In the book Game Coding Complete, 3rd Edition, the author mentions a technique to both reduce data structure size and increase access performance. In essence it relies on the fact that you gain performance when member variables are memory aligned. This is an obvious potential optimization that compilers would take advantage of, but by making sure each variable is aligned they end up bloating the size of the data structure.

Or that was his claim at least.

The real performance increase, he states, is by using your brain and ensuring that your structure is properly designed to take take advantage of speed increases while preventing the compiler bloat. He provides the following code snippet:

#pragma pack( push, 1 )

struct SlowStruct
{
    char c;
    __int64 a;
    int b;
    char d;
};

struct FastStruct
{
    __int64 a;
    int b;
    char c;
    char d;  
    char unused[ 2 ]; // fill to 8-byte boundary for array use
};

#pragma pack( pop )

Using the above struct objects in an unspecified test he reports a performance increase of 15.6% (222ms compared to 192ms) and a smaller size for the FastStruct. This all makes sense on paper to me, but it fails to hold up under my testing:

enter image description here

Same time results and size (counting for the char unused[ 2 ])!

Now if the #pragma pack( push, 1 ) is isolated only to FastStruct (or removed completely) we do see a difference:

enter image description here

So, finally, here lies the question: Do modern compilers (VS2010 specifically) already optimize for the bit alignment, hence the lack of performance increase (but increase the structure size as a side-affect, like Mike Mcshaffry stated)? Or is my test not intensive enough/inconclusive to return any significant results?

For the tests I did a variety of tasks from math operations, column-major multi-dimensional array traversing/checking, matrix operations, etc. on the unaligned __int64 member. None of which produced different results for either structure.

In the end, even if their was no performance increase, this is still a useful tidbit to keep in mind for keeping memory usage to a minimum. But I would love it if there was a performance boost (no matter how minor) that I am just not seeing.

  • 4
    The fact that you get exactly the same time for all tests hints that you are not running long enough. The resolution of the timing code is probably not high enough to show any differences. – Bo Persson Jan 31 '12 at 20:51
  • 2
    Perhaps during your tests the variable in question was being used so much it was cached in a register. Having an int64 variable cross a memory boundary where it would require TWO assembly instructions to fetch it would necessarily be slower. – Steve Wellens Jan 31 '12 at 20:53
  • 1
    @BoPersson: More likely, the compiler simply optimized them to produce the same code. – Puppy Jan 31 '12 at 20:53
  • @Bo Persson Am using Boost::Chrono for time measurement, if that makes a difference. – ssell Jan 31 '12 at 20:54
  • 1
    To expand on @BoPersson's comment above, the fact that you get the same time to the microsecond, both case to case and run to run, is extremely suspicious. Your timing framework is flawed. – Russell Borogove Feb 1 '12 at 1:10
up vote 13 down vote accepted

It is highly dependent on the hardware.

Let me demonstrate:

#pragma pack( push, 1 )

struct SlowStruct
{
    char c;
    __int64 a;
    int b;
    char d;
};

struct FastStruct
{
    __int64 a;
    int b;
    char c;
    char d;  
    char unused[ 2 ]; // fill to 8-byte boundary for array use
};

#pragma pack( pop )

int main (void){

    int x = 1000;
    int iterations = 10000000;

    SlowStruct *slow = new SlowStruct[x];
    FastStruct *fast = new FastStruct[x];



    //  Warm the cache.
    memset(slow,0,x * sizeof(SlowStruct));
    clock_t time0 = clock();
    for (int c = 0; c < iterations; c++){
        for (int i = 0; i < x; i++){
            slow[i].a += c;
        }
    }
    clock_t time1 = clock();
    cout << "slow = " << (double)(time1 - time0) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << endl;

    //  Warm the cache.
    memset(fast,0,x * sizeof(FastStruct));
    time1 = clock();
    for (int c = 0; c < iterations; c++){
        for (int i = 0; i < x; i++){
            fast[i].a += c;
        }
    }
    clock_t time2 = clock();
    cout << "fast = " << (double)(time2 - time1) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC << endl;



    //  Print to avoid Dead Code Elimination
    __int64 sum = 0;
    for (int c = 0; c < x; c++){
        sum += slow[c].a;
        sum += fast[c].a;
    }
    cout << "sum = " << sum << endl;


    return 0;
}

Core i7 920 @ 3.5 GHz

slow = 4.578
fast = 4.434
sum = 99999990000000000

Okay, not much difference. But it's still consistent over multiple runs.
So the alignment makes a small difference on Nehalem Core i7.


Intel Xeon X5482 Harpertown @ 3.2 GHz (Core 2 - generation Xeon)

slow = 22.803
fast = 3.669
sum = 99999990000000000

Now take a look...

6.2x faster!!!


Conclusion:

You see the results. You decide whether or not it's worth your time to do these optimizations.


EDIT :

Same benchmarks but without the #pragma pack:

Core i7 920 @ 3.5 GHz

slow = 4.49
fast = 4.442
sum = 99999990000000000

Intel Xeon X5482 Harpertown @ 3.2 GHz

slow = 3.684
fast = 3.717
sum = 99999990000000000
  • The Core i7 numbers didn't change. Apparently it can handle misalignment without trouble for this benchmark.
  • The Core 2 Xeon now shows the same times for both versions. This confirms that misalignment is a problem on the Core 2 architecture.

Taken from my comment:

If you leave out the #pragma pack, the compiler will keep everything aligned so you don't see this issue. So this is actually an example of what could happen if you misuse #pragma pack.

  • Ah, a test that actually shows results! On my older work computer I received a 71% average performance increase over 100 tests. With the reduced size, and results such as these, it would be impossible to not do these optimizations, especially with how simple they are. – ssell Jan 31 '12 at 21:35
  • 6
    If you leave out the #pragma pack, the compiler will keep everything aligned so you don't see this issue. So this is actually an example of what could happen if you misuse #pragma pack. – Mysticial Jan 31 '12 at 21:35
  • Are you saying without #pragma pack you won't see the performance boost? My test from the previous comment was already without it. Using #pragma pack resulted in FastStruct actually performing slower on average by 50-200ms. EDIT After re-running the test, the results are the same as without #pragma pack. Not sure what that was about. – ssell Jan 31 '12 at 21:40
  • @ssell: Depends on whether you actually have a performance problem to begin with. There's no point packing this struct if you only make two of them, for example. – Puppy Jan 31 '12 at 21:42
  • I just reran the tests without the #pragma pack. The Core i7 numbers are the same. But the Core 2 Xeon results are 3.684 and 3.717. (FastStruct is slower.) I suspect this is because FastStruct is exactly 16 bytes - so the iteration-to-iteration stride could lead to cache-bank conflicts. – Mysticial Jan 31 '12 at 21:43

Such hand-optimizations are generally long dead. Alignment is only a serious consideration if you're packing for space, or if you have an enforced-alignment type like SSE types. The compiler's default alignment and packing rules are intentionally designed to maximize performance, obviously, and whilst hand-tuning them can be beneficial, it's not generally worth it.

Probably, in your test program, the compiler never stored any structure on the stack and just kept the members in registers, which do not have alignment, which means that it's fairly irrelevant what the structure size or alignment is.

Here's the thing: There can be aliasing and other nasties with sub-word accessing, and it's no slower to access a whole word than to access a sub-word. So in general, it's no more efficient, in time, to pack more tightly than word size if you're only accessing, say, one member.

  • So, in short, it is not worth the effort unless I absolutely need those extra few bytes? Also I did not think of the compiler simply keeping them in registers. – ssell Jan 31 '12 at 20:55
  • 3
    @ssell: Such optimizations are only becoming more, and more, common. And yes, it's not worth it in general. – Puppy Jan 31 '12 at 21:05

Visual Studio is a great compiler when it comes to optimization. However, bear in mind that the current "Optimization War" in game development is not on the PC arena. While such optimizations may quite well be dead on the PC, on the console platforms it's a completely different pair of shoes.

