51

I've a pipline doing just

 command1 | command2

So, stdout of command1 goes to command2 , while stderr of command1 go to the terminal (or wherever stdout of the shell is).

How can I pipe stderr of command1 to a third process (command3) while stdout is still going to command2 ?

53

Use another file descriptor

{ command1 2>&3 | command2; } 3>&1 1>&2 | command3

You can use up to 7 other file descriptors: from 3 to 9.
If you want more explanation, please ask, I can explain ;-)

Test

{ { echo a; echo >&2 b; } 2>&3 | sed >&2 's/$/1/'; } 3>&1 1>&2 | sed 's/$/2/'

output:

b2
a1

Example

Produce two log files:
1. stderr only
2. stderr and stdout

{ { { command 2>&1 1>&3; } | tee err-only.log; } 3>&1; } > err-and-stdout.log

If command is echo "stdout"; echo "stderr" >&2 then we can test it like that:

$ { { { echo out>&3;echo err>&1;}| tee err-only.log;} 3>&1;} > err-and-stdout.log
$ head err-only.log err-and-stdout.log
==> err-only.log <==
err

==> err-and-stdout.log <==
out
err
  • How do you add a file descriptor? echo out >&3 outputs "-bash: 3: Bad file descriptor" – Isaac Betesh Aug 26 '13 at 20:47
  • 2
    Found the answer here: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/18899/… – Isaac Betesh Aug 26 '13 at 20:55
  • 1
    antak's answer below is more complete. It still maintains the original separation between stdout and stderr as the command does without all the pipes. Note that with pipes, command is run in a subprocess. If you don't want that, for you may want the command to modify global variables, you would need to create fifo and use redirections instead. – jxy Feb 24 '17 at 4:32
25

The accepted answer results in the reversing of stdout and stderr. Here's a method that preserves them (since Googling on that purpose brings up this post):

{ command 2>&1 1>&3 3>&- | stderr_command; } 3>&1 1>&2 | stdout_command

Notice:

  • 3>&- is required to prevent fd 3 from being inherited by command. (As this can lead to unexpected results depending on what command does inside.)

Parts explained:

  1. Outer part first:

    1. 3>&1 -- fd 3 for { ... } is set to what fd 1 was (i.e. stdout)
    2. 1>&2 -- fd 1 for { ... } is set to what fd 2 was (i.e. stderr)
    3. | stdout_command -- fd 1 (was stdout) is piped through stdout_command
  2. Inner part inherits file descriptors from the outer part:

    1. 2>&1 -- fd 2 for command is set to what fd 1 was (i.e. stderr as per outer part)
    2. 1>&3 -- fd 1 for command is set to what fd 3 was (i.e. stdout as per outer part)
    3. 3>&- -- fd 3 for command is set to nothing (i.e. closed)
    4. | stderr_command -- fd 1 (was stderr) is piped through stderr_command

Example:

foo() {
    echo a
    echo b >&2
    echo c
    echo d >&2
}

{ foo 2>&1 1>&3 3>&- | sed -u 's/^/err: /'; } 3>&1 1>&2 | sed -u 's/^/out: /'

Output:

out: a
err: b
err: d
out: c

(Order of a -> c and b -> d will always be indeterminate because there's no form of synchronization between stderr_command and stdout_command.)

  • This thing works, I verified it but I am not able to understand how it works. In the outer part, Point 3 stdout_command isn't fd1 now pointing to stderr, how is stdout going there instead of stderr. – Rahul Kadukar Mar 11 '16 at 21:32
  • Infact this also worked (command 2>&1 | stderr_command; ) 1>&2 | stdout_command – Rahul Kadukar Mar 11 '16 at 22:01
13

Simply redirect stderr to stdout

{ command1 | command2; } 2>&1 | command3

Caution: commnd3 will also read command2 stdout (if any).
To avoid that, you can discard commnd2 stdout:

{ command1 | command2 >/dev/null; } 2>&1 | command3

However, to keep command2 stdout (e.g. in the terminal),
then please refer to my other answer more complex.

Test

{ { echo -e "a\nb\nc" >&2; echo "----"; } | sed 's/$/1/'; } 2>&1 | sed 's/$/2/'

output:

a2
b2
c2
----12
  • 1
    Whoops, good call. I intially thought the OP wanted stderr to go only to command 3. This looks like the right way to go. – FatalError Feb 2 '12 at 14:22
  • 1
    Wouldn't { command1 | command2 >/dev/null 2>&1 } 2>&1 | command3 prevent stdout/stderr of command2 to reach command3 , or would that also mess with stderr of command1 ? – user964970 Feb 2 '12 at 15:02
  • Hi @user964970. The /dev/null redirection is a good idea. As you said, your example above mess stderr and stdout because they are inverted in the same step. I would prefer { command1 | command2 >/dev/null; } 2>&1 | command3. I edit my answer to use your brilliant contribution. Thanks ;-) – olibre Feb 2 '12 at 15:38
5

Using process substitution:

command1 > >(command2) 2> >(command3)

See http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/process-sub.html for more info.

  • 1
    Note: this is not POSIX but a bashism. – josch Jan 17 at 8:00
1

The same effect can be accomplished fairly easily with a fifo. I'm not aware of a direct piping syntax for doing it (though it would be nifty to see one). This is how you might do it with a fifo.

First, something that prints to both stdout and stderr, outerr.sh:

#!/bin/bash

echo "This goes to stdout"
echo "This goes to stderr" >&2

Then we can do something like this:

$ mkfifo err
$ wc -c err &
[1] 2546
$ ./outerr.sh 2>err | wc -c
20
20 err
[1]+  Done                    wc -c err

That way you set up the listener for stderr output first and it blocks until it has a writer, which happens in the next command, using the syntax 2>err. You can see that each wc -c got 20 characters of input.

Don't forget to clean up the fifo after you're done if you don't want it to hang around (i.e. rm). If the other command wants input on stdin and not a file arg, you can use input redirection like wc -c < err too.

  • Looks like the OP wanted both stdout and stderr to go to command2, which I initially missed. The above separates the two and send each separately to a command. I'll leave it though, as it might be useful to somebody. – FatalError Feb 2 '12 at 14:23
  • No, I do not want both stdout and stderr to go to command2. stdout of command1 to command2, stderr of command1 to command3. command2 should not get stderr of command1 – user964970 Feb 2 '12 at 14:57
  • Ah, reread again. My mistake. – FatalError Feb 2 '12 at 15:04
0

Pipe stdout as usual, but use Bash process substitution for the stderr redirection:

some_command 2> >(command of stderr) | command of stdout

Header: #!/bin/bash

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