20

Opening the calculator to do such tiny stuff appears annoying to me ,and I strongly believe in ths saying "the more you know,the better!" so here I am asking you how to convert hexadecimal to decimal.

Till that moment I use the following formula:

Hex:        Decimal:
12          12+6
22          22+2*6
34          34+3*6
49          49+4*6
99          99+9*6

I get confused when I move on at higher numbers like C0 or FB

What is the formula(brain,not functional) that you're using?

37

If you consider that hexadecimal is base 16, its actually quite easy:

Start from the least significant digit and work towards the most significant (right to left) and multiply the digit with increasing powers of 16, then sum the result.

For example:

0x12 = 2 + (1 * 16) = 18

0x99 = 9 + (9 * 16) = 153

Then, remember that A = 10, B = 11, C = 12, D = 13, E = 14 and F = 15

So,

0xFB = 11 + (15 * 16) = 251

  • NOTE: This is good only if you need to convert 2 digit hexadecimals. If you need something larger, see the formulas below. – Vippy Nov 19 '15 at 23:00
  • 1
    @Vippy, perhaps the example isn't clear, but "multiply the digit with increasing powers of 16" does work with more than 2 digits. – Andre Miller Nov 21 '15 at 7:15
15

That's not the formula.. that's not even somewhat like the formula...

The formula is:

X*16^y where X is the number you want to convert and y is the position for the number (from right to left).

So.. if you want to convert DA145 to decimal would be..

(5 * 16^0) + (4 * 16^1) + (1 * 16^2) + (10 * 16^3) + (13 * 16^4)

And you have to remember that the letter are:
A - 10
B - 11
C - 12
D - 13
E - 14
F - 15

  • 7
    His formula is completely correct (and not merely coincidentally) for the class of numbers on which it operates. It just can't handle more than 2 digits or any of the alpha-digits. – sblom Jun 22 '09 at 20:14
  • this is the best answer – Zack Shapiro Jun 11 '18 at 21:26
  • Where/how does the formula arise? It seems their formula is pretty random – information_interchange Oct 14 '18 at 4:09
8

I pretty much stopped doing this when I found the hex numbers I was working with were 32 bits. Not much fun there.

For smaller numbers, I (eventually) memorized some patterns: 10 = 16, 20 = 32, 40 = 64, 80 = 128 (because 100 = 256, and 80 is one bit less). 200 = 512 I remember because of some machine I used to use whose page size was 512 (no longer remember what machine!). 1000 = 4096 because that's another machine's page size.

That's about all. Beyond that, I add.

  • Also, 400 = 1024 and 800 = 2048. – A_Arnold Dec 13 '16 at 23:09
7

For the record, your brain does use a functional method of finding the answer. Here's the function my brain uses to find the value of a hexadecimal number:

  1. Divide the hexadecimal number into individual digits.
  2. Convert each digit to it's decimal value (so 0-9 stay the same, A is 10, B is 11, etc.)
  3. Starting at the rightmost digit, multiply each value by 16^X power, where X is the distance from the rightmost digit (so the rightmost digit is 16^0, or 1, next is 16^1, or 16, next is 16^2, or 256, etc.)
  4. Add all the values together.
3

Memorize the decimal values of 20h, 40h, and so on, up to E0h. (I suppose you already know 100h.) Then get the decimal values if other numbers by adding or subtracting a number from 1 to 16.

2

The decimal value will be

20h = 0x16^0 + 2x16^1 = 0x1 + 2x16 = 0 + 32 = 32

in decimal notation, or (32)10.

For 40h in hexa we will have 64 in decimal, for EOH, we will have 224 in decimal.

0

In determining the decimal value of a specific index in a word, generalized for all bases:

b^i*n

where b is the base, i is the index in the word, and n is the numeric value at the index. Remember this by remembering that b,i,n = bin = short for binary.

Examples:


for base2 (binary) 1000, getting the value where the 1 is located:

b = base, ie base2: b=2

i = 0-based index within word, ie 1000, 1 is in 3th index, i=3

n = number listed in index, ie 1000, 3th index is 1, n=1

so, 2^3*1 = 8


for base10 (decimal) 900, getting the value where the 9 is located:

b=10, i=2, n=9 : 10^2*9 = 100*9 =900


for base16 (hexadecimal) 0x0f0, getting the value where the f is located:

b=16, i=1, n=15 (0-9,a-f,f=15) : 16^1*15 = 16*15 = 240


Note that this can be used to determine the value of each index in a word, then each value can be summed to determine the full word value.

e.g. 1001, from left to right (order doesn't matter in summation):

(2^3*1=8) + (2^2*0=0) + (2^1*0=0) + (2^0*1=1) = 9

  • Your equation b^i*n is valid ! Do not -1 this post ;) – Servuc Oct 24 '18 at 10:11
  • thanks, it came to me in a dream – ferr Oct 24 '18 at 16:35

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