43

How can I update a record against specific id in LINQ to SQL?

55

LINQ is a query tool (Q = Query) - so there is no magic LINQ way to update just the single row, except through the (object-oriented) data-context (in the case of LINQ-to-SQL). To update data, you need to fetch it out, update the record, and submit the changes:

using(var ctx = new FooContext()) {
    var obj = ctx.Bars.Single(x=>x.Id == id);
    obj.SomeProp = 123;
    ctx.SubmitChanges();
}

Or write an SP that does the same in TSQL, and expose the SP through the data-context:

using(var ctx = new FooContext()) {
    ctx.UpdateBar(id, 123);
}
  • @Mathieu - do you propose that it guesses values for the 200 properties? they need to come from somewhere... – Marc Gravell Apr 4 '11 at 21:37
  • Sorry, I had something in mind that is not shown here, my bad. – Mathieu Apr 4 '11 at 22:28
  • excellent example of update. thanks friend – Shortys Oberto Dutari Oct 5 '12 at 20:47
19
public bool UpdateCustomerIno(CustomerInfo toUpdate)
{
    bool successfullySaved = false;

    var db = new DataClasses1DataContext();
    try
    {
        var dbCstInfo = db.CustomerInfos
            .Where(w => w.CustomerID == toUpdate.CustomerID)
            .SingleOrDefault();

        if (dbCstInfo != null)
        {
            dbCstInfo.FirstName = toUpdate.FirstName;
            dbCstInfo.LastName = toUpdate.LastName;
            db.SubmitChanges();
            successfullySaved = true;
        }
    }
    catch {
        successfullySaved = false;
    }
    return successfullySaved;
}
  • 7
    Not an issue here (since it is a new data-context), but there is a bug in DataContext that makes it more efficient to use (for identity lookups) SingleODefault(predicate) than Where(predicate).SingleOrDefault(). Also; if it fails, why wouldn't you let it throw an exception? Oh, and it is IDisposable. – Marc Gravell May 26 '09 at 10:30
8

Update

NorthwindDataContext db = new NorthwindDataContext();

Product product = db.Products.Single(p => p.ProductName == "Toy 1");

product.UnitPrice = 99;
product.UnitsInStock = 5;

db.SubmitChanges(); 

Insert

Dim db As New NorthwindDataContext

' Create New category and Products
Dim category As New Category
category.CategoryName = "Scott's Toys"

Dim product1 As New Product
category.ProductName = "Toy 1"

Dim product2 As New Product
category.ProductName = "Toy 2"
  • 5
    Why the hassle with the images, it's more useful and certainly better searchable to use the code layout feature – Sander Rijken May 26 '09 at 10:55
  • 1
    these are from scott gu's blog – sabbour May 19 '10 at 7:38
  • 1
    yes u are correct. these are from there.. – Waheed May 19 '10 at 10:39
  • 2
    Because I'm a coder, and borderline OCD, I converted the images into actual text for future viewers (this was the first SO result I got when looking up LINQ UPDATE) – TravisO Jun 21 '13 at 19:44
5

In the absence of more detailed info:

using(var dbContext = new dbDataContext())
{
    var data = dbContext.SomeTable.SingleOrDefault(row => row.id == requiredId);
    if(data != null)
    {
        data.SomeField = newValue;
    }
    dbContext.SubmitChanges();
}
  • That won't compile; Where(pred) will return an IQueryable<SomeType>, not a SomeType – Marc Gravell May 26 '09 at 10:26
  • oops. My bad. Corrected. – spender May 26 '09 at 10:33
  • 2
    You can use the Single(pred) instead of Where(pred).FirstOrDefault()... – Arjan Einbu May 26 '09 at 10:35
  • You live and learn. Cheers. – spender May 26 '09 at 10:40
  • This worked for me where the top answer (currently) did not. +1 because this is a more simply coded easy to understand / modify example – Brad May 19 '17 at 13:30
2
AdventureWorksDataContext db = new AdventureWorksDataContext();
db.Log = Console.Out;

// Get hte first customer record
Customer c = from cust in db.Customers select cust where id = 5;
Console.WriteLine(c.CustomerType);
c.CustomerType = 'I';
db.SubmitChanges(); // Save the changes away
2
 DataClassesDataContext dc = new DataClassesDataContext();

 FamilyDetail fd = dc.FamilyDetails.Single(p => p.UserId == 1);

 fd.FatherName=txtFatherName.Text;
        fd.FatherMobile=txtMobile.Text;
        fd.FatherOccupation=txtFatherOccu.Text;
        fd.MotherName=txtMotherName.Text;
        fd.MotherOccupation=txtMotherOccu.Text;
        fd.Phone=txtPhoneNo.Text;
        fd.Address=txtAddress.Text;
        fd.GuardianName=txtGardianName.Text;

        dc.SubmitChanges();
0

I found a workaround a week ago. You can use direct commands with "ExecuteCommand":

MDataContext dc = new MDataContext();
var flag = (from f in dc.Flags
                   where f.Code == Code
                   select f).First();
_refresh = Convert.ToBoolean(flagRefresh.Value);
if (_refresh)
{
    dc.ExecuteCommand("update Flags set value = 0 where code = {0}", Code);
}

In the ExecuteCommand statement, you can send the query directly, with the value for the specific record you want to update.

value = 0 --> 0 is the new value for the record;

code = {0} --> is the field where you will send the filter value;

Code --> is the new value for the field;

I hope this reference helps.

  • 2
    Why use ExecuteCommand to update!!? Seems a little strange to do that when you can simply update the object and call SubmitChanges. – DazManCat Nov 23 '11 at 10:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy