4

Solution: Thanks to everyone who commented on this issue, but I resolved it on another forum, and figured I would post the answer here for anybody having the same issue.

So, I guess only dynamic libraries make use of __declspec(dllexport), so when you try to create a static library, the methods are exported (an the names need to be mangled to be c++ compatible), so when declaring extern "C" __declspec.... you end up with method names that aren't recognized when trying to link statically.

So, simple fix.....remove the __declspec

I have 2 projects, one is a static library, the other is just a win32 application.

I simply want to include the library I've created into my win32 application, however g++ keeps giving me this error:

../MyLib/TestClass.h:16: undefined reference to `imp__ZTV9TestClass'

That is the error I get when trying to compile the application, even though that file is part of the library.

I have attempted to create the most simplified version of this project as possible in an attempt to find the error.

Here are the source files for both projects:

MyLib.h - This is the main include file for clients to reference functions in the library

#ifndef MYLIB_H
#define MYLIB_H

#include "libexport.h"
#include "TestClass.h"

#endif  /* MYLIB_H */

libexport.h - Pretty generic file to define import/export keywords

#ifndef LIBEXPORT_H
#define LIBEXPORT_H

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

#ifdef LIB
#define DLL_EXPORT __declspec(dllexport)
#else
#define DLL_EXPORT __declspec(dllimport)
#endif

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

#endif  /* LIBEXPORT_H */

TestClass.h

#ifndef TESTCLASS_H
#define TESTCLASS_H

#include "libexport.h"

class DLL_EXPORT TestClass
{
public:
    TestClass() {};
    virtual ~TestClass() {};

    void TestFunc();
};

#endif  /* TESTCLASS_H */

TestClass.cpp

#define LIB

#include <stdio.h>
#include "TestClass.h"

void TestClass::TestFunc()
{
    printf("This function was called from within the library.\n");
}

And lastly, the win32 application that implements the library:

Main.cpp

#include <windows.h>
#include "../MyLib/MyLib.h"

#pragma comment(lib, "libmylib.a")

int __stdcall WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance,
                      HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
                      LPSTR lpCmdLine,
                      int nCmdShow)
{

    TestClass *myClass = new TestClass();

    delete myClass;
    myClass = 0;

    return 0;
}

The library compiles with no errors, however, here is the output when compiling the main application:

g++.exe    -c -g -MMD -MP -MF build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o.d -o build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o main.cpp
mkdir -p dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows
g++.exe     -mwindows -o dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows/testclient build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o -L../MyLib/dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows -lmylib 
build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o: In function `TestClass':
C:\Users\Nick\Documents\NetBeansProjects\TestClient/../MyLib/TestClass.h:16: undefined reference to `_imp___ZTV9TestClass'
make[2]: Leaving directory `/c/Users/Nick/Documents/NetBeansProjects/TestClient'
build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o: In function `~TestClass':
make[1]: Leaving directory `/c/Users/Nick/Documents/NetBeansProjects/TestClient'
C:\Users\Nick\Documents\NetBeansProjects\TestClient/../MyLib/TestClass.h:17: undefined reference to `_imp___ZTV9TestClass'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
make[2]: *** [dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows/testclient.exe] Error 1
make[1]: *** [.build-conf] Error 2
make: *** [.build-impl] Error 2


BUILD FAILED (exit value 2, total time: 1s)

Most of the other posts I've seen regarding this topic say that the problem lies in the linking order, but even after adding -lmylib to the beginning of the compiler build line, the same errors persist:

g++.exe -lmylib -mwindows -o dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows/testclient build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o -L../MyLib/dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows -lmylib 
build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o: In function `TestClass':
C:\Users\Nick\Documents\NetBeansProjects\TestClient/../MyLib/TestClass.h:16: undefined reference to `_imp___ZTV9TestClass'

I really need help on this, I've built many dynamic libraries before using the above code, and it works with no problems, I can't understand why I'm having so much trouble building a simple static library. Any help is greatly appreciated.

  • 1
    It's a static library, so try just libmylib.a (with no -l) instead of -lmylib. You might have to specify the full path: build/Debug/libmylib.a or whatever. – TonyK Jan 31 '12 at 11:17
  • It looks like that produces the same thing: g++.exe -mwindows ../MyLib/dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows/libmylib.a -o dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows/testclient build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o -L../MyLib/dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows -lmylib make[2]: Leaving directory /c/Users/Nick/Documents/NetBeansProjects/TestClient' make[1]: Leaving directory /c/Users/Nick/Documents/NetBeansProjects/TestClient' build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o: In function TestClass': C:\Users\Nick\Documents\NetBeansProjects\TestClient/../MyLib/TestClass.h:16: undefined reference to _imp___ZTV9TestClass' – DivXZero Jan 31 '12 at 11:22
  • 1
    the order of linking objects and ar archives is important too – PlasmaHH Jan 31 '12 at 11:32
  • nos, it IS at the end, I simply stated that I tried it at the beginning with no new results, it helps if you look at the information provided. – DivXZero Jan 31 '12 at 11:38
  • Put ../MyLib/dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows/libmylib.a after build/Debug/MinGW-Windows/main.o. – TonyK Jan 31 '12 at 11:40
2

-L/path/to/library/ and -lName as g++ options worked for me. Do not specify the library name in the path/to/library .

  • That's exactly how I specified it in the given example... "-L../MyLib/dist/Debug/MinGW-Windows -lmylib" but it still gives the undefined reference error, that's why i'm confused – DivXZero Jan 31 '12 at 14:01
  • 1
    Oh, sorry, must have missed it. Is mylib named libmylib.a ? Because thats what the -l option assumes it to be. – TeaOverflow Jan 31 '12 at 14:38
1

Try putting -L and -l before main.o in the linking command line.

  • Didn't make a difference, still getting the same undefined reference error – DivXZero Jan 31 '12 at 14:09
1

Solution: Thanks to everyone who commented on this issue, but I resolved it on another forum, and figured out I would post the answer here for anybody having the same issue.

So, I guess only dynamic libraries make use of __declspec(dllexport), so when you try to create a static library, the methods are exported (an the names need to be mangled to be C++ compatible), so when declaring extern "C" __declspec.... you end up with method names that aren't recognized when trying to link statically.

So, simple fix: remove the __declspec

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.