146

I've been Googling and searching Stack Overflow for a while, but I just can't get around this problem.

I have a standard HTML table, containing, say, fruit. Like so:

<table>
   <tr>
      <td>Apple</td>
      <td>Green</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>Grapes</td>
      <td>Green</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>Orange</td>
      <td>Orange</td>
   </tr>
</table>

Above this I have a text box, which I would like to search the table as a user types. So, if they type Gre for example, the Orange row of the table would disapear, leaving the Apple and Grapes. If they carried on and typed Green Gr the Apple row should disapear, leaving just grapes. I hope this is clear.

And, should the user delete some or all of their query from the text box, I should like all of the rows that now match the query to reappear.

While I know how to remove a table row in jQuery, I have little idea about how to go about doing the search and removing rows selectively based on this. Is there a simple solution to this? Or a plugin?

If anyone could point me in the right direction it would be brilliant.

Thank you.

1
323

I created these examples.

Simple indexOf search

var $rows = $('#table tr');
$('#search').keyup(function() {
    var val = $.trim($(this).val()).replace(/ +/g, ' ').toLowerCase();

    $rows.show().filter(function() {
        var text = $(this).text().replace(/\s+/g, ' ').toLowerCase();
        return !~text.indexOf(val);
    }).hide();
});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/7BUmG/2/

Regular expression search

More advanced functionality using regular expressions will allow you to search words in any order in the row. It will work the same if you type apple green or green apple:

var $rows = $('#table tr');
$('#search').keyup(function() {

    var val = '^(?=.*\\b' + $.trim($(this).val()).split(/\s+/).join('\\b)(?=.*\\b') + ').*$',
        reg = RegExp(val, 'i'),
        text;

    $rows.show().filter(function() {
        text = $(this).text().replace(/\s+/g, ' ');
        return !reg.test(text);
    }).hide();
});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/dfsq/7BUmG/1133/

Debounce

When you implement table filtering with search over multiple rows and columns it is very important that you consider performance and search speed/optimisation. Simply saying you should not run search function on every single keystroke, it's not necessary. To prevent filtering to run too often you should debounce it. Above code example will become:

$('#search').keyup(debounce(function() {
    var val = $.trim($(this).val()).replace(/ +/g, ' ').toLowerCase();
    // etc...
}, 300));

You can pick any debounce implementation, for example from Lodash _.debounce, or you can use something very simple like I use in next demos (debounce from here): http://jsfiddle.net/7BUmG/6230/ and http://jsfiddle.net/7BUmG/6231/.

45
  • 3
    I'm pretty green with this stuff, but if I want to incorporate this into my table, do I just need to change the #table to the id of my table? Would there need to be additional changes to work with <thead> and <tbody> tags? I've included the script and html from the jsfiddle link, changing the #id, but I get no filtering.
    – JoshP
    May 31 '13 at 20:22
  • 10
    @JoshP Sctipt works with all the rows. If you want to filter only those inside the <tbody> you should change to var $rows = $('#id-of-your-table tbody tr');.
    – dfsq
    May 31 '13 at 20:58
  • 2
    @JoshP No, nothing but jQuery is required. Just make sure you run your code in DOMReady or after HTML is loaded.
    – dfsq
    May 31 '13 at 21:09
  • 2
    I would recommend to enhance this approach because it is quite resource consuming. Put all the refined strings into an array of objects with two fields: a reference to the <tr> DOMElement and the string. This way, on keyup() you search those strings (which is way faster) and have the corresponding rows ready to be manipulated. That first costly setup procedure should then be executed just once right after loading. All these changes are just minor fixes, the actual central part still remains as shown in this answer. This approach is also possible and pretty easy to implement w/o jQuery.
    – pid
    Jun 2 '14 at 18:21
  • 3
    @confusedMind Use $('#table tr:not(:first)') selector.
    – dfsq
    Mar 4 '15 at 6:27
10

i have an jquery plugin for this. It uses jquery-ui also. You can see an example here http://jsfiddle.net/tugrulorhan/fd8KB/1/

