16

I have got List<Object> where the Object has a lot of childs List<Object> around 4-6 levels.

Now I have to bind it to WPF TreeView... :(

Which the best way to convert it into ObservableCollection<Object> is?

2
  • 1
    Why not just make them ObservableCollection<object> in the first place? When working with WPF, its important to get the data layer right, and if you're ever displaying a list that can change in the UI, you should always use an ObservableCollection instead of a List
    – Rachel
    Jan 30, 2012 at 19:32
  • @Rachel Correct. The first place is RIA Services. I don't know if it is possible to do it...
    – Terminador
    Jan 30, 2012 at 19:35

6 Answers 6

20

Assuming you mean ObservableCollection<T>, if you wanted the List directly to the ObservableCollection as-is, just use the constructor:

var oc = new ObservableCollection<Object>(yourListOfObject);

Now, if you're wanting to unwind each of those, you would need to do some work to collapse them into a single ObservableCollection<T>.

2
  • If I created a public class called Computer and have a public string Name getter-setter inside there for my OC, and then I have a List<string> lstComputers, it tells me I cannot convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.List<string>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<MyProject.MainWindow.Computer>'.
    – vapcguy
    Jan 18, 2017 at 22:54
  • Actually I found out how to do it. You can't have mismatched types.
    – vapcguy
    Jan 18, 2017 at 23:54
4

One part of the answer is to use Reactive Extensions (Rx). You can get it from NuGet and it's developed by Microsoft. With the help of it you can simply say: myListCollection.ToObservable();

If your child collections always are in a node with the same name you could use a while(item.Collection != null || item.Collection.Count == 0) and put the ToObservable() within the loop

1
  • 1
    This is such a overkill Aug 24, 2016 at 0:51
3

I assume you're talking about ObservableCollection. To answer simply, you can use the ctor:

List<Object> myList = GetList();
new ObservableCollection<Object>(myList);

However, I think there is some work left to be done in terms of organizing your information hierarchically.

2
3

Assuming you have a node class defined like so:

public class Node
{
    public ICollection<Node> Children { get; set; }
}

You can use recursion to convert List<Node> collections, at any level of depth:

public static ObservableCollection<Node> ToObservableRecursive(ICollection<Node> nodes)
{
    foreach (Node node in nodes)
        if (node.Children != null)
            node.Children = ToObservableRecursive(node.Children);

    return new ObservableCollection<Node>(nodes);
}
2
  • If I created a public class called Computer and have a public string Name getter-setter inside there for my OC, and then I have a List<string> lstComputers, it tells me I cannot convert from 'System.Collections.Generic.List<string>' to 'System.Collections.Generic.List<MyProject.MainWindow.Comput‌​er>'
    – vapcguy
    Jan 18, 2017 at 23:00
  • Actually I found out how to do it. You can't have mismatched types.
    – vapcguy
    Jan 18, 2017 at 23:54
1

Do you mean ObservableCollection? If you want the child level Lists to be observable also then you will need to traverse the tree and change items as necessary or add each item separately to begin with.

1

You cannot do any of the solutions listed here until your types are the same! If your list or ICollection or IEnumerable is of type string, for example, but your ObservableCollection needs to be of type Nodes or Computers or something else, you have to get the List into that type, first! I wasted so much time on these other bogus, simplified "solutions" that are NOT solutions because they do not explain this or take this factor into account.

Say this is your ObservableCollection:

public class Computer
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Pretty standard, right? You'd probably end up replacing Computer with any number of things in any number of projects.

If you then get a list of computer names in a List<string> called lstComputers, you CANNOT just convert that using:

var oc = new ObservableCollection<Computer>(lstComputers);

It will say your types are mismatched and cannot be converted from one to the other because you are trying to shove a List<string> into an ObservableCollection<Computer>. Square peg in a round hole.

Instead, in your function for getting the computer names, you have to add them all "special-like":

public static List<Computer> NetworkComputers()
{
    List<Computer> lstComputers = new List<Computer>();
    DirectoryEntry root = new DirectoryEntry("WinNT:");
    foreach (DirectoryEntry computers in root.Children)
    {
        foreach (DirectoryEntry computer in computers.Children)
        {
            if (computer.Name != "Schema" && computer.SchemaClassName == "Computer")
            {
                lstComputers.Add(new Computer() { Name = computer.Name });
            }
        }
    } 
}

Only because we used that line lstComputers.Add(new Computer() { Name = computer.Name }); and are returning the List<Computer> and not List<string> can we now put it into our ObservableCollection<Computer>.

If you missed the boat and can't do it like this from the start, this thread talks about other ways you might be able to do your conversion: convert a list of objects from one type to another using lambda expression

So once you have it in a List<Computer>, only then you can do:

List<Computer> lstComputers = NetworkComputers();
var oc = new ObservableCollection<Computer>(lstComputers);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.