74

Whats the prettiest way to compare one value against multiples options?

I know there are loads of ways of doing this, but I'm looking for the neatest.

i ask because i'd hoped this was workable (it isn't, quite obviously when you look at it):

if (foobar == (foo||bar) ) {
     //do something
}
  • 2
    You could use the javascript test function like if(/foo|bar|ow|my|javascript|works/.test( foobar )) { /*do something*/ } This question simular to mine – Ron van der Heijden Feb 13 '13 at 10:31
  • I would note here that foo will not evaluate correctly, it won't check bar e.g. 1 === (2 || 1) will return false... – Neil Mar 21 '19 at 16:04
117

Don't try to be too sneaky, especially when it needlessly affects performance. If you really have a whole heap of comparisons to do, just format it nicely.

if (foobar === foo ||
    foobar === bar ||
    foobar === baz ||
    foobar === pew) {
     //do something
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 23
    You could speed it up if you sort the terms with descending probability to be true. :) – wenzul Aug 11 '15 at 15:19
70

What i use to do, is put those multiple values in an array like

var options = [foo, bar];

and then, use indexOf()

if(options.indexOf(foobar) > -1){
   //do something
}

for prettiness:

if([foo, bar].indexOf(foobar) +1){
   //you can't get any more pretty than this :)
}

and for the older browsers:
( https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/IndexOf )

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function (searchElement /*, fromIndex */ ) {
        "use strict";
        if (this == null) {
            throw new TypeError();
        }
        var t = Object(this);
        var len = t.length >>> 0;
        if (len === 0) {
            return -1;
        }
        var n = 0;
        if (arguments.length > 0) {
            n = Number(arguments[1]);
            if (n != n) { // shortcut for verifying if it's NaN
                n = 0;
            } else if (n != 0 && n != Infinity && n != -Infinity) {
                n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
            }
        }
        if (n >= len) {
            return -1;
        }
        var k = n >= 0 ? n : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);
        for (; k < len; k++) {
            if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement) {
                return k;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    indexOf for arrays is only provided in IE starting with version 9, so I would avoid using it until 8 gets off the market (a long ways away, unfortunately). That said, the MDN provides sample implementation code for browsers that don't support it. – Reid Feb 2 '12 at 23:15
  • 1
    The Array.indexOf method is only supported in Javascript 1.6 and later, so you need a fallback for older browsers. – Guffa Feb 2 '12 at 23:17
  • IMO, this doesn't qualify as 'pretty'. It is compact, for sure, but it really doesn't read well. When you read the OP's suggestion, which is invalid but readable, this suggestion is far from obvious what is going on, and you need to think what is actually happening...that is very bad, imo. – Max Waterman May 28 at 3:18
  • @MaxWaterman, everyone's entitled to their opinion, cudos :) – André Alçada Padez May 28 at 12:45
  • 2
    The new way to do it with ES6 is using includes: stackoverflow.com/questions/2430000/… – baptx Jul 1 at 12:55
22

Since nobody has added the obvious solution yet which works fine for two comparisons, I'll offer it:

if (foobar === foo || foobar === bar) {
     //do something
}

And, if you have lots of values (perhaps hundreds or thousands), then I'd suggest making a Set as this makes very clean and simple comparison code and it's fast at runtime:

// pre-construct the Set
var tSet = new Set(["foo", "bar", "test1", "test2", "test3", ...]);

// test the Set at runtime
if (tSet.has(foobar)) {
    // do something
}

For pre-ES6, you can get a Set polyfill of which there are many. One is described in this other answer.

| improve this answer | |
  • Sets are still slower than native optimizations to string comparisons. Let the browser do the optimizations. People who try to outsmart the browsers almost always end up with much slower code. – Jack Giffin Jun 30 '18 at 0:08
  • 2
    @JackGiffin - What are you suggesting here? The first part of my answer is just the simplest comparison and the JS engine can optimize that however it likes. The second part of my answer that uses a Set is targeted at the case where you have lots of values to compare to (hundreds or thousands). I don't understand what you are suggesting instead of these or what you think is wrong with these suggestions? – jfriend00 Jun 30 '18 at 0:33
  • @JackGiffin - Also, this is a 6 year old question/answers. Why you are commenting on so many answers as if this is an active question? – jfriend00 Jun 30 '18 at 0:38
  • How is Set better than common Array: if(['foo', 'bar'].includes(value))? – DIES Oct 6 at 19:03
  • @DIES - A Set uses a hash table lookup, whereas, .includes() uses a linear search. When you have more than few items in the collection, the Set should be a lot faster to see if an item is in the Set. Plus, .add() for a Set prevents duplicates. – jfriend00 Oct 6 at 20:04
20

