I'm looking for something (preferably a Firefox extension) which will allow me to see all AJAX subrequests. Basically, anytime an XMLHTTPRequest() is made, I want to know what URL was being requested and what (if any) GET and POST vars were passed along with it.

Unless I'm missing it, I don't see anything quite like this in Firebug or Web Developer Toolbar.

(In case you're curious, the main reason for wanting this is that I want to scrape a local copy of a site that is using JS to load all its contents, and I don't want to spend hours digging through their JS code when I could just see the subrequests being made.)

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Firebug should show it in the Net panel.

EDIT: Also, if Firebug slows down your Firefox in a way that makes it unusable, like it does for me sometimes, WireShark (formerly Ethereal) will analyze all network traffic on your system, including HTTP and AJAX requests.

Fiddler 2 is a great tool for watching HTTP traffic.

* 2014 Update *

Since my original post, both Internet Explorer and Chrome have added built-in developer tools that are quite useful. While I still support and use Fiddler for non-web related http monitoring or when I need to really dig in deep and modify requests in transit, these days I find myself pretty much using IE or Chrome's built in tools as they are sufficient for 99% of my needs. They both have a networking tab, where you can monitor http requests, plus other nifty features for debugging webpages.

  • 2
    +1, Fiddler works with every browser, Firebug is tied to FF – Daniel Silveira May 27 '09 at 11:21
  • It maybe worth mentioning that Firefox now also has its own built-in developer tools without the need to install an add-on. To view network requests push Ctrl-Shift-Q. – Mike Nov 8 '15 at 1:18

I have used nearly all the big tools out there (fiddler, firebug, httpfox, live http headers). The best one in my opinion is HTTPFox if you are using Firefox because it has easy filtering capabilities, allows you to view your JSON the request/response as raw or formatted and the over all interface is very clean.

Also, I can't do without WFetch for testing web services and AJAX stuff. Usually I'll take the request from HTTPFox and paste it into WFetch. This way I don't have to go through the browser each time. I just hit F5 in WFetch to replay the request and I directly modify the request.

Side note: In WFetch, be careful about content-length if you have a POST payload. If you modify the payload the content-length needs to be changed as appropriate. For this reason I save my requests in a file and point WFetch to the file. In the file itself it is easy to know the length of the line and change content-length to that.

alt text http://blog.koreus.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/httpfox.png

alt text http://www.port80software.com/assets/images/ld_wfetch3.gif

Firebug shows them in both the Net panel, and the Console view. You need to turn on "Show XMLHttpRequests" though.

Have a look at Tamper Data as well. It's a Firefox add-on that lets you have a look at each individual HTTP request (including any post data) and response, and the headers of both. I've found it very useful for debugging AJAX problems...although Firebug works just fine.

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