46

We are having some trouble designing our multi-threaded Entity Framework driven application and would like some guidance. We are creating entities on different threads, the entities are added to collections which are then data-bound to various WPF controls. The ObjectContext class is not thread-safe, so managing this we have essentially have 2 solutions:

Solution 1 has a single context and carefully use locking to ensure no 2 threads access it at the same time. This would be relatively simple to implement but would require the context to be alive for the duration of the application. Is it a bad idea to have a single context instance open like this?

Solution 2 is to create context objects on-demand and then detach the objects immediately, then hold them in our own collections, then re-attach them to do any updating. This has some serious problems for use though, as when the objects are detached they lose references to the navigation property objects. Also there is the problem that 2 threads could still try to access a single object, and both try to attach() it to a context. Also, we would need to supply a new context every time we wanted to access entities' navigation properties.

Q: Are either of the two solutions valid, if not how do you recommend we tackle this?

6
  • 2
    @usr you got a better idea? – Cocowalla Jul 5 '13 at 10:58
  • @Cocowalla not knowing the bigger scenario the OP is addressing, I don't. Both of his solutions will lead to a painful implementation which is why I'm warning him. Maybe he can take an entirely different path and use EF in a single-threaded way (the way it is meant to be used). – usr Jul 5 '13 at 11:56
  • Another thing to note: you CANNOT make any changes to an entity when it is detached, because no context is currently tracking that change. The change will not be persisted when SaveChanges() is later called. – JoeCool Jan 7 '15 at 16:38
  • Also, a sometimes useful hack (sort of) to note: if you do not explicitly call Detach(), then an entity will retain its navigation properties even after the context is disposed. Can prove useful :) – JoeCool Jan 7 '15 at 16:40
  • Two quick advice, 1 - Do it disconnected 2 - Stay away from LazyLoading – Hossein Shahdoost May 15 '16 at 10:44
27

First off, I'm assuming you have read the article "Multithreading and the Entity Framework" on MSDN.

Solution #1 is almost certainly the safest from a threading perspective, since you are guaranteeing that only one thread is interacting with the context at any give time. There is nothing inherently wrong with keeping the context around- it isn't keeping database connections open behind the scenes, so it's just memory overhead. This could, of course, present a performance problem if you end up bottlenecked on that thread and the whole application is written with single-db-thread assumptions.

Solution #2 seems unworkable to me- you'd end up with subtle bugs throughout the application where people forget to re-attach (or detach) entities.

One solution is to not use your entity objects in the UI layer of the application. I'd recommend this anyway- chances are, the structure/layout of the entity objects is not optimal for how you want to display things on your user interface (this is the reason for the family of MVC patterns). Your DAL should have methods which are business logic specific (UpdateCustomer for instance), and it should decide internally whether to create a new Context or use a stored one. You can start with the single stored context approach, and then if you run into bottleneck issues you have a limited surface area where you need to make changes.

The downside is that you need to write a lot more code- you'd have your EF entities, but you'd also have business entities that have duplicate properties and potentially differing cardinality of many of the EF entities. To mitigate this, you can use frameworks like AutoMapper to simplify copying properties from the EF entities to the business entities and back again.

3
  • 1
    Chris, thanks for the answer, it was very helpful in clarifying our thoughts. We are going to go with your recommendation, I think we had got a bit too carried away with trying to use our entity objects to do everything. – Martin Richards Feb 2 '12 at 9:16
  • 2
    Another issue with solution 1 is caching: the context will cache entities so data will get stale when it's modified outside the running instance of the application – Cocowalla Jul 5 '13 at 11:01
  • The link you provided shed a lot of light for me into how EF works. Thanks a lot. – Brandon Sep 14 '15 at 15:17
18

I have seem a dozen of stackoverflow threads concerning EF and multithreading. All of them have answers that explains the problem in depth but not really show you how to fix it.

EF is not thread safe, we all know that by now. But in my experience the only risk is the context creations/manipulations. There is actually a very simple fix for this where you can keep your lazy loading.

Lets say you have a WPF app and a MVC website. where the WPF app uses multihreading. You just dispose the db context in multithreading and keep it when not. Example a MVC website, the context will automaticly disposes after the view has been presented.

In the WPF application layer you use this:

ProductBLL productBLL = new ProductBLL(true);

In the MVC application layer you use this:

ProductBLL productBLL = new ProductBLL();

How your product business logic layer should look like:

public class ProductBLL : IProductBLL
{
    private ProductDAO productDAO; //Your DB layer

    public ProductBLL(): this(false)
    {

    }
    public ProductBLL(bool multiThreaded)
    {
        productDAO = new ProductDAO(multiThreaded);
    }
    public IEnumerable<Product> GetAll()
    {
        return productDAO.GetAll();
    }
    public Product GetById(int id)
    {
        return productDAO.GetById(id);
    }
    public Product Create(Product entity)
    {
        return productDAO.Create(entity);
    }
    //etc...
}