You can use a switch:

switch (foobar) {
  case foo:
  case bar:
    // do something
}
| improve this answer | |
16

Just for kicks, since this Q&A does seem to be about syntax microanalysis, a tiny tiny modification of André Alçada Padez's suggestion(s):

(and of course accounting for the pre-IE9 shim/shiv/polyfill he's included)

if (~[foo, bar].indexOf(foobar)) {
    // pretty
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    !!~['foo', 'bar'].indexOf('foo') 🙃 – Pavel Levin Jun 25 '19 at 13:45
8

Why not using indexOf from array like bellow?

if ([foo, bar].indexOf(foobar) !== -1) {
    // do something
}

Just plain Javascript, no frameworks or libraries but it will not work on IE < 9.

| improve this answer | |
  • Already mentioned twice nearly same code snippets. – Jack Giffin Jun 30 '18 at 0:10
1

(foobar == foo || foobar == bar) otherwise if you are comparing expressions based only on a single integer, enumerated value, or String object you can use switch. See The switch Statement. You can also use the method suggested by André Alçada Padez. Ultimately what you select will need to depend on the details of what you are doing.

| improve this answer | |
  • Already mentioned three times above. At stack overflow, you are expected to only post solutions that are not among the already existing answers to a question. – Jack Giffin Jun 30 '18 at 0:13
  • @JackGiffin - If you look at the time stamps, there were not multiple other answers posted before this one that showed this solution. Answers here are not necessarily displayed in posting order. Only my answer that shows this appears to be before it and that is only 3 seconds before it so not something this author would have seen. The accepted answer even came after this one. Again, I'm not sure why you're bashing people over a 6 year old answer. – jfriend00 Jun 30 '18 at 0:55
  • @jfriend00 You're right! I studied all the time stamps, and david is the fraud, not JamieSee. JamieSee got his answer out 14 minutes before david, and David has the exact same answer, but david got the credit, and JamieSee did not. Let us upvote JamieSee's more justified answer. – Jack Giffin Jul 3 '18 at 22:52
  • @JackGiffin - It's not only about who gets there first. There are other aspects to a good answer besides just whether it has the right content in it somewhere such as how clearly it's written, how well the explanation is done, etc... The OP even comments on david's answer that it's the "most legible". There are even times when it's appropriate to write another answer that isn't all that unique just because none of the existing answers do a very good job of presenting and explaining things. I'm not implying anything about that in this case, just that being first isn't the only criteria. – jfriend00 Jul 4 '18 at 0:18
  • @JackGiffin - The checkmark is supposed to go to the best answer. It's a contest to see who can write the best answer. Multiple submissions are allowed. Straight copying without adding something worthwhile is frowned on, but attempting to write a better answer that explains things better or explains some new aspects is not only allowed but desired. Again, I'm not implying anything about this particular case, just commenting in general. – jfriend00 Jul 4 '18 at 0:21
1

I like the pretty form of testing indexOf with an array, but be aware, this doesn't work in all browsers (because Array.prototype.indexOf is not present in old IExplorers).

However, there is a similar way by using jQuery with the $.inArray() function :

if ($.inArray(field, ['value1', 'value2', 'value3']) > -1) {
    alert('value ' + field + ' is into the list'); 
}

It could be better, so you should not test if indexOf exists.

Be careful with the comparison (don't use == true/false), because $.inArray returns the index of matching position where the value has been found, and if the index is 0, it would be false when it really exist into the array.

| improve this answer | |
  • Please don't use jQuery (unless that is, you do want slow code and slow page load speeds in which case go for it -- I am noone to stop insanity) – Jack Giffin Jun 30 '18 at 0:12
0

The switch method (as mentioned by Guffa) works very nicely indeed. However, the default warning settings in most linters will alert you about the use of fall-through. It's one of the main reasons I use switches at all, so I pretty much ignore this warning, but you should be aware that the using the fall-through feature of the switch statement can be tricky. In cases like this, though - I'd go for it.

| improve this answer | |
  • @Rahul only editing in backticks is NOT Proper formatting is done – rene Feb 25 '14 at 12:10

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