can suggest? Perhaps something built in that I overlooked? Didn't have any luck with google.

Set<String> oldStringSet = getOldStringSet();
Set<String> newStringSet = getNewStringSet();

for(String currentString : oldStringSet)
{
    if (!newStringSet.contains(currentString))
    {
        newStringSet.add(currentString);
    }
}

12 Answers 12

114

Since a Set does not contain duplicate entries, you can therefore combine the two by:

newStringSet.addAll(oldStringSet);

It does not matter if you add things twice, the set will only contain the element once... e.g it's no need to check using contains method.

| improve this answer | |
84

You can do it using this one-liner

Set<String> combined = Stream.concat(newStringSet.stream(), oldStringSet.stream())
        .collect(Collectors.toSet());

With a static import it looks even nicer

Set<String> combined = concat(newStringSet.stream(), oldStringSet.stream())
        .collect(toSet());

Another way is to use flatMap method:

Set<String> combined = Stream.of(newStringSet, oldStringSet).flatMap(Set::stream)
        .collect(toSet());

Also any collection could easily be combined with a single element

Set<String> combined = concat(newStringSet.stream(), Stream.of(singleValue))
        .collect(toSet());
| improve this answer | |
  • how is this better than addAll? – KKlalala Feb 1 '18 at 22:11
  • 7
    @KKlalala, your requirements will determine which is better. The main difference between addAll and using Streams is: • using set1.addAll(set2) will have the side effect of physically changing the contents of set1. • However, using Streams will always result in a new instance of Set containing the contents of both sets without modifying either of the original Set instances. IMHO this answer is better because it avoids side-effects and potential for unexpected changes to the original set if it were to be used elsewhere whilst expecting the original contents. HTH – edwardsmatt Jun 26 '18 at 2:53
  • 1
    This also has the advantage of supporting Immutable Sets. See: docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/… – edwardsmatt Jun 26 '18 at 3:12
32

The same with Guava:

Set<String> combinedSet = Sets.union(oldStringSet, newStringSet)
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Sets::union is a great BinaryOperator to use with Collectors.reducing(). – mskfisher Mar 6 '19 at 18:36
12

From the definition Set contain only unique elements.

Set<String> distinct = new HashSet<String>(); 
 distinct.addAll(oldStringSet);
 distinct.addAll(newStringSet);

To enhance your code you may create a generic method for that

public static <T> Set<T> distinct(Collection<T>... lists) {
    Set<T> distinct = new HashSet<T>();

    for(Collection<T> list : lists) {
        distinct.addAll(list);
    }
    return distinct;
}
| improve this answer | |
5

If you are using Guava you can also use a builder to get more flexibility:

ImmutableSet.<String>builder().addAll(someSet)
                              .addAll(anotherSet)
                              .add("A single string")
                              .build();
| improve this answer | |
4

Just use newStringSet.addAll(oldStringSet). No need to check for duplicates as the Set implementation does this already.

| improve this answer | |
3

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/Set.html#addAll(java.util.Collection)

Since sets can't have duplicates, just adding all the elements of one to the other generates the correct union of the two.

| improve this answer | |
3
 newStringSet.addAll(oldStringSet);

This will produce Union of s1 and s2

| improve this answer | |
2

Use boolean addAll(Collection<? extends E> c)
Adds all of the elements in the specified collection to this set if they're not already present (optional operation). If the specified collection is also a set, the addAll operation effectively modifies this set so that its value is the union of the two sets. The behavior of this operation is undefined if the specified collection is modified while the operation is in progress.

newStringSet.addAll(oldStringSet)
| improve this answer | |
2

If you care about performance, and if you don't need to keep your two sets and one of them can be huge, I would suggest to check which set is the largest and add the elements from the smallest.

Set<String> newStringSet = getNewStringSet();
Set<String> oldStringSet = getOldStringSet();

Set<String> myResult;
if(oldStringSet.size() > newStringSet.size()){
    oldStringSet.addAll(newStringSet);
    myResult = oldStringSet;
} else{
    newStringSet.addAll(oldStringSet);
    myResult = newStringSet;
}

In this way, if your new set has 10 elements and your old set has 100 000, you only do 10 operations instead of 100 000.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is a very good logic that I can not imagine why this is not in the main addAll method parametter, like public boolean addAll(int index, Collection<? extends E> c, boolean checkSizes) – Gaspar Apr 26 '19 at 14:46
  • I guess because of the specification itself : Adds all of the elements in the specified collection to this collection. You could have another method indeed but it would be quite confusing if it doesn't follow the same specification than the methods it overloads. – Ricola Apr 26 '19 at 22:23
  • Yes, I was saying other method overloading that one – Gaspar Apr 29 '19 at 11:22
2
Set.addAll()

Adds all of the elements in the specified collection to this set if they're not already present (optional operation). If the specified collection is also a set, the addAll operation effectively modifies this set so that its value is the union of the two sets

newStringSet.addAll(oldStringSet)
| improve this answer | |
1

If you are using the Apache Common, use SetUtils class from org.apache.commons.collections4.SetUtils;

SetUtils.union(setA, setB);
| improve this answer | |
  • Note this returns a SetView, which is immutable. – jaco0646 Jun 2 at 22:08

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