$("#searchContainer").gridSearch({
            primaryAction: "search",
            scrollDuration: 0,
            searchBarAtBottom: false,
            customScrollHeight: -35,
            visible: {
                before: true,
                next: true,
                filter: true,
                unfilter: true
            },
            textVisible: {
                before: true,
                next: true,
                filter: true,
                unfilter: true
            },
            minCount: 2
        });
0
10

Here is the best solution for searching inside HTML table while covering all of the table, (all td, tr in the table), pure javascript and as short as possible:

<input id='myInput' onkeyup='searchTable()' type='text'>

<table id='myTable'>
   <tr>
      <td>Apple</td>
      <td>Green</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>Grapes</td>
      <td>Green</td>
   </tr>
   <tr>
      <td>Orange</td>
      <td>Orange</td>
   </tr>
</table>

<script>
function searchTable() {
    var input, filter, found, table, tr, td, i, j;
    input = document.getElementById("myInput");
    filter = input.value.toUpperCase();
    table = document.getElementById("myTable");
    tr = table.getElementsByTagName("tr");
    for (i = 0; i < tr.length; i++) {
        td = tr[i].getElementsByTagName("td");
        for (j = 0; j < td.length; j++) {
            if (td[j].innerHTML.toUpperCase().indexOf(filter) > -1) {
                found = true;
            }
        }
        if (found) {
            tr[i].style.display = "";
            found = false;
        } else {
            tr[i].style.display = "none";
        }
    }
}
</script>
2
  • 4
    To protect the table header row from disappearing, add id to the row like: <tr id='tableHeader'> and change the final else statement to: if (tr[i].id != 'tableHeader'){tr[i].style.display = "none";} It is not mentioned in the question but I wanted it to cover that to make it comprehensive.
    – Tarik
    Nov 1 '16 at 14:36
  • Instead of comparing the id using !=, I suggest changing the final else to this: } else if (!tr[i].id.match('^tableHeader')) { This allows one to have more than one table, each with their own header. More work is needed to parameterize the searchTable function by passing in the table id.
    – Tom Ekberg
    Mar 30 '18 at 16:56
4

Pure Javascript Solution :

Works for ALL columns and Case Insensitive :

function search_table(){
  // Declare variables 
  var input, filter, table, tr, td, i;
  input = document.getElementById("search_field_input");
  filter = input.value.toUpperCase();
  table = document.getElementById("table_id");
  tr = table.getElementsByTagName("tr");

  // Loop through all table rows, and hide those who don't match the search query
  for (i = 0; i < tr.length; i++) {
    td = tr[i].getElementsByTagName("td") ; 
    for(j=0 ; j<td.length ; j++)
    {
      let tdata = td[j] ;
      if (tdata) {
        if (tdata.innerHTML.toUpperCase().indexOf(filter) > -1) {
          tr[i].style.display = "";
          break ; 
        } else {
          tr[i].style.display = "none";
        }
      } 
    }
  }
}
4

I found dfsq's answer its comments extremely useful. I made some minor modifications applicable to me (and I'm posting it here, in case it is of some use to others).

  1. Using class as hooks, instead of table elements tr
  2. Searching/comparing text within a child class while showing/hiding parent
  3. Making it more efficient by storing the $rows text elements into an array only once (and avoiding $rows.length times computation)

var $rows = $('.wrapper');
var rowsTextArray = [];

var i = 0;
$.each($rows, function () {
    rowsTextArray[i] = ($(this).find('.number').text() + $(this).find('.fruit').text())
        .replace(/\s+/g, '')
        .toLowerCase();
    i++;
});

$('#search').keyup(function() {
  var val = $.trim($(this).val()).replace(/\s+/g, '').toLowerCase();
  $rows.show().filter(function(index) {
    return (rowsTextArray[index].indexOf(val) === -1);
  }).hide();
});
span {
  margin-right: 0.2em;
}
<input type="text" id="search" placeholder="type to search" />

<div class="wrapper"><span class="number">one</span><span class="fruit">apple</span></div>
<div class="wrapper"><span class="number">two</span><span class="fruit">banana</span></div>
<div class="wrapper"><span class="number">three</span><span class="fruit">cherry</span></div>
<div class="wrapper"><span class="number">four</span><span class="fruit">date</span></div>
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

4
  • Not sure why this isn't searching for "o" even when there's o in "one, two, four"?
    – ThisDude
    Feb 23 at 15:20
  • even "w", i guess there are many values the regex isn't searching for
    – ThisDude
    Feb 23 at 15:21
  • That's because it was only reading the "fruit" and not the "number". I've updated it. I'd written this answer when I was very much a beginner.
    – Kaya Toast
    Feb 26 at 2:04
  • LOL, everyone does something good but not that better when a beginner 😊
    – ThisDude
    Feb 26 at 14:41
3

Thank you @dfsq for the very helpful code!

