17

I am trying to take a decimal and convert it so that I can echo it as hours, minutes, and seconds.

I have the hours and minutes, but am breaking my brain trying to find the seconds. Been googling for awhile with no luck. I'm sure it is quite simple, but nothing I have tried has worked. Any advice is appreciated!

Here is what I have:

function convertTime($dec)
{
    $hour = floor($dec);
    $min = round(60*($dec - $hour));
}

Like I said, I get the hour and minute without issue. Just struggling to get seconds for some reason.

Thanks!

8
  • In what format is that "decimal"? Feb 1, 2012 at 20:20
  • what you have doesn't seem right also. Can you provide a sample input and expected output ?
    – Sorin
    Feb 1, 2012 at 20:22
  • The decimal is nothing special. Something like 5.67891234.
    – HMFlol
    Feb 1, 2012 at 20:23
  • possible duplicate of How to Convert decimal number to time or vice versa
    – Gordon
    Feb 1, 2012 at 20:24
  • Also, the output is expected to just be a number for hour, a number for min, and a number for sec that I can then use to print a HTML page.
    – HMFlol
    Feb 1, 2012 at 20:24

5 Answers 5

26

If $dec is in hours ($dec since the asker specifically mentioned a decimal):

function convertTime($dec)
{
    // start by converting to seconds
    $seconds = ($dec * 3600);
    // we're given hours, so let's get those the easy way
    $hours = floor($dec);
    // since we've "calculated" hours, let's remove them from the seconds variable
    $seconds -= $hours * 3600;
    // calculate minutes left
    $minutes = floor($seconds / 60);
    // remove those from seconds as well
    $seconds -= $minutes * 60;
    // return the time formatted HH:MM:SS
    return lz($hours).":".lz($minutes).":".lz($seconds);
}

// lz = leading zero
function lz($num)
{
    return (strlen($num) < 2) ? "0{$num}" : $num;
}
5
  • Thanks for the help. That makes more sense than what I was trying to do. :)
    – HMFlol
    Feb 1, 2012 at 20:43
  • 4
    Instead of creating the lz function, you can use the native str_pad function, from PHP: str_pad($num, 2, 0, STR_PAD_LEFT) Sep 8, 2013 at 18:53
  • @elboletaire Very true, I just happened to rip this out of some old, old class of mine.
    – WWW
    Sep 9, 2013 at 13:41
  • Just a note: I don't agree with the community edit made adding the explicit (int) cast to that first line of the convertTime() function. The edit note said something about casting $dec as an (int) for rounding - if you want to round off the seconds, just use round() in the appropriate place.
    – WWW
    Jan 21, 2014 at 15:44
  • 2
    In fact, since the asker specifically asked about a decimal, I removed the (int) cast. Doesn't make much sense to truncate the hours variable and yet still do minute and second calculations (since if you round the hours variable, there won't be any minutes or seconds!)
    – WWW
    Jun 25, 2015 at 17:00
16

Very simple solution in one line:

echo gmdate('H:i:s', floor(5.67891234 * 3600));
6
  • @Crontab Did not think about it :) Thanks.
    – Cheery
    Feb 1, 2012 at 20:44
  • 3
    Does it matter if you use date() instead of gmdate()?
    – Staysee
    Dec 4, 2014 at 15:55
  • @Staysee decimal time, as timestamp, as I think, defined in UTC timezone. Otherwise it will be shifted to the server's timezone and you may never get, for example, 0 and so on.
    – Cheery
    Dec 4, 2014 at 18:47
  • 1
    @sabertabatabaeeyazdi like this, for example $time = strtotime('17:30') - strtotime('midnight'); echo $time / 3600;
    – Cheery
    May 20, 2019 at 22:34
  • 3
    Caution: If you had a number of hours greater than one day in decimal (e.g. a stopwatch) and wanted hours:minutes this would loop round as it will never read more than 24. Dec 15, 2020 at 14:52
5

Everything upvoted didnt work in my case. I have used that solution to convert decimal hours and minutes to normal time format. i.e.

function clockalize($in){

    $h = intval($in);
    $m = round((((($in - $h) / 100.0) * 60.0) * 100), 0);
    if ($m == 60)
    {
        $h++;
        $m = 0;
    }
    $retval = sprintf("%02d:%02d", $h, $m);
    return $retval;
}


clockalize("17.5"); // 17:30
1
1

This is a great way and avoids problems with floating point precision:

function convertTime($h) {
    return [floor($h), (floor($h * 60) % 60), floor($h * 3600) % 60];
}
0

I am not sure if this is the best way to do this, but

$variabletocutcomputation = 60 * ($dec - $hour);
$min = round($variabletocutcomputation);
$sec = round((60*($variabletocutcomputation - $min)));

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