That said, you might want to repost this question on the specialized gamedev stackexchange site, you might get some answers directly from "the field".

Finally, your results are exactly the same up to the microsecond which is dead impossible on a modern multithreaded system -- I'm pretty sure you either use a very low resolution timer, or your timing code is broken.

  • 1
    For timing I am using Boost::Chrono and just subtracting system times. Since the authors results varied so greatly (30ms!) I did not anticipate needing anything more precise. Also, thank you for pointing out the fact about console programming. Sometimes I forget just how much they have to do to squeeze out everything they possibly can from these ancient systems. – ssell Jan 31 '12 at 21:03

Modern compilers align members on different byte boundaries depending on the size of the member. See the bottom of this.

Normally you really shouldn't care about structure padding but if you have an object that is going to have 1000000 instances or something the rule of the thumb is simply to order your members from biggest to smallest. I wouldn't recommend messing with the padding with #pragma directives.

The compiler is going to either optimize for size or speed and unless you explicitly tell it you wont know what you get. But if you follow the advice of that book you will win-win on most compilers. Put the biggest, aligned, things first in your struct then half size stuff, then single byte stuff if any, add some dummy variables to align. Using bytes for things that dont have to be can be a performance hit anyway, as a compromise use ints for everything (have to know the pros and cons of doing that)

The x86 has made for a lot of bad programmers and compilers because it allows unaligned accesses. Making it hard for many folks to move to other platforms (that are taking over). Although unaligned accesses work on an x86 you take a serious performance hit. Which is why it is important to know how compilers work both in general as well as the particular one you are using.

having caches, and as with the modern computer platforms relying on caches to get any kind of performance, you want to both be aligned and packed. The simple rule being taught gives you both...in general. It is very good advice. Adding compiler specific pragmas is not nearly as good, makes the code non-portable, and doesnt take much searching through SO or googling to find out how often the compiler ignores the pragma or doesnt do what you really wanted.

  • 1
    You only need dummy variables to align if you use #pragma pack to prevent the compiler from doing its job. If you write simply struct FastStruct { __int64 a; int b; char c; char d; }; without any #pragmas the compiler will align everything properly. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 31 '12 at 21:42
  • I talking generically. and specifically avoid pragmas, as a rule dont rely on them. – old_timer Jan 31 '12 at 21:56

On some platforms the compiler doesn't have an option: objects of types bigger than char often have strict requirements to be at a suitably aligned address. Typically the alignment requirements are identical to the size of the object up to the size of the biggest word supported by the CPU natively. That is short typically requires to be at an even address, long typically requires to be at an address divisible by 4, double at an address divisible by 8, and e.g. SIMD vectors at an address divisible by 16.

Since C and C++ require ordering of members in the order they are declared, the size of structures will differ quite a bit on the corresponding platforms. Since bigger structures effectively cause more cache misses, page misses, etc., there will be a substantial performance degradation when creating bigger structures.

Since I saw a claim that it doesn't matter: it matters on most (if not all) systems I'm using. There is a simple examples of showing different sizes. How much this affects the performance obviously depends on how the structures are to be used.

#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    char a;
    double b;
    char c;
    double d;
};

struct B
{
    double b;
    double d;
    char a;
    char c;
};

int main()
{
    std::cout << "sizeof(A) = " << sizeof(A) << "\n";
    std::cout << "sizeof(B) = " << sizeof(B) << "\n";
}

./alignment.tsk 
sizeof(A) = 32
sizeof(B) = 24

The C standard specifies that fields within a struct must be allocated at increasing addresses. A struct which has eight variables of type 'int8' and seven variables of type 'int64', stored in that order, will take 64 bytes (pretty much regardless of a machine's alignment requirements). If the fields were ordered 'int8', 'int64', 'int8', ... 'int64', 'int8', the struct would take 120 bytes on a platform where 'int64' fields are aligned on 8-byte boundaries. Reordering the fields yourself will allow them to be packed more tightly. Compilers, however, will not reorder fields within a struct absent explicit permission to do so, since doing so could change program semantics.

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