I've made some adjustments and maybe some others like them too. I ensured that you can search for multiple words, without having a strict match.

Example rows:

  • Apples and Pears
  • Apples and Bananas
  • Apples and Oranges
  • ...

You could search for 'ap pe' and it would recognise the first row
You could search for 'banana apple' and it would recognise the second row

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/JeroenSormani/xhpkfwgd/1/

var $rows = $('#table tr');
$('#search').keyup(function() {
  var val = $.trim($(this).val()).replace(/ +/g, ' ').toLowerCase().split(' ');

  $rows.hide().filter(function() {
    var text = $(this).text().replace(/\s+/g, ' ').toLowerCase();
    var matchesSearch = true;
    $(val).each(function(index, value) {
      matchesSearch = (!matchesSearch) ? false : ~text.indexOf(value);
    });
    return matchesSearch;
  }).show();
});
1
  • Solid search -- I had to modify it slightly to prevent my Table's headers & footers from disappearing, by changing: var $rows = $('#WorldPlayersTable tr'); to -- var $rows = $('#WorldPlayersTable tbody tr');
    – Drefetr
    Jun 29 '17 at 22:22
1

you can use native javascript like this

<script>
function myFunction() {
  var input, filter, table, tr, td, i;
  input = document.getElementById("myInput");
  filter = input.value.toUpperCase();
  table = document.getElementById("myTable");
  tr = table.getElementsByTagName("tr");
  for (i = 0; i < tr.length; i++) {
    td = tr[i].getElementsByTagName("td")[0];
    if (td) {
      if (td.innerHTML.toUpperCase().indexOf(filter) > -1) {
        tr[i].style.display = "";
      } else {
        tr[i].style.display = "none";
      }
    }       
  }
}
</script>

0

Datatable JS plugin is also one good alternate to accomedate search feature for html table

var table = $('#example').DataTable();

// #myInput is a <input type="text"> element
$('#myInput').on( 'keyup', function () {
    table.search( this.value ).draw();
} );

https://datatables.net/examples/basic_init/zero_configuration.html

-1

If you can separate html and data, you can use external libraries like datatables or the one i created. https://github.com/thehitechpanky/js-bootstrap-tables

This library uses keyup function to reload tabledata and hence it appears to work like search.

function _addTableDataRows(paramObjectTDR) {
    let { filterNode, limitNode, bodyNode, countNode, paramObject } = paramObjectTDR;
    let { dataRows, functionArray } = paramObject;
    _clearNode(bodyNode);
    if (typeof dataRows === `string`) {
        bodyNode.insertAdjacentHTML(`beforeend`, dataRows);
    } else {
        let filterTerm;
        if (filterNode) {
            filterTerm = filterNode.value.toLowerCase();
        }
        let serialNumber = 0;
        let limitNumber = 0;
        let rowNode;
        dataRows.forEach(currentRow => {
            if (!filterNode || _filterData(filterTerm, currentRow)) {
                serialNumber++;
                if (!limitNode || limitNode.value === `all` || limitNode.value >= serialNumber) {
                    limitNumber++;
                    rowNode = _getNode(`tr`);
                    bodyNode.appendChild(rowNode);
                    _addData(rowNode, serialNumber, currentRow, `td`);
                }
            }
        });
        _clearNode(countNode);
        countNode.insertAdjacentText(`beforeend`, `Showing 1 to ${limitNumber} of ${serialNumber} entries`);
    }
    if (functionArray) {
        functionArray.forEach(currentObject => {
            let { className, eventName, functionName } = currentObject;
            _attachFunctionToClassNodes(className, eventName, functionName);
        });
    }
}

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