How your database logic layer should look like:

public class ProductDAO : IProductDAO
{
    private YOURDBCONTEXT db = new YOURDBCONTEXT ();
    private bool _MultiThreaded = false;

    public ProductDAO(bool multiThreaded)
    {
        _MultiThreaded = multiThreaded;
    }
    public IEnumerable<Product> GetAll()
    {
        if (_MultiThreaded)
        {
            using (YOURDBCONTEXT  db = new YOURDBCONTEXT ())
            {
                return db.Product.ToList(); //USE .Include() For extra stuff
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return db.Product.ToList();
        }                  
    }

    public Product GetById(int id)
    {
        if (_MultiThreaded)
        {
            using (YOURDBCONTEXT  db = new YOURDBCONTEXT ())
            {
                return db.Product.SingleOrDefault(x => x.ID == id); //USE .Include() For extra stuff
            }
        }
        else
        {
            return db.Product.SingleOrDefault(x => x.ID == id);
        }          
    }

    public Product Create(Product entity)
    {
        if (_MultiThreaded)
        {
            using (YOURDBCONTEXT  db = new YOURDBCONTEXT ())
            {
                db.Product.Add(entity);
                db.SaveChanges();
                return entity;
            }
        }
        else
        {
            db.Product.Add(entity);
            db.SaveChanges();
            return entity;
        }
    }

    //etc...
}
0

You do -not- want a long lived context. Ideally they should be for the life of a request/data operation.

When dealing with similar problems, I wound up implementing a repository that cached PK Entities for a given type, and allowed a 'LoadFromDetached' which would Find the entity in the database, and 'copy' all the scalar properties except PK over to the newly attached entity.

The performance will take a bit of a hit, but it provides a bullet proof way of making sure navigation properties don't get mangled by 'forgetting' about them.

1
  • I've recently bumped into similiar type of problem and ended up doing below which improved performance a lot. Typed into wrong place, see my answer – Otake Oct 12 '15 at 16:33
0

It has been sometime since the question asked but I've recently bumped into a similiar type of problem and ended up doing the below which helped us meeting the performance criteria.

You basically split your list into chunks and process them within sperate threads in a multi-threaded manner. Each new thread also initiates their own uow which requires your entities to be attached.

One thing to be aware of is your database needs to be enabled for snapshot isolation; otherwise you might end up with deadlocks. You would need to decide if this is ok for the operation you are doing and related business process. In our case it was a simple update on the product entity.

You would probably need to do some tests to decide on the best chunk size and also limit the parallelism so there is always resource to complete the operation.

    private void PersistProductChangesInParallel(List<Product> products, 
        Action<Product, string> productOperationFunc, 
        string updatedBy)
    {
        var productsInChunks = products.ChunkBy(20);

        Parallel.ForEach(
            productsInChunks,
            new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 20 },
            productsChunk =>
                {
                    try
                    {
                        using (var transactionScope = new TransactionScope(
                                TransactionScopeOption.Required,
                                new TransactionOptions { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.Snapshot }))
                        {
                            var dbContext = dbContextFactory.CreatedbContext();
                            foreach (var Product in productsChunk)
                            {
                                dbContext.products.Attach(Product);
                                productOperationFunc(Product, updatedBy);
                            }
                            dbContext.SaveChanges();
                            transactionScope.Complete();
                        }
                    }
                    catch (Exception e)
                    {
                        Log.Error(e);
                        throw new ApplicationException("Some products might not be updated", e);
                    }
                });
    }
0

I'm using Blazor Server Side with DbContext.

I've actually done your second way, and it's been working alright. Be careful of untracked entities.

A DbContext that is scope lived which is an interface that implements IReadOnlyApplicationDbContext that only provides the IQueryable for the DbSets (no SaveChanges or anything like that). So all read operations are safely executed without having the problem of an update messing around with the data.

Also, all queries use "AsNoTracking" to prevent saving tracks of the last query in cache.

After that, all write/update/delete updates are made by unique DbContexts.

It became something like that:

public interface IReadOnlyApplicationDbContext
{
    DbSet<Product> Products { get; }
}

public interface IApplicationDbContext : IReadOnlyDbContext
{
    DbSet<Product> Products { set; }
}

public class ApplicationDbContext : DbContext, IApplicationDbContext
{
    DbSet<Product> Products { get; set; }
}

public abstract class ProductRepository
{
    private readonly IReadOnlyApplicationDbContext _readOnlyApplicationDbContext;
    private readonly IFactory<IApplicationDbContext> _applicationDbContextFactory;
    
    protected Repository(
        IReadOnlyApplicationDbContext readOnlyApplicationDbContext,
        IFactory<IApplicationDbContext> applicationDbContextFactory
    )
    {
        _readOnlyApplicationDbContext = readOnlyApplicationDbContext;
        _applicationDbContextFactory = _applicationDbContextFactory;
    }
    
    private IQueryable<Product> ReadOnlyQuery() => _readOnlyApplicationDbContext.AsNoTracking();
    
    public Task<IEnumerable<Products>> Get()
    {
        return ReadOnlyQuery().Where(s=>s.SKU == "... some data ...");
    }
    
    public Task Update(Product product)
    {
        using (var db = _applicationDbContextFactory.Create())
        {
            db.Entity(product).State = EntityState.Modified;
            return db.SaveChangesAsync();
        }
    }
    
    public Task Add(Product product)
    {
        using (var db = _applicationDbContextFactory.Create())
        {
            db.Products.AddAsync(product);
            return db.SaveChangesAsync();
        }
    }
}
-1

I've just had a project where trying to use EF with multi threading caused errors.

I tried

using (var context = new entFLP(entity_connection))            
{
    context.Product.Add(entity);
    context.SaveChanges();
    return entity;
}

but it just changed the type of the error from datareader error to multiple thread error.

The simple solution was to use stored procedures with EF function imports

using (var context = new entFLP(entity_connection))
{
    context.fi_ProductAdd(params etc);
}

The key is to go to the source of the data and avoid the data model.

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